Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Please don't mind that there is no insert fnc and that data are hardcoded. The main purpouse of it is to correctly implement iterator for this container.

//file Set.h
#pragma once

template<class T>
class Set
{
    template<class T>
    friend ostream& operator<<(ostream& out, const Set<T>& obj);
private:
    T** myData_;
    std::size_t mySize_;
    std::size_t myIndex_;
public:

    Set();
    class iterator : public std::iterator<std::random_access_iterator_tag, T*>
    {
    private:

        T** itData_;

    public:

        iterator(T** obj)
        {
            itData_ = obj;

        }

        T operator*() const
        {
            return **itData_;
        }
        /*Comparing values of two iterators*/
        bool operator<(const iterator& obj)
        {
            return **itData_ < **obj.itData_;
        }

        /*Substracting two iterators*/
        difference_type operator-(const iterator& obj)
        {
            return itData_ - obj.itData_;
        }

        /*Moving iterator backward for value*/
        iterator operator-(const int value)
        {
            return itData_ - value;
        }

        /*Adding two iterators*/
        difference_type operator+(const iterator& obj)
        {
            return itData_ + obj.itData_;
        }

        /*Moving iterator forward for value*/
        iterator operator+(const int value)
        {
            return itData_ + value;
        }

        bool operator!=(const iterator& obj)
        {
            return (itData_ != obj.itData_);
        }

        bool operator==(const iterator& obj)
        {
            return (itData_ == obj.itData_);
        }

        T** operator++()
        {
            return ++itData_;
        }

        T** operator--()
        {
            return --itData_;
        }
    };

    iterator begin() const
    {
        return myData_;
    }

    iterator end() const
    {
        return myData_ + myIndex_;
    }
};

template<class T>
ostream& operator<<(ostream& out, const Set<T>& obj)
{
    for (int i = 0;i < 3; ++i)
    {
        out << *obj.myData_[i] << "\n";
    }
    return out;
}

//file Set_impl.h
#pragma once
#include "stdafx.h"
#include "Set.h"

template<class T>
Set<T>::Set()
{
    mySize_ = 3;
    myIndex_ = 3;
    myData_ = new T*[mySize_];
    myData_[0] = new T(3);
    myData_[1] = new T(1);
    myData_[2] = new T(2);
}

//main
include "stdafx.h"
#include "Set_impl.h"

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    Set<int> a;
    Set<int>::iterator beg_ = a.begin();
    Set<int>::iterator end_ = a.end();
    std::sort(beg_,end_);//WONT SORT THIS RANGE
    cin.get();
    return 0;
}

Why sort can't accept this iterators even though I've provided all operators needed for sort to work? I think the best way to check what's going on is to paste this code and run it first. Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Not a complete answer, so I'll leave it as a comment only: An iterator's operator* should return the collection's reference type, not a value. Otherwise, there's now way for sort() to modify the values the iterator "points" to. – Éric Malenfant Apr 23 '10 at 19:09
    
@Eric after changes you've suggested I'm getting only one error: Error 5 error C2440: 'return' : cannot convert from 'double' to 'double &' Any idea why? – There is nothing we can do Apr 23 '10 at 19:25
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Your code is unfortunately a complete mess.

What prohibits it from compiling is probably the following:

class iterator : public std::iterator<std::random_access_iterator_tag, T*>

This says that when you perform *iterator, it yields a T*. But look at what operator* actually returns:

T operator*() const

I can make it compile by changing those to:

class iterator : public std::iterator<std::random_access_iterator_tag, T>

and

T& operator*() const

(in addition to numerous other changes since GCC doesn't seem to like this a lot)


    /*Comparing values of two iterators*/
    bool operator<(const iterator& obj)
    {
        return **itData_ < **obj.itData_;
    }

This is also wrong. It should be related to operators == and !=, that is, it shouldn't be comparing the values, but the iterators. (Luckily for you I doubt, std::sort actually ever uses this method.)

    T** operator++()
    {
        return ++itData_;
    }

    T** operator--()
    {
        return --itData_;
    }

These should return a reference to the iterator itself (again, the return value is most probably not used by the library).

share|improve this answer
    
@Uncle but T** operator++ and operator-- they do return reference to themself. – There is nothing we can do Apr 23 '10 at 19:22
    
That would be: iterator& operator++() { ++itData_; return *this; } – UncleBens Apr 23 '10 at 19:29
    
@Uncle but the result is the same only without conversions so I'm not sure if it actually better to specify the way you've suggested but of course I'm just asking not arguing. – There is nothing we can do Apr 23 '10 at 19:38
1  
No, there will be implicit conversions the way you do it. Consider usage: iterator a, b; a = ++b; If ++ returns a T**, then it must first be implicitly converted back to iterator before it can be assigned to a. (And in addition, in the middle you leak internal implementation details to the outside world.) – UncleBens Apr 23 '10 at 19:51
1  
Too bad, then. I can easily get it to compile and have it output 1, 2, 3. - I'm afraid it takes a psychic to know what might be wrong now. Perhaps ask another question? (SO is a bit bad for iteratively fixing coding errors, a forum such as cboard.cprogramming.com/cplusplus-programming might be more suitable.) – UncleBens Apr 23 '10 at 22:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.