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I'm doing this to learn the syntax of different programming languages.

So, how would you defined the following class along with with its operations in your favorite programming language?

Fraction class

Image generated by http://yuml.me/

And a main method or equivalent to invoke it:

For instance, for Java it would be:

...
public static void main( String [] args ) {
    Fraction f = new Fraction();

    f.numerator( 2 );
    f.denominator( 5 );
    f.print();
    // using the "getters"
    int n = f.numerator();
    int d = f.denominator();
}
....

EDIT

This is not intended for production code!

The purpose is merely to learn from others how to write the most basic data structure.

I know and agree that immutability is much better and the class needs a "test-specification" to work properly and Fraction is already a core class in many languages. Forget about the semantics.

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4  
I didn't know about yuml.me, good one. –  Jorge Apr 23 '10 at 23:32
1  
I am sad that there isn't a brainf*ck one yet... do they even have classes? –  SeanJA Apr 23 '10 at 23:48
22  
This is terrible! Your specification only contains the method signatures (which are irrelevant), but not the behavior (which is what's actually interesting). There's no testsuite. Objects should be valid when they are constructed, but your specification not only doesn't require that, it actually makes it impossible to implement correctly. Numbers should be value types, again, your specification makes that impossible. Being able to set numerator and denominator individually is completely idiotic. Actually they shouldn't be modifiable at all. The spec makes it impossible to adhere to the ... –  Jörg W Mittag Apr 24 '10 at 0:36
8  
... Single Responsibility Principle. Most languages actually already have a Rational type either builtin (e.g. Clojure, Ioke, most Lisps), in the core library or in the standard library (Ruby, Python) -- thus it doesn't make sense to duplicate that funtionality. And last but certainly not least: the friggin' thing doesn't even do anything! You can't add, subtract, multiple, divide, square, ... your Rationals. –  Jörg W Mittag Apr 24 '10 at 0:38
6  
Jorg: I can't tell if you're joking. I guess that makes it funnier, right? –  Gabe Apr 24 '10 at 5:31
show 15 more comments

52 Answers

Punched Cards

*     *    *        *    *
*          *    *        *
      *    *    *
      *    *    *    *
*     *    *        *    *
*          *    *        *

Usage

   *  *    *    *    *    *
*          *    *        *
   *  *            *
                *    *
*     *    *        *     
*               *        *
share|improve this answer
3  
i think you got a syntax error in the Usage -- 4th column... –  RCIX Apr 24 '10 at 2:50
3  
-1 - This is NOT correct. You are assuming a DOS line ending - but you are using a Unix compiler :) –  Nathan Osman Apr 24 '10 at 3:52
24  
You should totally drop that and try punchQuery. :) –  Zach Johnson Apr 24 '10 at 7:05
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Python:

from fractions import Fraction
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11  
@George, this is the correct implementation in Python. –  Mike Graham Apr 24 '10 at 0:11
7  
True , but the OP asked for the class defintion. This ain't it. –  Nathan Osman Apr 24 '10 at 0:17
11  
Guys! GUYS!!! This is a tongue-in-cheek answer meant to make you smirk and if, to serve as a serious response, to indicate, "In Python we rely on the same standard, high-quality implementations of what we need rather than cobbling together a half-featured, buggy implementation ourselves." –  Mike Graham Apr 24 '10 at 0:22
3  
@Steve, a) You are so hopelessly literal and rigid, b) from sympy import Rational, c) thhhhhhhhpbt. –  Mike Graham Apr 24 '10 at 0:29
4  
+1 I liked the joke and I think it's sad that Mike had to explain it. –  ssg Apr 24 '10 at 0:34
show 10 more comments

C ;-)

#include <stdio.h>

struct Fraction {
    int numerator;
    int denominator;
};

void Fraction_print(const struct Fraction *f) {
    printf("%d/%d\n", f->numerator, f->denominator);
}

int main() {
    struct Fraction f = {1, 2};
    Fraction_print(&f);
    f.numerator = 2;
    f.denominator = 3;
    Fraction_print(&f);
    return 0;
}

Obviously if you want to do stuff like reduce to simplest form in the setters, you can define those as functions too.

