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We have a current application where user login credentials are stored in a SQL Server DB. These are, basically, stored as a plain text username, a password hash, and an associated salt for this hash.

These were all created by built in functions in ASP.NET's membership/role system. Here's a row for a user named 'joe' and a password of 'password':

joe,kDP0Py2QwEdJYtUX9cJABg==,OJF6H4KdxFLgLu+oTDNFodCEfMA=

I've dumped this stuff into a CSV file and I'm attempting to get it into a usable format for Django which stores its passwords in this format:

[algo]$[salt]$[hash]

Where the salt is a plain string and the hash is the hex digest of an SHA1 hash.

So far I've been able to ascertain that ASP is storing these hashes and salts in a base64 format. Those values above decode into binary strings.

We've used reflector to glean how ASP authenticates against these values:

internal string EncodePassword(string pass, int passwordFormat, string salt)
{
    if (passwordFormat == 0)
    {
        return pass;
    }
    byte[] bytes = Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(pass);
    byte[] src = Convert.FromBase64String(salt);
    byte[] dst = new byte[src.Length + bytes.Length];
    byte[] inArray = null;
    Buffer.BlockCopy(src, 0, dst, 0, src.Length);
    Buffer.BlockCopy(bytes, 0, dst, src.Length, bytes.Length);
    if (passwordFormat == 1)
    {
        HashAlgorithm algorithm = HashAlgorithm.Create(Membership.HashAlgorithmType);
        if ((algorithm == null) && Membership.IsHashAlgorithmFromMembershipConfig)
        {
            RuntimeConfig.GetAppConfig().Membership.ThrowHashAlgorithmException();
        }
        inArray = algorithm.ComputeHash(dst);
    }
    else
    {
        inArray = this.EncryptPassword(dst);
    }
    return Convert.ToBase64String(inArray);
}

Eseentially, pulls in the salt from the DB and b64 decodes it into a binary representation. It does a "GetBytes" on the raw password and then it concatinates them, salt first.

It then runs the SHA1 algorithm on this new string, base64 encodes it, and compares it against the value stored in the database.

I've attempted to write some code to try and reproduce these hashes in Python and I'm failing. I won't be able to use them in Django until I can figure out how this translates over. Here's how I'm testing:

import hashlib
from base64 import b64decode, b64encode

b64salt = "kDP0Py2QwEdJYtUX9cJABg=="
b64hash = "OJF6H4KdxFLgLu+oTDNFodCEfMA="
binsalt = b64decode(b64salt)
password_string = 'password'

m1 = hashlib.sha1()
# Pass in salt
m1.update(binsalt)
# Pass in password
m1.update(password_string)
# B64 encode the binary digest
if b64encode(m1.digest()) == b64hash:
    print "Logged in!"
else:
    print "Didn't match"
    print b64hash
    print b64encode(m1.digest())

I'm wondering if anyone can see any flaws in my approach or can suggest an alternate method. Perhaps you can take the algorithms above and the known password and salt above and produce the hash on your system?

share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

It appears python is inserting a byte order marker when you convert a UTF16 string to binary. The .NET byte array contains no BOM, so I did some ghetto python that turns the UTF16 into hex, removes the first 4 characters, then decodes it to binary.

There may be a better way to rip out the BOM, but this works for me!

Here's one that passes:

import hashlib
from base64 import b64decode, b64encode

def utf16tobin(s):
  return s.encode('hex')[4:].decode('hex')

b64salt = "kDP0Py2QwEdJYtUX9cJABg=="
b64hash = "OJF6H4KdxFLgLu+oTDNFodCEfMA="
binsalt = b64decode(b64salt)
password_string = 'password'.encode("utf16")
password_string = utf16tobin(password_string)

m1 = hashlib.sha1()
# Pass in salt
m1.update(binsalt + password_string)
# Pass in password
# B64 encode the binary digest
if b64encode(m1.digest()) == b64hash:
    print "Logged in!"
else:
    print "Didn't match"
    print b64hash
    print b64encode(m1.digest())
share|improve this answer
    
This solution worked great, thanks so much! – sharvell Apr 15 '13 at 23:38
1  
I believe the encoding you need is called "utf-16le" so you don't have to manually kill the BOM – Bryan Rehbein Jan 17 '14 at 2:55
    
@BryanRehbein you are right, with password_string = 'password'.encode("utf-16-le") you can omit the utf16tobin workaround entirely. – s29 Oct 8 '15 at 18:09

Two thoughts as to what could be going wrong.

First the code from the reflection has three paths:

  • If passwordFormat is 0 it returns the password as is.
  • If passwordFormat is 1 it creates the hash as your python code does.
  • If passwordFormat is anything other than 0 or 1 it calls this.EncryptPassword()

How do you know you are hashing the password, and not encrypting the password with this.EncryptPassword()? You may need to reverse the EncryptPassword() member function and replicate that. That is unless you have some information which ensures that you are hashing the password and not encrypting it.

Second if it is indeed hashing the password you may want to see what the Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes() function returns for the string "password", as you may be getting something back like:

0x00 0x70 0x00 0x61 0x00 0x73 0x00 0x73 0x00 0x77 0x00 0x6F 0x00 0x72 0x00 0x64

instead of:

0x70 0x61 0x73 0x73 0x77 0x6F 0x72 0x64

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

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