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Is there a way to delete all empty sub-directories below a given directory from a batch file?

Or is it possible to recursively copy a directory, but excluding any empty directories?

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closed as off-topic by Cole Johnson, HansUp, Waldheinz, Mena, Liam Oct 8 '13 at 10:39

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

To copy ignoring empty dirs you can use one of:

robocopy c:\source\ c:\dest\ * /s
xcopy c:\source c:\dest\*.* /s
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You really have two questions:

1. Is there a way to delete all empty sub-directories below a given directory from a batch file?

Yes. This one-line DOS batch file works for me. You can pass in an argument for a pattern / root or it will use the current directory.

for /f "delims=" %%d in ('dir /s /b /ad %1 ^| sort /r') do rd "%%d" 2>nul

The reason I use 'dir|sort' is for performance (both 'dir' and 'sort' are fairly fast). It avoids the recursive batch function solution used in one of the other answers which is perfectly valid but can be infuriatingly slow :-(

2. Or is it possible to recursively copy a directory, but excluding any empty directories?

There are a number of ways to do this listed in other answers.

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@echo off
setlocal ENABLEEXTENSIONS
call :rmemptydirs "%~1"
goto:EOF
:rmemptydirs
FOR /D %%A IN ("%~1\*") DO (
    REM recurse into subfolders first...
 call :rmemptydirs "%%~fA"
)
RD "%~f1" >nul 2>&1
goto:EOF

Call with: rmemptydirs.cmd "c:\root dir to delete empty folders in"

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xcopy's /s will ignore blank folder when copying

xcopy * path\to\newfolder /s /q
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Why use external dir command when FOR has directory support with /D and /R ? –  Anders Apr 23 '10 at 13:27
1  
Thanks for pointing out @Anders, its just my knowledge about batch commands are limited, +1ed to yours. I've learnt something more now. Thanks. –  YOU Apr 23 '10 at 14:22
    
@S.Mark: Now that I have looked at it a bit more, your FOR code has several issues: 1)Spaces in paths. 2)Are you sure DIR will print the deepest folder first? If not, c:\folder1\folder2 will fail if folder2 is empty and folder1 only has folder2. –  Anders Apr 23 '10 at 14:44
    
@Anders, yeah, thats why I noted it is not recursive. DIR does not print deepest folder first with above usage. To remove folder1, script need to run 2 times. anyway, I'm going remove for part now. thanks again. –  YOU Apr 23 '10 at 15:14
    
@YOU: The 'dir' solution will work if you pipe it to 'sort /r'. You can use quotes to get names with spaces to work as well. –  Adisak Jun 12 '12 at 22:02

This batch file does the trick just fine from any path, in my case I use Windows Environment variable IWAY61 :

@echo off

cd %IWAY61%

for /f "usebackq delims=" %%d in (`"dir /ad/b/s | sort /R"`) do rd "%%d"
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