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3  
in Fraction_print you want to use -> instead of the dot operator to access the pointer struct members, since f is a pointer. –  Luca Matteis Apr 24 '10 at 4:05
1  
You should typedef the struct into an abstract data type, that gives you more of a 'class' type to work with. In real C you would also hide the struct internals in a .c file so the programmer using your type can't access the members. –  Mike Weller May 5 '10 at 9:10
2  
I've heard of C++. I've I've heard of C#. I've heard of C*. I've even heard of C--...but I've never heard of C;-). –  Mike Graham Oct 2 '10 at 0:24
show 8 more comments

Ruby:

class Fraction
  attr_accessor :numerator, :denominator

  def print
    "#{numerator}/#{denominator}"
  end
end

f = Fraction.new
f.numerator = 2
f.denominator = 3
f.print # => "2/3"
n = f.numerator
d = f.denominator
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Haskell

data Fraction = F { num :: Integer, den :: Integer }
                deriving (Show)
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5  
Demominator? I think you have a typo there –  Charlie Somerville Apr 24 '10 at 4:26
2  
A bit! Thanks, the problem is now fixed. –  troutwine Apr 24 '10 at 6:31
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F#: lots of different ways to make classes:

Vanilla class:

type Fraction(numerator : int, denominator : int) =
    member this.Numerator = numerator
    member this.Denominator = denominator
    override this.ToString() = sprintf "%i / %i" numerator denominator

let f = new Fraction(2, 3)

Record:

type fraction = { numerator : int; denominator : int }
    with
        override this.ToString() = sprintf "%i / %i" this.numerator this.denominator

let f = { numerator = 2; denominator = 3 }

Union:

type fraction = Fraction of int * int
    with
        member this.Numerator = match this with Fraction(x, y) -> x
        member this.Denominator = match this with Fraction(x, y) -> y
        override this.ToString() = match this with Fraction(x, y) -> sprintf "%i / %i" x y

let f = Fraction(2, 3)

Usage:

printfn "%O" f
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You know what you don't see anymore?

SIMULA

Begin
    Class Fraction (Numerator, Denominator) Integer Numerator, Denominator;
    Begin
        Procedure Print;
        Begin
            OutInt(Numerator,7);OutChar('/');OutInt(Denominator,7);OutImage
        End;
    End;

    Ref(Fraction) F;
    F :- New Fraction(2,3);
    F.Print
End;

Take with a pinch of salt. This is based on my 25 year old recollection.

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4  
There's something wrong with us, something very, very wrong with us. Something seriously wrong with us - we're programmers. –  uncle brad Apr 24 '10 at 1:35
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C++

#include <iostream>

class Fraction
{
    int m_numerator;
    int m_denominator;
public:
    Fraction(int numerator, int denominator) 
        : m_numerator(numerator)
        , m_denominator(denominator) {
    }
    void SetNumerator(int val) {
        m_numerator = val;
    }
    void SetDenominator(int val) {
        m_denominator = val;
    }
    int GetNumerator() const {
        return m_numerator;
    }
    int GetDenominator() const {
        return m_denominator;
    }
    void print() const {
        std::cout << m_numerator << "/" << m_denominator;
    }
};

// Main method - Entry point
int main()
{
    // declare an instance of the class
    Fraction f(5,5);
    f.print();
}
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1  
:) This also means you should add getters for numerator and denominator (as the UML up there says)... –  Kotti Apr 23 '10 at 23:32
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I guess I'd actually want to write something like this in Java:

public final class Fraction implements Comparable<Fraction> {
    private final int num;
    private final int den;

    private Fraction(int num, int den) {
        if (den == 0) {
            throw new ArithmeticException();
        }
        int gcd = gcd(num, den); // To do...
        this.num = num/gcd;
        this.den = den/gcd;
    }
    public static Fraction of(int num, int den) {
        return new Fraction(num, den);
    }

    public int numerator() {
        return num;
    }
    public int denominator() {
        return den;
    }

    @Override public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (!(obj instanceof Fraction)) {
            return false;
        }
        Fraction other = (Fraction)obj;
        return this.num == other.num && this.den == other.den;
    }
    @Override public int hashCode() 
        int h = den;
        h = h*41 + num;
        return h;
    }
    @Override public String toString() {
        return num+"@"+den;
    }

    public int compareTo(Fraction other) {
        return Longs.compare( // To do...
            this.num*(long)other.den,
            other.num*(long)this.den
        );
    }
}

...

public static void main(String [] args) {
    Fraction fraction = Fraction.of(2, 5);
    System.out.println(fraction)

    // using the "getters"
    int num = fraction.numerator();
    int den = fraction.denominator();
}

There is a suggest that Java should have direct support to make immutable values simpler.

