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I have an HTML page like so:

<html>
<body>
<div id='something'>
    ...
    <script>
    var x = 'hello world';
    </script>
    ...
</div>
</body>
</html>

On another page, I am doing this:

$.ajax({
    url: 'example.html',
    type: 'GET',
    success: function(data) {
        $('#mydiv').html($(data).find('#something').html());
        alert(x);
    }
});

jQuery, however, is not executing the javascript in the first file, even though the documentation says it does. How can I make it do that?

EDIT: Unfortunately in the real world application I am working on I don't have control over what the "included" page has. We are on the same domain, but I can't modify the code that it outputs as it is a packaged product our IT department will not let us modify.

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Have you checked to see what happens if you do an alert() in the script itself (that is, inside the "included" page)? –  Pointy Apr 23 '10 at 14:35
    
Well if you can't change it, you can check my theory by adding some debug code to see what $(data).html() looks like. If that doesn't contain the script tags, then that's the problem. You might want to look in the jQuery source and see what it does to strip scripts; it uses a fairly ugly regex but maybe you could strip the scripts yourself and then execute them. –  Pointy Apr 23 '10 at 15:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 27 down vote accepted

As Pointy pointed out (excuse the pun), jQuery messes with the SCRIPT tags when you pass HTML to $(). It doesn't remove them though -- it simply adds them to the DOM collection produced from your HTML. You can execute the scripts like so:

$.ajax({
    url: 'example.html',
    type: 'GET',
    success: function(data) {

        var dom = $(data);

        dom.filter('script').each(function(){
            $.globalEval(this.text || this.textContent || this.innerHTML || '');
        });

        $('#mydiv').html(dom.find('#something').html());

    }
});
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1  
Genius. Thank you. –  Jose Jose Apr 23 '10 at 15:52
5  
It would be nice if jQuery exposed it's evalScript implementation. You could have then done dom.filter('script').each($.evalScript), which would handle scripts with src atttributes as well, same like the other dom manipulation methods do. –  Crescent Fresh Apr 23 '10 at 16:38
    
For me, It just works, if I do the dom.filter AFTER the replacement of the content. Seems logical to me, but differs from what seems to be a qualified answer (see above). Could someone correct this? –  ansi_lumen May 4 '13 at 16:29

As alternative to @James answer, the HTML string can be parsed with $.parseHTML(), by paying attention to add the boolean flag that includes the scripts to true:

$.ajax({
    url: 'example.html',
    type: 'GET',
    success: function(data) {

        var content = $($.parseHTML(data, document, true)).find('#something');
        $('#mydiv').html(content);

    }
});

in this way any scripts embedded in the downloaded text can be executed.

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1  
Thanks for the advice guari - this should be voted up as it's a more efficient option. –  eugene Dec 3 '13 at 0:43

I'm not totally sure about this, but it's possible that what's happening is that when jQuery builds up the fragment from $(data), the script tags are lost at that point.

If you can arrange for the included page to really be just a fragment:

<div id='something'>
  <!-- ... -->
  <script>var x = 'hello world';</script>
</div>

without any other surrounding stuff, then your success callback can do this:

success: function(data) {
  $('#mydiv').html(data);
}

Now those script tags will be noticed by the jQuery html() function, which explicitly looks for them and strips them out. It does however hold onto those script blocks, and it executes them after it finishes updating the target contents.

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I expect the first page is executing the JavaScript, however this is not accessible from the second page, so alert(x) will not work

If you want x returned, you'll have to output it to the AJAX response.

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Ah - I was about to say why this isn't the problem, but I think I just figured out what the deal is. –  Pointy Apr 23 '10 at 14:43

Solution 1:the server return exact content

$.ajax({
    url: 'example.html',
    type: 'GET',
    success: function(data) {

        $('#mydiv').html(data);

    }
});

Solution 2:use innerHTML

$.ajax({
    url: 'example.html',
    type: 'GET',
    success: function(data) {

        var dom = $(data);
        $('#mydiv').html(dom.find('#something')[0].innerHTML);

    }
});
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