Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

EDIT: I also have access to ESXLT functions.

I have two node sets of string tokens. One set contains values like these:

/Geography/North America/California/San Francisco
/Geography/Asia/Japan/Tokyo/Shinjuku

The other set contains values like these:

/Geography/North America/
/Geography/Asia/Japan/

My goal is to find a "match" between the two. A match is made when any string in set 1 begins with a string in set 2. For example, a match would be made between /Geography/North America/California/San Francisco and /Geography/North America/ because a string from set 1 begins with a string from set 2.

I can compare strings using wildcards by using a third-party extension. I can also use a regular expression all within an Xpath.

My problem is how do I structure the Xpath to select using a function between all nodes of both sets? XSL is also a viable option.

This XPATH:

count($set1[.=$set2])

Would yield the count of intersection between set1 and set2, but it's a 1-to-1 comparison. Is it possible to use some other means of comparing the nodes?

EDIT: I did get this working, but I am cheating by using some of the other third-party extensions to get the same result. I am still interested in other methods to get this done.

share|improve this question
    
So, in your above example, you want the count of matching items? So the above should return 2? –  Cory Foy Nov 6 '08 at 20:28
    
Yes, with my given example the count should be two. –  Zack The Human Nov 6 '08 at 21:05
    
Is a single XPath expression the only option? Would XSLT be acceptable? –  ChuckB Nov 7 '08 at 17:27
    
Yes, XSLT is also a viable option. I will update the question to reflect that. –  Zack The Human Nov 7 '08 at 18:14
    
Zack, There is a simple and pure XSLT 1.0 solution (no extensions needed) for finding the count of matches. See my answer. –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 5 '08 at 23:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This:

<xsl:variable name="matches" select="$set1[starts-with(., $set2)]"/>

will set $matches to a node-set containing every node in $set1 whose text value starts with the text value of a node in $set2. That's what you're looking for, right?

Edit:

Well, I'm just wrong about this. Here's why.

starts-with expects its two arguments to both be strings. If they're not, it will convert them to strings before evaluating the function.

If you give it a node-set as one of its arguments, it uses the string value of the node-set, which is the text value of the first node in the set. So in the above, $set2 never gets searched; only the first node in the list ever gets examined, and so the predicate will only find nodes in $set1 that start with the value of the first node in $set2.

I was misled because this pattern (which I've been using a lot in the last few days) does work:

<xsl:variable name="hits" select="$set1[. = $set2]"/>

But that predicate is using an comparison between node-sets, not between text values.

The ideal way to do this would be by nesting predicates. That is, "I want to find every node in $set1 for which there's a node in $set2 whose value starts with..." and here's where XPath breaks down. Starts with what? What you'd like to write is something like:

<xsl:variable name="matches" select="$set1[$set2[starts-with(?, .)]]"/>

only there's no expression you can write for the ? that will return the node currently being tested by the outer predicate. (Unless I'm missing something blindingly obvious.)

To get what you want, you have to test each node individually:

<xsl:variable name="matches">
  <xsl:for-each select="$set1">
    <xsl:if test="$set2[starts-with(current(), .)]">
      <xsl:copy-of select="."/>
    </xsl:if>
  </xsl:for-each>
</xsl:variable>

That's not a very satisfying solution because it evaluates to a result tree fragment, not a node-set. You'll have to use an extension function (like msxsl:node-set) to convert the RTF to a node-set if you want to use the variable in an XPath expression.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes! What a simple and elegant solution. This is just what I needed -- thanks very much! –  Zack The Human Nov 7 '08 at 22:39
    
I did indeed speak too soon as ChuckB's post shows. Luckily for me, the third-party extensions I'm using allow me to solve this problem in another way. –  Zack The Human Nov 21 '08 at 5:17
    
Robert, There is a simple and pure XSLT 1.0 solution (no extensions needed) for finding the count of matches. See my answer. –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 5 '08 at 23:15

There is a simple and pure XSLT 1.0 solution (no extensions needed) for finding the count of matches:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output method="text"/>

    <xsl:template match="/">
      <xsl:variable name="vStars">
    	  <xsl:for-each select="*/regions/*">
    	    <xsl:for-each select="/*/cities/*[starts-with(.,current())]">
    	      <xsl:value-of select="'*'"/>
    	    </xsl:for-each>
    	  </xsl:for-each>
      </xsl:variable>