What actually get written:

public class Fraction implements Serializable {
    public int numerator, denominator;
}

(See java.awt.Point.)

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4  
I think we should create a fraction interface and another concrete class that allows it both ways so that we can dependency inject the values. Let's create a factory and update our XML files. –  GreenieMeanie May 4 '10 at 16:42
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LOL

HAI
CAN HAS STDIO?

LET ME SHOW U MAI FARCTION
I HAS A NUMBAR ITZ "NOM" ALWAIZ
I HAS A NUMBAR ITZ "NOMNOM" ALWAIZ
KTHX

KTHXBYE
HAI

I HAS A MUDKIP ITZ A FARCTION
LOL MUDKIP NOM R 2
LOL MUDKIP NOMNOM R 5

MUDKIP SEZ NOM "/" NOMNOM
KTHX

KTHXBYE
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Common Lisp (which already has a rational type)

(defclass fraction ()
  (
   (numer :accessor numer :initarg :numer :initform 0 :type integer)
   (denom :accessor denom :initarg :denom :initform 1 :type integer)
   ) )

(defmethod print-object ((r fraction) stream)
  (format stream "~A/~A" (numer r) (denom r) ))

(defvar f (make-instance 'fraction :numer 2 :denom 5))
(print-object f t)
(defvar n (numer f))
(defvar d (numer d))

;; Not necessary, but somewhat useful
(defun make-fraction (&optional (n 0) (d 1) &rest initargs) 
  (declare (type integer n d))
  (apply #'make-instance 'fraction :numer n :denom d initargs))
(defvar half (make-fraction 1 2))
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32-bit x86 assembly using MASM (as best as I can remember, and it calls printf() to do the printing):

.model flat

Fraction STRUCT
  numerator DWORD ?
  denominator DWORD ?
Fraction ENDS

.const
fraction_print_format db "%d/%d",0

.code

;void _stdcall Fraction_SetNumerator(Fraction*p,unsigned int v);
public _Fraction_SetNumerator
  pop ebx
  pop eax
  pop (Fraction ptr [eax]).numerator
  jmp ebx

;void _stdcall Fraction_SetDenominator(Fraction*p,unsigned int v);
public _Fraction_SetDenominato
  pop ebx
  pop eax
  pop (Fraction ptr [eax]).denominator
  jmp ebx

;int _stdcall Fraction_GetNumerator(const Fraction*p);
public _Fraction_GetNumerator
  pop ebx
  pop eax
  mov eax,(Fraction ptr [eax]).numerator
  jmp ebx

;int _stdcall Fraction_GetDenominator(const Fraction*p);
public _Fraction_GetDenominator
  pop ebx
  pop eax
  mov eax,(Fraction ptr [eax]).denominator
  jmp ebx

;void _stdcall Fraction_Print(const Fraction*p);
public _Fraction_Print
  mov eax,[esp+4]
  push (Fraction ptr [eax]).denominator
  push (Fraction ptr [eax]).numerator
  push offset fraction_print_format
  call _printf
  add esp,12
  retf 8
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Objective-C, using synthesized properties:

@interface Fraction : NSObject {
    int numerator;
    int denominator;
}

@property (assign) int numerator;
@property (assign) int denominator;
- (id)initWithNumerator:(int)theNumerator denominator:(int)theDenominator;
- (void) print;

@end

@implementation Fraction

@synthesize numerator, denominator; //implements getters and setters

- (id)initWithNumerator:(int)theNumerator denominator:(int)theDenominator {
    self = [super init];
    if (!self)
        return nil;

    numerator = theNumerator;
    denominator = theDenominator;

    return self;
}

- (id)init {
    return [self initWithNumerator:0 denominator:1];
}

- (NSString *) description { //equivalent of toString() in Java
    return [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d/%d", self.numerator, self.denominator];
}    

