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Is there a not so ugly way of treat the close() exception to close both streams then:

    InputStream in = new FileInputStream(inputFileName);
    OutputStream out = new FileOutputStream(outputFileName);

    try {
    copy(in, out);
    } finally {
    try {
        in.close();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        try {
        // event if in.close fails, need to close the out
        out.close();
        } catch (Exception e2) {}
        throw e; // and throw the 'in' exception
    }
    out.close();
    }

update: All the above code is within one more try-catch, thanks for the warnings.

--FINALLY (after the answers)

And a good utility method can be done using Execute Around idiom (thanks Tom Hawtin).

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6  
catch the right type of exception? –  Sam Holder Apr 23 '10 at 14:17
6  
Consider catching exceptions at the proper level of abstraction, e.g. IOException, etc. instead of the too vague Exception. –  JRL Apr 23 '10 at 14:20
1  
I think that for this case, don't matter which Exception is thrown. Or why would? –  Tom Brito Apr 23 '10 at 17:02
3  
Please note that your code does not necessarily close in, see stackoverflow.com/questions/2441853/… –  meriton Apr 27 '10 at 21:11
    
@meriton Thanks! –  Tom Brito Apr 28 '10 at 14:03
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9 Answers

up vote 27 down vote accepted

This is the correct idom (and it works fine):

   InputStream in = null;
   OutputStream out = null;
   try {
       in = new FileInputStream(inputFileName);
       out = new FileOutputStream(outputFileName);
       copy(in, out);
   finally {
       close(in);
       close(out);
   }

  public static void close(Closeable c) {
     if (c == null) return; 
     try {
         c.close();
     } catch (IOException e) {
         //log the exception
     }
  }

The reason this works fine is that the exception thrown before you got to finally will be thrown after your finally code finishes, provided that your finally code doesn't itself throw an exception or otherwise terminate abnormally.

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2  
Note: this is not the correct idiom for all stream types. If the OutputStream buffers data (BufferedOutputStream) or it writes closing blocks (ZipOutputStream), you could lose data and the application would not handle it because it swallows exceptions. Logging is not a replacement for correct error handling. –  McDowell Jun 15 '10 at 12:09
    
@McDowell, it is a good point regarding the output stream (see my comment to Adamski's answer that said something similar), however I would still say it is the standard idiom. –  Yishai Jun 15 '10 at 15:04
    
Since this is the accepted answer and people will look at it - and since you agree with @McDowell please address his comment in your answer - -in the catch block –  Mr_and_Mrs_D May 2 '13 at 21:16
    
@Mr_and_Mrs_D, I don't know, with Java 6 end of life, the real answer is to use the Java 7 options, it certainly will be soon enough. I am loath to remake answers that got upvotes and acceptance on a different premise. –  Yishai May 2 '13 at 21:57
    
Right - but much of what is going will keep being Java 6 - Android for one thing... –  Mr_and_Mrs_D May 2 '13 at 21:58
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You could implement a utility method:

public final class IOUtil {
  private IOUtil() {}

  public static void closeQuietly(Closeable... closeables) {
    for (Closeable c : closeables) {
        if (c != null) try {
          c.close();
        } catch(Exception ex) {}
    }
  }
}

Then your code would be reduced to:

try {
  copy(in, out);
} finally {
  IOUtil.closeQuietly(in, out);
}

Additional

I imagine there'll be a method like this in a 3rd party open-source library. However, my preference is to avoid unnecessary library dependencies unless I'm using a large portion of its functionality. Hence I tend to implement simple utility methods like this myself.

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this is slightly different, as the in exception is not rethrown –  Sam Holder Apr 23 '10 at 14:19
    
@Sam: It's a good point; I'll amend my answer. –  Adamski Apr 23 '10 at 14:20
6  
I'd add a nullcheck. The closeable resource may not have been assigned. To the OP: the Commons IO library has similar methods: commons.apache.org/io/api-1.4/org/apache/commons/io/… –  BalusC Apr 23 '10 at 14:22
3  
You want to close the output stream "quietly"?! –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Apr 23 '10 at 14:25
3  
Why would the Java developers raise an exception if it is just to be ignored? –  Tom Brito Apr 27 '10 at 20:04
show 10 more comments
try {
    final InputStream in = new FileInputStream(inputFileName);
    try {
        final OutputStream out = new FileOutputStream(outputFileName);    
        try {
            copy(in, out);
            out.flush(); // Doesn't actually do anything in this specific case.
        } finally {
            out.close();
        }
    } finally {
        in.close();
    }
} catch (IOException exc) {
    throw new SomeRelevantException(exc);
}

Remember that opening a stream may throw an exception, so you do need a try between the stream openings (please don't do some hack involving nulls. Anything can throw an Error (which are not an instances of Exception).

