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With the following html, when I hover over child, I get a green background on parent. How can I stop that from happening? I do want the green background if I am hovering outside of the child element.

CSS3 is fine.

<style>
        .parent { padding: 100px; width: 400px; height:400px; }
        .parent:hover { background-color: green; }
        .child { padding: 100px; width: 200px; height:200px; }
        .child:hover { background-color: blue; }
</style>
<div class="parent">
        <div class="child">Child</div>
</div>
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5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

So this is REALLY ugly, but it works (kind of). I'm basically creating a duplicate of parent as a sibling of child. parent-overwrite is hidden by default, then displayed on the hover of child. Chrome doesn't like it unless you use the + selector instead of the ~ selector. This isn't very scalable, but it may work.

As the other guys posted, javascript would likely be a better solution.

<style>
    .parent { padding: 100px; width: 400px; height:400px; position: relative; z-index: 998; }
    .parent:hover { background-color: green; }
    .child { padding: 100px; width: 200px; height:200px; position: relative; z-index: 1000; }
    .child:hover { background-color: blue; }
    .parent-overwrite { padding: inherit; width: inherit; height: inherit; position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; z-index: 999; background-color: #FFF; display: none; }
    .child:hover ~ .parent-overwrite { display: block; }
</style>

<div class="parent">
    <div class="child">Child</div>
    <div class="parent-overwrite"></div>
</div>
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Thanks for trying :) But ya, because of the scalability this won't work for me. –  case nelson Apr 23 '10 at 19:41
    
Lol +1 for making it possible. –  Tilo Mitra Apr 23 '10 at 19:59
2  
Hahaha thanks, it was a fun problem to solve. I've totally run into this exact same problem before, but I think my solution was to manually change the class on the parent that didn't have a hover declaration. This wouldn't work for you though because you wanted the hover on your parent to work still. My programmer thought I was going to get severely down-voted for this ugly, ugly hack. Thanks for proving him wrong ;) –  Bryan Downing Apr 23 '10 at 21:58
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This is not possible using plain-vanilla CSS. You're asking for a pseudo-class of a child (child:hover) to affect the background declaration of a parent. There's no way to specify that sort of thing using regular css.

This can definitely be done using javascript.

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I'm not convinced this can't be done with CSS. I think I want to somehow change .parent:hover to only select if there are no child elements that have hover. This way the child would not affect the parent declaration, rather the parent selector would be more discerning. –  case nelson Apr 23 '10 at 18:17
    
No; that is precisely what the CSS designers have ruled out. It becomes near impossible to code, spec, and use that sort of model. In XPATH it is possible to use a parent selector, but there are no pseudo elements and classes to worry about there. It was a hard decision for them, but you cannot use CSS to allow child selectors to filter back up to affect the parent. –  Nicholas Wilson Apr 23 '10 at 20:14
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I can only do this with adding additional markup. An empty div needs to be added that essentially functions as the parent background. Take a look at the CSS here.

http://jsbin.com/ubiyo3/edit

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The easiest thing to do may be to use JS for this sort of CSS. Maybe you can try to rethink your implementation. Why are you trying to do something like this?

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I have a large tree of elements and some of them will respond to a mouse click. I only want the element that will respond to the click to be highlighted. Doing this in javascript will mean styling based on mouseover/mouseout and will considerably bloat the code base. –  case nelson Apr 23 '10 at 18:13
1  
It won't bloat the codebase - it will be about 4-5 lines of code, if you are using jQuery. In pseudocode: $('.parent').hover(function(){ ...set CSS to Green ...}); $('.child').hover(function(){ this.parent.css(..set css to white..}); –  Tilo Mitra Apr 23 '10 at 18:39
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I have what i think is a better solution, since it is scalable to more levels, as many as wanted, not only two or three.

I use borders, but it can also be done with whatever style wanted, like background-color.

With the border, the idea is to:

  • Have a different border color only one div, the div over where the mouse is, not on any parent, not on any child, so it can be seen only such div border in a different color while the rest stays on white.

You can test it at: http://jsbin.com/ubiyo3/13

And here is the code:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<meta charset=utf-8 />
<title>Hierarchie Borders MarkUp</title>
<style>

  .parent { display: block; position: relative; z-index: 0;
            height: auto; width: auto; padding: 25px;
          }

  .parent-bg { display: block; height: 100%; width: 100%; 
               position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 0px; 
               border: 1px solid white; z-index: 0; 
             }
  .parent-bg:hover { border: 1px solid red; }

  .child { display: block; position: relative; z-index: 1; 
           height: auto; width: auto; padding: 25px;
         }

  .child-bg { display: block; height: 100%; width: 100%; 
              position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 0px; 
              border: 1px solid white; z-index: 0; 
            }
  .child-bg:hover { border: 1px solid red; }

  .grandson { display: block; position: relative; z-index: 2; 
              height: auto; width: auto; padding: 25px;
            }

  .grandson-bg { display: block; height: 100%; width: 100%; 
                 position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 0px; 
                 border: 1px solid white; z-index: 0; 
               }
  .grandson-bg:hover { border: 1px solid red; }

</style>
</head>
<body>
  <div class="parent">
    Parent
    <div class="child">
      Child
      <div class="grandson">
        Grandson
        <div class="grandson-bg"></div>
      </div>
      <div class="child-bg"></div>
    </div>
    <div class="parent-bg"></div>
  </div>
</body>
</html>
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