- (void) print {
    NSLog(@"%@", self);
}

@end

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    Fraction f = [[Fraction alloc] init];
    f.numerator = 2;
    f.denominator = 5;
    [f print];
    int n = f.numerator;
    int d = f.denominator;
    [f release];

    return 0;
}
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JavaScript:

function Fraction(numerator, denominator) {
    this._numerator = numerator;
    this._denominator = denominator;
}

Fraction.prototype.numerator = function(value) {
    if (typeof value !== 'undefined') {
        this._numerator = value;
    }
    return this._numerator;
};

Fraction.prototype.denominator = function(value) {
    if (typeof value !== 'undefined') {
        this._denominator = value;
    }
    return this._denominator;
};

Fraction.prototype.print = function() {
    alert(this.numerator() + '/' + this.denominator());
};

var f = new Fraction(1,2);
f.print();
f.numerator(5);
f.denominator(11);
f.print();

var n = f.numerator();
var d = f.denominator();

alert(n + '/' + d);
​
share|improve this answer
1  
Doesn't a cat dies every time you place the open brace like that in Javascript? I remember there was something about Javascript and placing the brace in a different line. –  OscarRyz Apr 24 '10 at 0:39
8  
Cats have 9 lives, and I only used 8 braces :) –  Neil McGuigan Apr 24 '10 at 0:42
8  
Disgusting. Learn how to use prototypes. –  Thomas Eding Apr 24 '10 at 6:05
3  
Prototypes are useful to minimize memory footprint, however there is only one instance of this class, so it is not an issue in this example. Unfortunately, prototypes prevent true encapsulation, in that you cannot have private member variables. Therefore, this implementation is more OOP. see crockford.com/javascript/private.html –  Neil McGuigan Apr 26 '10 at 21:56
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Another Javascript implementation, using prototype, getters and setters:

function Fraction(n, d) {
    this.numerator = n;
    this.denominator = d;
}

Fraction.prototype = {
    get numerator() { return this.numer; },
    set numerator(n) { this.numer = n; },
    get denominator() { return this.denom; },
    set denominator(d) { this.denom = d; },
    toString: function () {
        return this.numerator + '/' + this.denominator;
    }
};

var f = new Fraction();
f.numerator = 2;
f.denominator = 5;
f + ''
var n = f.numerator;
var d = f.denominator;
share|improve this answer
2  
I didn't know you could do that in JavaScript! What version do you need? –  Joey Adams Apr 24 '10 at 4:50
1  
@Joey - It's ECMAScript 5. –  Jimmy Cuadra Apr 24 '10 at 9:37
1  
@el chief: there are only two member variables, number and denom. numerator and denominator are accessors (accessed like data properties, but implemented like functions). –  outis Nov 30 '10 at 9:43
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Surprising no one posted this yet: Pascal (Object Pascal dialect)

program fractions;

type
    { Type declaration }
    Fraction = object

        private
            numerator : integer;
            denominator: integer;


        public
            procedure setNumerator (value : integer);
            function  getNumerator : integer;
            procedure setDenominator (value : integer);
            function  getDenominator : integer; 

            procedure print;
        end;


{ numerator setter }
procedure Fraction.setNumerator (value : integer);
begin
    self.numerator := value
end;


{ numerator getter }
function Fraction.getNumerator : integer;
begin
    getNumerator := numerator;
end;


{ denominator setter }
procedure Fraction.setDenominator (value : integer);
begin
    self.denominator := value;
end;


{ denominator getter }
function Fraction.getDenominator : integer;
begin
    getDenominator := denominator;
end;


{ print fraction on screen }
procedure Fraction.print;
begin
    write (self.numerator);
    write (' / ');
    write (self.denominator);
    writeln;
end;


{ Main program }
{ BTW, for those who never programmed Pascal before, those are comments;) }   
var
    f : Fraction;
    n,d : integer;

begin
    f.setNumerator (2);
    f.setDenominator (5);
    f.print;

    n := f.getNumerator;
    d := f.getDenominator;
end.
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C - Better abstraction and encapsulation than the others

I'm not satisfied with the versions in C that I've seen. We should use an abstract typedef and private struct thusly:

fraction.h

#ifndef FRACTION_H
#define FRACTION_H

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif

struct Fraction_private;
typedef struct Fraction_private Fraction;

Fraction *FractionCreate(int numerator, int denominator);
void FractionDestroy(Fraction *fraction);
int FractionGetNumerator(Fraction *fraction);
int FractionGetDenominator(Fraction *fraction);
void FractionPrint(Fraction *fraction);

