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I'm trying to store a list of generic objects in a generic list, but I'm having difficulty declaring it. My object looks like:

public class Field<T>
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }
    public T Value { get; set; }

    /*
    ...
    */
}

I'd like to create a list of these. My problem is that each object in the list can have a separate type, so that the populated list could contain something like this:

{ Field<DateTime>, Field<int>, Field<double>, Field<DateTime> }

So how do I declare that?

List<Field<?>>

(I'd like to stay as typesafe as possible, so I don't want to use an ArrayList).

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It's an interesting idea to "stay as typesafe as possible", however, aren't you violating the en.wikipedia.org/wiki/YAGNI concept? Think about how are you going to access that list, do you really need it that specific? –  Fábio Batista Apr 23 '10 at 20:54
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3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

This is situation where it may benefit you to have an abstract base class (or interface) containing the non-generic bits:

public abstract class Field
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }
}

public class Field<T> : Field
{    
    public T Value { get; set; }

    /*
    ...
    */
}

Then you can have a List<Field>. That expresses all the information you actually know about the list. You don't know the types of the fields' values, as they can vary from one field to another.

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@Jon - Should the first class be a generic or just a simple class? –  Giorgi Apr 23 '10 at 20:42
1  
@Giorgi, abstract class Field<T> looks like a typo. I've taken the liberty of correcting it. –  Anthony Pegram Apr 23 '10 at 20:48
    
He still has to cast to get the actual value type... but this is about the only solution that I can think of too, without an actual "tuple" type. –  tames Apr 23 '10 at 20:50
    
@tames, he's in a better position because the elements of his list must inherit from Field (or implement IField, in my example). The list is still more strongly typed than a list of objects –  Anthony Pegram Apr 23 '10 at 20:52
    
Doh, thanks for the fix folks. Still not feeling well :( –  Jon Skeet Apr 23 '10 at 20:55
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Perhaps implement an interface.

interface IField
{
}

class Field<T> : IField
{
}

...

List<IField> fields = new List<IField>() { new Field<int>(), new Field<double>() };
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This leaves him in the same position because IField won't contain the type (T). Not a whole lot different from just using object because he'll still have to cast to get the value. –  tames Apr 23 '10 at 20:47
    
@tames, he's in a better position because the elements of his list must implement IField (or inherit from Field, in Jon's example). The list is still more strongly typed than a list of objects. –  Anthony Pegram Apr 23 '10 at 20:50
    
@anthony... I agree, and I have used both interface and base class solutions. –  tames Apr 23 '10 at 21:01
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You can't declare a list of generic types without knowing the generic type at compile time.

You can declare a List<Field<int>> or a List<Field<double>>, but there is no other common base type for Field<int> and Field<double> than object. So the only List<T> that could hold different kinds of fields would be List<object>.

If you want a more specific type for the list, you would have to make the Field<T> class inherit a class or implement an interface. Then you can use that for the generic type in the list.

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