It turns out that catch and finally should rarely share the same try.

Since Java SE 7 you can write use try-with-resource to avoid so much indentation. It more or less does the same thing although there are suppressed exception hidden away.

try (
    final InputStream in = new FileInputStream(inputFileName);
    final OutputStream out = new FileOutputStream(outputFileName);    
) {
    copy(in, out);
    out.flush(); // Doesn't actually do anything in this specific case.
} catch (IOException exc) {
    throw new SomeRelevantException(exc);
}

You may want to use the Execute Around idiom.

I believe the standard good way to copy is using NIO's transferTo/transferFrom.

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+1, that's identical (character-for-character) to the answer I was typing! :) –  Adam Paynter Apr 23 '10 at 14:21
    
Very nice actually - could you please comment on the benefits of it compared to the accepted answer ? Also if say copy(in, out); and out.close(); both throw won't we loose the exception thrown by copy(in, out); ? –  Mr_and_Mrs_D May 2 '13 at 23:39
    
@Mr_and_Mrs_D Kind of. In practice unbuffered I/O streams do not throw IOException from close. Even if they did throw IOException, the control flow would be the same. / Java SE 7 adds suppressed exceptions. I don't expect anyone to search through the suppressed tree to find the right exception, which isn't even really theoretically possible to do locally as there is not a defined ordering on exception priority. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline May 3 '13 at 10:16
    
Thanks - still wouldn't the answer be more complete if you caught the close() exception and log it ? –  Mr_and_Mrs_D May 3 '13 at 14:36
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Guava has very nice IO APIs that eliminate the need for this. For instance, your example would be:

Files.copy(new File(inputFileName), new File(outputFileName));

More generally, it uses the concept of InputSuppliers and OutputSuppliers to allow the InputStreams and OutputStreams to be created within its utility methods, allowing it full control over them so it can handle closing properly.

Additionally, it has Closeables.closeQuietly(Closeable) which is basically the type of method most of the answers have suggested.

The IO stuff in it is still in beta and subject to change, but it's worth checking out and even using, depending on what it is you're working on.

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You have, in commons io, in IOUtils, some closeQuietly methods.

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One trick I sometimes use is to define a method called closeQuietly(Closeable) that tests to see if its argument is null then closes it, ignoring any exceptions. But you need to be a careful closing OutputStreams and Writers that way because they may actually throw an exception that matters; e.g. if the final flush fails.

Things are likely to improve with Java 7. Reports are that it will have a new construct that provides a more concise way of handling managed resources; e.g. streams that need to be closed when they are finished with.

Finally, you should be aware that your example has a bug. If the method call to open the second stream, the first stream will not be closed. The second open needs to be done inside the try block.

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I strongly believe that in Java 7.0, you do not need to explicitly close the stream yourself anymore. Language Features in Java 7

try (BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(path)) {
   return br.readLine();
}
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When it's finally released, this will be terrific. You can specify multiple resources in the try(...) parameters, which are closed cleany for you by the JVM. –  Sam Barnum Apr 23 '10 at 17:18
3  
Although if the BufferedReader constructor fails (unlikely but does happen) you will leak. Also you are picking up the randomly confugured character encoding. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 29 '11 at 14:36
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In most cases the 'in' close() exception is irrelevant, so:

    try {
      copy(in, out);
    } finally {
    try {  in.close()  }  catch (Exception e) { /* perhaps log it */ }
    try {  out.close() }  catch (Exception e) {/* perhaps log it */ }
    } 

It's usually bad practice to swallow exceptions, but in this case I think it's ok.

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Why would ignoring a failure to write out the end of the file be ok? –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 29 '11 at 14:32
    
Because you know that it's a ByteArrayOutputStream? –  bmargulies Jan 17 '12 at 11:30
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In C#, there is using construction that closes closable objects automatically, when we leave the scope:

using(Stream s = new Stream(filename)) {
  s.read();
}

I think that this is a short form for java's try-finally block. Java 6 has introduced the Closable interface. So, using is almost there. When the final step is done in Java 7, it will be terrific indeed.

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