#ifdef __cplusplus
} // extern
#endif

#endif

fraction.c

#include "fraction.h"
#include <assert.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

struct Fraction_private {
        int numerator;
        int denominator;
};

Fraction *FractionCreate(int numerator, int denominator) {
        Fraction *result = malloc(sizeof(*result));
        result->numerator = numerator;
        result->denominator = denominator;
        return result;
}

void FractionDestroy(Fraction *fraction) {
        free(fraction);
}

int FractionGetNumerator(Fraction *fraction) {
        assert(fraction);
        return fraction->numerator;
}

int FractionGetDenominator(Fraction *fraction) {
        assert(fraction);
        return fraction->denominator;
}

void FractionPrint(Fraction *fraction) {
        assert(fraction);
        printf("%d/%d", fraction->numerator, fraction->denominator);
}

Example use:

#include "fraction.h"
#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
        Fraction *f = FractionCreate(2, 4);
        printf("Numerator is %d, denominator is %d\n",
                FractionGetNumerator(f),
                FractionGetDenominator(f));

        printf("Using the print function: ");
        FractionPrint(f);
        printf("\n");

        FractionDestroy(f);
        return 0;
}

Now this looks much cleaner and abstract doesn't it? In fact, when you get down to it, this C is very much like object-oriented languages, just with a different syntax. Private members are inaccessible, and we can only manipulate the type using the predefined functions. We just happen to pass an explicit 'this' argument to each function.

Of course, in a real application a datatype this simple would probably be implemented as a struct on the stack like other solutions have done. But I though this would be nice for people to see that C can in fact do some nice abstract types.

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Perl 5

Man, I'm super rusty on object-oriented Perl and I wouldn't say it's my favourite language by a long shot, but since no-one else has done it yet...

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

package Fraction;
sub new {
    my $class = shift;

    my $this = {};
    $this->{numerator} = shift;
    $this->{denominator} = shift;
    bless($this, $class);
    return $this;
}

sub numerator {
    return shift->{numerator};
}
sub denominator {
    return shift->{denominator};
}
sub set_numerator { 
    my ($this, $num) = @_;
    $this->{numerator} = $num;
}
sub set_denominator {
    my ($this, $den) = @_;
    $this->{denominator} = $den;
}
sub str {
    my $this = shift;
    return sprintf("%s / %s", $this->numerator(), $this->denominator());
}


package Main;

my $f = Fraction->new(1, 2);
print $f->str(), "\n";
$f->set_numerator(2);
$f->set_denominator(5);
print $f->str(), "\n";
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(defrecord Fraction [numerator denominator])

This is a new Clojure feature, so there aren't any factory methods for creating an instance of the defrecord. If you're feeling verbose, you can do (defn make-fraction [numer denom] (Fraction. numer denom))

The fields can be accessed with keywords:

(:numerator instance-of-fraction)
(:denominator instance-of-fraction)

And toString is already implemented, so the normal print and println functions will work for it.

Setters are irrelevant as well, as they'd just be wrapping assoc:

(assoc instance-of-fraction :numerator 3) ; sets numerator to 3. Actually, returns a new instance of Fraction.
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In Scheme, using closure:

(define (fraction n d)
  (lambda (message . args)
    (case message
      ((numerator!) (set! n (car args)))
      ((denominator!) (set! d (car args)))
      ((numerator) n)
      ((denominator) d)
      ((print) (display n) (display "/") (display d)))))

Sample usage:

> (define f (fraction 10 3))
> (f 'numerator)
10
> (f 'denominator)
3
> (f 'numerator! 11)
> (f 'denominator! 2)
> (f 'print)
11/2
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In Ada (this could be improved I'm sure):

Specification:

package Fraction is

   type Fraction is private;
   procedure Print (This : Fraction);
   procedure Set_Numerator (This : in out Fraction;
                            A_Numerator : in Integer);
   procedure Set_Denominator (This : in out Fraction;
                              A_Denominator : in Integer);
   function Get_Numerator   (This : Fraction) return Integer;
   function Get_Denominator (This : Fraction) return Integer;

private
   type Fraction is tagged
      record 
         numerator : Integer;
         denominator : Integer;
      end record ;

end Fraction;

