Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know that drop removes the data as well as the table structure whereas truncate retains table structure.

Does drop/truncate write to roll back segment ?

share|improve this question
    
Your question is tagged both oracle and mysql. If you want your question to be answered for both of them, I think you should make this clear in your question. –  Peter Lang Apr 23 '10 at 20:50
    
just for oracle will do –  user319280 Apr 23 '10 at 20:56

3 Answers 3

In Oracle the answer is No, since the rollback segments are only used for DML.

TRUNCATE is DDL.

share|improve this answer
    
okay. 1 more question. I understand delete is DML, and truncate is DDL. given the table named employees, what is the difference between 1.delete from employees; and 2.truncate employees; when to use each ? –  user319280 Apr 23 '10 at 23:00
    
Truncate is a lot faster, partly because it doesn't generate rollback. This leads to at least two important differences: it can't be rolled back, obviously, and takes effect immediately, independently of a commit. Say you want to empty and repopulate a table. If you delete, insert, commit then the table is never empty as far as other users are concerned, and if you roll back the old data is restored. If you truncate, insert, commit then all other sessions see an empty table between the truncate and commit, which might cause problems, and if the insert fails and is rolled back, it stays empty. –  Alex Poole Apr 23 '10 at 23:53
    
The answer makes sense! –  user319280 Apr 24 '10 at 7:37
    
just for perfection, correct 2 as 2.truncate table employees –  user319280 Apr 24 '10 at 8:59

Each single DDL statement is a discrete transaction. This is because databases need manage their metadata (the data dictionary in Oracle). Basically it has to correct and valid all the time, so changes to the metadata cannot be rolled back. Consequently an implicit commit is issued before and after each DDL statement. This is applies to most, probably all, RDBMS products.

Both TRUNCATE TABLE and DROP TABLE are DDL statements are DDL, so there is no rollback. If we have an Enterprise Edition license for a recent version of Oracle we can use FLASHBACK TABLE to recover the table to a previous state, including BEFORE DROP.

edit

Here are the differences between DELETE and TRUNCATE TABLE. The example date is this big table:

SQL> exec dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(user,'BIG_TABLE')

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

SQL> select blocks, num_rows
  2  from user_tables
  3  where table_name = 'BIG_TABLE'
  4  /

    BLOCKS   NUM_ROWS
---------- ----------
     15449    2340320

SQL> 

Deletion first....

SQL> delete from big_table
  2  /

2340320 rows deleted.

Elapsed: 00:01:20.37
SQL>
SQL> exec dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(user,'BIG_TABLE')

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

Elapsed: 00:00:10.20
SQL>
SQL> select blocks, num_rows
  2  from user_tables
  3  where table_name = 'BIG_TABLE'
  4  /

    BLOCKS   NUM_ROWS
---------- ----------
     15449          0

Elapsed: 00:00:00.11
SQL>

And now the truncate ...

SQL> truncate table big_table reuse storage
  2  /

Table truncated.

Elapsed: 00:00:08.31
SQL> exec dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(user,'BIG_TABLE')

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

Elapsed: 00:00:00.26
SQL>
SQL> select blocks, num_rows
  2  from user_tables
  3  where table_name = 'BIG_TABLE'
  4  /

    BLOCKS   NUM_ROWS
---------- ----------
         0          0

Elapsed: 00:00:00.00
SQL>

The differences between are apparent. The TRUNCATE is much, much faster. Also it has zeroised the number of blocks in the table. Notice that even the gathering of statistics is faster after the truncation. This is because the TRUNCATE statement resets the high water mark, (i.e. the zero blocks), so the job knows all the assigned blocks are unused.

share|improve this answer

Both drop and truncate write to rollback segment.
You just cannot do rollback on your own because Oracle executes each DDL statement in separate transaction that is automatically started and commited.

It works like this:

begin
    COMMIT; -- any outstanding work
    begin
       DDL statement;
       COMMIT; -- the DDL statement
    exception
       when others then
            ROLLBACK;  -- any work done by the DDL
            RAISE;     -- reraise the exception back to the client
    end;
end;

In case of system crash in middle of DDL statement Oracle will be able to rollback interrupted operation.

Source of information: article on Ask Tom.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.