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The Problem

I have the following code:

<html>
<head>
<style id="ID_Style">
.myStyle
{
   color : #FF0000 ;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>

   <p class="myStyle">
      Hello World !
   </p>

</body>
</html>

And I want to modify the contents of <style> through JavaScript.

The Expected Solution

The first solution was to use the innerHTML property of the style element (retrieved through its id), but while it works on Firefox, it fails on Internet Explorer 7.

So, I used pure DOM methods, that is, creating an element called style, a text node with the desired content, and append the text node as a child of the style node, etc. It fails, too.

According to MSDN, the <style> element has an innerHTML property, and according to W3C, the <style> element is a HTMLStyleElement, which derives from HTMLElement, deriving from Element deriving from Node, which has the appendChild method. It seems to behave as if the content of a <style> element was readonly on Internet Explorer.

The Question

So the question is: Is there a way to modify the content of a <style> element on Internet Explorer?

While the current problem is with IE7, a cross-browser solution would be cool, if possible.

Appendix

Sources:

Style Element (MSDN): http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms535898.aspx

HTMLStyleElement (W3C): http://www.w3.org/TR/2003/REC-DOM-Level-2-HTML-20030109/html.html#ID-16428977

Complete Test Code

You can use this test code if you want to reproduce your problem:

<html>
<head>
<style id="ID_Style">
.myStyle
{
   color : #FF0000 ;
}
</style>
<script>
function replaceStyleViaDOM(p_strContent)
{
   var oOld = document.getElementById("ID_Style") ;
   var oParent = oOld.parentNode ;
   oParent.removeChild(oOld) ;

   var oNew = document.createElement("style") ;
   oParent.appendChild(oNew) ;

   oNew.setAttribute("id", "ID_Style") ;
   var oText = document.createTextNode(p_strContent) ;
   oNew.appendChild(oText) ;
}

function replaceStyleViaInnerHTML(p_strContent)
{
   document.getElementById("ID_Style").innerHTML = p_strContent ;
}
</script>
<script>
function setRedViaDOM()
{
   replaceStyleViaDOM("\n.myStyle { color : #FF0000 ; }\n")
}

function setRedViaInnerHTML()
{
   replaceStyleViaInnerHTML("\n.myStyle { color : #FF0000 ; }\n")
}

function setBlueViaDOM()
{
   replaceStyleViaDOM("\n.myStyle { color : #0000FF ; }\n")
}

function setBlueViaInnerHTML()
{
   replaceStyleViaInnerHTML("\n.myStyle { color : #0000FF ; }\n")
}

function alertStyle()
{
   alert("*******************\n" + document.getElementById("ID_Style").innerHTML + "\n*******************") ;
}
</script>
</head>
<body>

   <div>
      <button type="button" onclick="alertStyle()">alert Style</button>
      <br />
      <button type="button" onclick="setRedViaDOM()">set Red via DOM</button>
      <button type="button" onclick="setRedViaDOM()">set Red via InnerHTML</button>
      <br />
      <button type="button" onclick="setBlueViaDOM()">set Blue via DOM</button>
      <button type="button" onclick="setBlueViaInnerHTML()">set Blue via InnerHTML</button>
   </div>

   <p class="myStyle">
      Hello World !
   </p>

</body>
</html>

Thanks !

Edit

Note that moving the <style> element from the <head> into the <body> doesn't change the problem.

share|improve this question
    
But you can overload anything that appears in the style tag via important! anyway... –  Kzqai Apr 23 '10 at 12:18
    
@Tchalvak: The aim is to generate CSS code on the fly inside a style element, and update it according to user's choice (i.e., through JavaScript). The aim is not to change the class or style attributes of all elements inside the document. –  paercebal Apr 23 '10 at 12:45
    
This is exactly what jQuery was designed for. Is there any reason you don't want to use it for this? –  Christopher Harris Apr 30 '11 at 23:39
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Generating CSS on the fly has its advantages. If you would like to set the innerHTML of a style element in IE use styleSheet.cssText. For example: http://jsbin.com/awecu4

<!doctype html>
<script>
var style = document.createElement('style'),
script = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0],
styles = '#test{background:green;}';
script.parentNode.insertBefore(style, script);

try{style.innerHTML = styles;}
//IE fix
catch(error){style.styleSheet.cssText = styles;}
</script>
<div id=test>Div with id of test</div>
share|improve this answer
    
The style.styleSheet.cssText is what I was searching for. Confirmed in the following MSDN page's comments: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms536398.aspx ... I'll try it at work (I don't have IE here). –  paercebal Jun 18 '11 at 9:05
1  
don't have IE either, I just use IE NetRender to do simply testing while on linux. –  Liam William Jun 19 '11 at 19:50
add comment

Here is a handy page that explains the intricacies of manipulating stylesheets with JS. It also goes into the differences between how it's done for IE v.s. standards-based browsers.

Totally Pwn CSS with Javascript

share|improve this answer
    
@Diodeus: Looking at the code in the page you mentionned, I see I can resolve my problem with additional code on my page. Not as easy as I would have wanted, still, it is a solution (and perhaps, the unique solution). I'll test it tomorrow. –  paercebal Apr 23 '10 at 13:46
    
Yeah, there are a few things in JavaScript that are still ugly, this being one of them. Managing text cursor positions is another. –  Diodeus Apr 23 '10 at 14:31
    
+1, by the way. –  paercebal Apr 23 '10 at 15:49
add comment

Today, in all browsers (including I believe IE9+), you can set the value of textContent on the script element and it will work the way you want, including > in selectors.

share|improve this answer
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