Body:

with Ada.Text_IO; use Ada.Text_IO;

package body Fraction is

   function Get_Numerator (This : Fraction) return Integer is
   begin
      return This.Numerator;
   end Get_Numerator;

   function Get_Denominator (This : Fraction) return Integer is
   begin
      return This.Denominator;
   end Get_Denominator;

   procedure Set_Numerator (This : in out Fraction;
                            A_Numerator : in Integer) is
   begin
      This.Numerator := A_Numerator;
   end Set_Numerator;

   procedure Set_Denominator (This : in out Fraction;
                              A_Denominator : in Integer) is
   begin
      This.Denominator := A_Denominator;
   end Set_Denominator;

   procedure Print (This : Fraction) is
   begin
      Put_Line (Integer'Image(This.Numerator));
      Put_Line (Integer'Image(This.Denominator));
   end Print;

end Fraction;

Usage:

with Fraction; use Fraction;

procedure Main
is
  f : Fraction.Fraction;
  n, d : Integer;
begin
  Set_Numerator (f, 2);
  Set_Denominator (f, 3);
  Print(f);
  n := Get_Numerator(f);
  d := Get_Denominator(f);
end Main;
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Scala

It can be as simple as this:

case class Fraction(var num: Int, var den: Int) {
  def print = println(num + "/" + den)
}

or, if you want setter and getter methods:

case class Fraction {
  private var _num: Int
  private var _den: Int

  def this(num: Int, den: Int) {
    _num = num
    _den = den
  }

  def num = _num
  def den = _den

  def num_=(num: Int) {
    _num = num
  }

  def den_=(den: Int) {
    _den = den
  }

  def print = println(_num + "/" + +den)
}

and some code to test it:

object FractionTester extends Application {
  val f = Fraction(2, 5)

  f.print

  val n = f.num
  val d = f.den
}

(note: I've only just typed this code in here, I haven't checked to see if it works properly or even compiles)

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C#

    public class Fraction
    {
        public int Numerator { get; set; }

        private int _denominator;
        public int Denominator
        {
            get
            {
                return _denominator;
            }
            set
            {
                if (value != 0)
                    _denominator = value;
                else
                    throw new ArgumentException("Denominator must be non-zero.");
            }
        }


        public Fraction(int numerator, int denominator)
        {
            Numerator = numerator;
            Denominator = denominator;
        }

        public override string ToString()
        {
            return string.Format("{0}/{1}", Numerator, Denominator);
        }

        public static implicit operator double(Fraction f)
        {
            return f.Numerator / f.Denominator;
        }
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1  
Denominator must be greater than zero, eh? Not a fan of negative numbers? ;) –  Dan Tao Apr 24 '10 at 5:01
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ABAP:

CLASS Fraction DEFINITION.
  PUBLIC SECTION.
    METHODS numerator IMPORTING i_numerator TYPE I.
    METHODS denominator IMPORTING i_denominator TYPE I.
    METHODS ToString RETURNING value(r_fraction) TYPE string.
    METHODS Print.
  PROTECTED SECTION.
    DATA: v_numerator TYPE   I,
          v_denominator TYPE I.
ENDCLASS. ""End Definition

CLASS Fraction IMPLEMENTATION.
  METHOD numerator.
    v_numerator = i_numerator.
  ENDMETHOD.

  METHOD denominator.
    v_denominator = i_denominator.
  ENDMETHOD.

  METHOD ToString.
    CONCATENATE v_numerator
                "/"
                v_denominator
           INTO r_fraction.
  ENDMETHOD.

  METHOD Print.
    DATA v_fraction.
    CONCATENATE v_numerator
                "/"
                v_denominator
           INTO v_fraction.
    WRITE: v_fraction, /.
  ENDMETHOD.

