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I'm want a IDictionary<float, foo> that returns the larges values of the key first.

private IDictionary<float, foo> layers = new SortedDictionary<float, foo>(new DescendingComparer<float>());

class DescendingComparer<T> : IComparer<T> where T : IComparable<T>
{
    public int Compare(T x, T y)
    {
        return -y.CompareTo(x);
    }
}

However, this returns values in order of the smallest first. I feel like I'm making a stupid mistake here.

Just to see what would happen, I removed the - sign from the comparator:

    public int Compare(T x, T y)
    {
        return y.CompareTo(x);
    }

But I got the same result. This reinforces my intuition that I'm making a stupid error.

This is the code that accesses the dictionary:

foreach (KeyValuePair<float, foo> kv in sortedLayers)
{
    // ...
}

UPDATE: This works, but is too slow to call as frequently as I need to call this method:

IOrderedEnumerable<KeyValuePair<float, foo>> sortedLayers = layers.OrderByDescending(kv => kv.Key);
foreach (KeyValuePair<float, ICollection<IGameObjectController>> kv in sortedLayers) { 
    // ...
}

UPDATE: I put a break point in the comparator that never gets hit as I add and remove kv pairs from the dictionary. What could this mean?

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2  
I think you are confusing ascending with descending. Ascending is 1 2 3 4 5 (smallest value first), descending is 5 4 3 2 1 (largest value first). –  dtb Apr 23 '10 at 22:41
    
@dtb you are correct. –  Rosarch Apr 23 '10 at 22:42
    
y.CompareTo(x) should work for descending order. Why would it not? :o If you give few samples and output it will be easier to know. See reverse-sorted-dictionary-in-net –  nawfal Jun 15 at 10:28
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For descending order (largest values first), you would do -x.CompareTo(y)

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This doesn't work, but I feel like it should. Perhaps I'm doing something else wrong. –  Rosarch Apr 23 '10 at 22:41
    
@Rosarch: It definitely should work, I know I've used it before. If you debug your code, do you find that your Compare method is actually called? –  Michael Petito Apr 23 '10 at 22:46
    
Looks like it isn't, actually. Am I creating the SortedDictionary incorrectly? –  Rosarch Apr 23 '10 at 22:48
1  
@Rosarch: No, you are creating the dictionary correctly. Check to make sure that you are using the same dictionary you've constructed above later on in your code when adding/removing elements and enumerating. IE. Find all references to layers and make sure there isn't another piece of code assigning a different SortedDictionary. –  Michael Petito Apr 23 '10 at 22:59
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try:

public int Compare(T x, T y)
{
    return x.CompareTo(y);
}
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That still doesn't do it. hmm.. –  Rosarch Apr 23 '10 at 22:39
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In this line, switch x and y:

return -y.CompareTo(x);

Make it

return -x.CompareTo(y);
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