      <xsl:value-of select="string-length($vStars)"/>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the following XML document:

<t>
    <cities>
    	<city>/Geography/North America/California/San Francisco</city>
    	<city>/Geography/Asia/Japan/Tokyo/Shinjuku</city>
    </cities>
    <regions>
    	<region>/Geography/North America/</region>
    	<region>/Geography/Asia/Japan/</region>
    </regions>
</t>

the correct result is produced:

2

Do note that one character (an asterisk) is produced for every match found and all these asterisks form the content of the $vStars variable. We then simply output its string-length().

share|improve this answer

Robert's last xsl:variable is good for getting a result tree fragment containing the matching text values, but unless (as he suggests) you use EXSLT or MS extensions to XSLT 1.0 to convert the RTF to a node set, you can't get a count of the matching text nodes.

Here is the XSLT stylesheet I mentioned in my prior response that recurs over the sample input document I gave to give a count of text nodes in set 1 for which a node in set 2 matches part or all of it:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
  xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

  <xsl:output indent="yes" method="text"/>

  <xsl:template match="/">
    <xsl:call-template name="count-matches">
      <xsl:with-param name="set1-node" select="sets/set[1]/text[1]"/>
      <xsl:with-param name="set2-node" select="sets/set[2]/text[1]"/>
      <xsl:with-param name="total-count" select="0"/>
    </xsl:call-template>
    <xsl:text>
</xsl:text>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template name="count-matches">
    <xsl:param name="set1-node"/>
    <xsl:param name="set2-node"/>
    <xsl:param name="total-count" select="0"/>
    <xsl:variable name="this-count">
      <xsl:choose>
        <xsl:when test="contains($set1-node, $set2-node)">
          <xsl:value-of select="1"/>
        </xsl:when>
        <xsl:otherwise>
          <xsl:value-of select="0"/>
        </xsl:otherwise>
      </xsl:choose>
    </xsl:variable>
    <xsl:choose>
      <xsl:when test="$set2-node/following-sibling::text">
        <xsl:call-template name="count-matches">
          <xsl:with-param name="set1-node"
                          select="$set1-node"/>
          <xsl:with-param name="set2-node"
                          select="$set2-node/following-sibling::text[1]"/>
          <xsl:with-param name="total-count"
                          select="$total-count + $this-count"/>
        </xsl:call-template>
      </xsl:when>
      <xsl:when test="$set1-node/following-sibling::text">
        <xsl:call-template name="count-matches">
          <xsl:with-param name="set1-node"
                          select="$set1-node/following-sibling::text[1]"/>
          <xsl:with-param name="set2-node"
                          select="$set2-node/preceding-sibling::text[last()]"/>
          <xsl:with-param name="total-count"
                          select="$total-count + $this-count"/>
        </xsl:call-template>
      </xsl:when>
      <xsl:otherwise>
        <xsl:value-of select="$total-count + $this-count"/>
      </xsl:otherwise>
    </xsl:choose>
  </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

Not particularly concise, but because XSLT does not let programmers assign new values to already-defined variables, recursion is often necessary. I don't see a way in XSLT 1.0 to get a count of the sort requested by Zack using xsl:for-each.

share|improve this answer
    
Chuck, There is a simple and pure XSLT 1.0 solution (no extensions needed) for finding the count of matches. See my answer –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 5 '08 at 23:33

I guess I couldn't make the XPath above work. I started with the following XML doc to initialize the two nodesets:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<sets>
  <set>
    <text>/Geography/North America/California/San Francisco</text>
    <text>/Geography/Asia/Japan/Tokyo/Shinjuku</text>
  </set>
  <set>
    <text>/Geography/North America/</text>
    <text>/Geography/Asia/Japan/</text>
  </set>
</sets>

I think this stylesheet ought to implement Robert's solution, but I only get a count of '1':

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

  <xsl:output method="text"/>

  <xsl:template match="/">
    <xsl:variable name="set1" select="sets/set[1]/text/text()"/>
    <xsl:variable name="set2" select="sets/set[2]/text/text()"/>
    <xsl:value-of select="count($set1[starts-with(., $set2)])"/>
    <xsl:text>
</xsl:text>
  </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

I did write a stylesheet that uses a recursive template and does produce the correct count of '2' with the given input doc, but it's far less elegant than Robert's answer. If only I could get the XPath to work--always wanting to learn.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.