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My input file is as below :

HEADER 
{ABC|*|DEF {GHI 0 1 0} {{Points {}}}}

{ABC|*|DEF {GHI 0 2 0} {{Points {}}}}

{ABC|*|XYZ:abc:def {GHI 0 22 0} {{Points {{F1 1.1} {F2 1.2} {F3 1.3} {F4 1.4}}}}}

{ABC|*|XYZ:ghi:jkl {JKL 0 372 0} {{Points {}}}}

{ABC|*|XYZ:mno:pqr {GHI 0 34 0} {{Points {}}}}

{
    ABC|*|XYZ:abc:pqr {GHI 0 68 0}
        {{Points {{F1 11.11} {F2 12.10} {F3 14.11} {F4 16.23}}}}
        }
TRAILER

I want to extract the file into an array as below :

$array[0] = "{ABC|*|DEF {GHI 0 1 0} {{Points {}}}}"

$array[1] = "{ABC|*|DEF {GHI 0 2 0} {{Points {}}}}"

$array[2] = "{ABC|*|XYZ:abc:def {GHI 0 22 0} {{Points {{F1 1.1} {F2 1.2} {F3 1.3} {F4 1.4}}}}}"

..
..

$array[5] = "{
    ABC|*|XYZ:abc:pqr {GHI 0 68 0}
        {{Points {{F1 11.11} {F2 12.10} {F3 14.11} {F4 16.23}}}}
        }"

Which means, I need to match the first opening curly brace with its closing curly brace and extract the string in between.

I have checked the below link, but this doesnt apply to my question. http://stackoverflow.com/questions/413071/regex-to-get-string-between-curly-braces-i-want-whats-between-the-curly-braces

I am trying but would really help if someone can assist me with their expertise ...

Thanks Sri ...

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7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This can certainly be done with regex at least in modern versions of Perl:

my @array = $str =~ /( \{ (?: [^{}]* | (?0) )* \} )/xg;

print join "\n" => @array;

The regex matches a curly brace block that contains either non curly brace characters, or a recursion into itself (matches nested braces)

Edit: the above code works in Perl 5.10+, for earlier versions the recursion is a bit more verbose:

my $re; $re = qr/ \{ (?: [^{}]* | (??{$re}) )* \} /x;

my @array = $str =~ /$re/xg;
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Tried this, but I get the error Sequence (?0...) not recognized in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/( \{ (?: [^{}]* | (?0 <-- HERE ) )* \} )/ –  Srilesh Apr 23 '10 at 18:17
    
@Srilesh => the code I posted required perl 5.10+, i have edited my answer to include a version that will work in older perls. –  Eric Strom Apr 23 '10 at 20:04
    
Solutions provided by @ysth, @Zaid, @leonbloy works fine for me, but @eric's solution has very good performance. I am applying the recursion on a 10MB file and the result is really fast compared to the others. Choosing your answer to be the best solution here. Thank you very much. –  Srilesh Apr 23 '10 at 20:26
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Use Text::Balanced

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Thanks ysth, this is the best solution !! –  Srilesh Apr 23 '10 at 18:30
    
@Srilesh: if you like this answer best, please click the outlined checkmark to the left of the answer. –  Ether Apr 23 '10 at 18:34
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I second ysth's suggestion to use the Text::Balanced module. A few lines will get you on your way.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Text::Balanced qw/extract_multiple extract_bracketed/;

my $file;
open my $fileHandle, '<', 'file.txt';

{ 
  local $/ = undef; # or use File::Slurp
  $file = <$fileHandle>;
}

close $fileHandle;

my @array = extract_multiple(
                               $file,
                               [ sub{extract_bracketed($_[0], '{}')},],
                               undef,
                               1
                            );

print $_,"\n" foreach @array;

OUTPUT

{ABC|*|DEF {GHI 0 1 0} {{Points {}}}}
{ABC|*|DEF {GHI 0 2 0} {{Points {}}}}
{ABC|*|XYZ:abc:def {GHI 0 22 0} {{Points {{F1 1.1} {F2 1.2} {F3 1.3} {F4 1.4}}}}}
{ABC|*|XYZ:ghi:jkl {JKL 0 372 0} {{Points {}}}}
{ABC|*|XYZ:mno:pqr {GHI 0 34 0} {{Points {}}}}
{
    ABC|*|XYZ:abc:pqr {GHI 0 68 0}
        {{Points {{F1 11.11} {F2 12.10} {F3 14.11} {F4 16.23}}}}
        }
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Based on ysth's suggestion, i used Text::Balanced, but I was getting only the first match. Thanks for helping me here, I need to use the extract_multiple sub too. Thank you .. –  Srilesh Apr 23 '10 at 18:29
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I don't think pure regular expressions are what you want to use here (IMHO this might not even be parsable using regex).

Instead, build a small parser, similar to what's shown here: http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=308039 (see the asnwer by shotgunefx (Parson) on Nov 18, 2003 at 18:29 UTC)

UPDATE It seems it might be doable with a regex - I saw a referense to matching nested parenthesis in Mastering Regular Expressions (that's avialable on Google Books and thus can be googled for if you don't have the book - see Chapter 5, section "Matching balanced sets of parentheses")

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Thanks for driving me in the right direction. –  Srilesh Apr 23 '10 at 18:30
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You can always count braces:

my $depth = 0;
my $out = "";
my @list=();
foreach my $fr (split(/([{}])/,$data)) {
    $out .= $fr;
    if($fr eq '{') {
        $depth ++;
    }
    elsif($fr eq '}') {
        $depth --;
        if($depth ==0) {
            $out =~ s/^.*?({.*}).*$/$1/s; # trim
            push @list, $out;
            $out = "";
        }
    }
}
print join("\n==================\n",@list);

This is old, plain Perl style (and ugly, probably).

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This works fine. Thank you very much. –  Srilesh Apr 23 '10 at 18:19
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You're much better off using a state machine than a regex for this type of parsing.

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Why do you say that? –  Borodin Mar 8 '13 at 20:22
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Regular expressions are actually pretty bad for matching braces. Depending how deep you want to go, you could write a full grammar (which is a lot easier than it sounds!) for Parse::RecDescent. Or, if you just want to get the blocks, search through for opening '{' marks and closing '}', and just keep count of how many are open at any given time.

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Thanks zig, your response is very helpful. –  Srilesh Apr 23 '10 at 18:32
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