ENDCLASS. "End Implementation
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1  
Oh god... is this language real? –  Mark Apr 24 '10 at 5:31
2  
I did work experience at a large software company for a few weeks and coded in ABAP after knowing C#, Java, Python and (Some) Haskell. I nearly died. –  Callum Rogers Apr 26 '10 at 21:16
1  
One of the scariest moments of my life came when I was doing some C# coding at home one day and wrote an if statement in ABAP syntax without thinking. –  BenV Apr 26 '10 at 21:31
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I disagree with a mutable class for this. The following example still allows the numerator/denominator "setters" but returns a new Fraction object. The names are withNumerator and withDenominator to indicate this fact but they could easily be numerator or denominator (or even numerator=/denominator=, but that's just ... wrong):

case class Fraction(_numerator: Int, _denominator: Int) {
  def numerator = _numerator                            // getter
  def withNumerator(n: Int) = Fraction(n, _denominator) // returns NEW object
  def denominator = _denominator
  def withDenominator(n:Int) = Fraction(_numerator, n)
  override def toString = "" + numerator + "/" + denominator
  def print = println(this)
}

val f = Fraction(0,0).withNumerator(22).withDenominator(7)
f.print                // 22/7
val n = f.numerator
val d = f.denominator

Here is a version that just exposes the members directly so they are mutable:

case class Fraction(var numerator: Int, var denominator: Int) {
  override def toString = "" + numerator + "/" + denominator
  def print = println(this)
}

val f = Fraction(0,0)
f.numerator = 22  // direct member access
f.denominator = 7
f.print           // 22/7
val n = f.numerator
val d = f.denominator

Here is a version with plain "getters/setters" (just wrap the members and mutate the object):

case class Fraction(var _numerator: Int, var _denominator: Int) {
  def numerator = _numerator               // getter
  def numerator_=(n: Int) = _numerator = n // setter -- mutating
  def denominator = _denominator
  def denominator_=(n:Int) = _denominator = n
  override def toString = "" + numerator + "/" + denominator
  def print = println(this)
}

val f = Fraction(0,0)
f.numerator = 22   // setter -- mutating
f.denominator = 7
f.print            // 22/7
val n = f.numerator
val d = f.denominator
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AppleScript:

on makeFraction(n, d)
    script Fraction
        property numerator : n
        property denominator : d
        on asString()
            return (numerator as string) & "/" & denominator as string
        end asString
        on print {}
            display dialog asString()
        end print

        -- Just because we can
        on pronunciation()
            if denominator is 2 then
                if numerator is 1 then
                    return (numerator as string) & " half"
                else
                    return (numerator as string) & " halves"
                end if
            else if numerator is 1 then
                return asString() & "th"
            else
                return asString() & "ths"
            end if
        end pronunciation
        on say
            continue say pronunciation()
        end say
    end script
    return Fraction
end makeFraction

set f to makeFraction(0, 1)
set numerator of f to 2
set denominator of f to 5
tell f to print {}
tell f to say it -- "it" is meaningless here, but can be included for readability
set n to numerator of f
set d to denominator of f
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PowerShell:

function Fraction {
  new-object PSObject | select numerator, denominator | 
    add-member -passthru -membertype scriptmethod -name print -value { 
      write-host "$($this.numerator)/$($this.denominator)"
  }
}

$obj = Fraction
$obj.numerator = 3
$obj.denominator = 5
$obj.print()
$i = $obj.numerator
$d = $obj.denominator
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Fortran 2003 =)

Math.f90

MODULE Math

  IMPLICIT NONE

  PRIVATE

  PUBLIC :: Math_Fraction

  TYPE :: Math_Fraction
    PRIVATE
    INTEGER :: numerator_
    INTEGER :: denominator_
  CONTAINS
    PROCEDURE, PASS :: set_numerator
    PROCEDURE, PASS :: set_denominator
    PROCEDURE, PASS :: numerator
    PROCEDURE, PASS :: denominator
    PROCEDURE, PASS :: print
  END TYPE Math_Fraction

  CONTAINS

    SUBROUTINE set_numerator(this, numerator)
      CLASS(Math_Fraction) :: this
      INTEGER, INTENT(IN) :: numerator

      this%numerator_ = numerator
    END SUBROUTINE set_numerator

    SUBROUTINE set_denominator(this, denominator)
      CLASS(Math_Fraction) :: this
      INTEGER, INTENT(IN) :: denominator

      this%denominator_ = denominator
    END SUBROUTINE set_denominator

    FUNCTION numerator(this) RESULT(result)
      CLASS(Math_Fraction) :: this
      INTEGER :: result

      result = this%numerator_
    END FUNCTION numerator

    FUNCTION denominator(this) RESULT(result)
      CLASS(Math_Fraction) :: this
      INTEGER :: result

      result = this%denominator_
    END FUNCTION denominator


    SUBROUTINE print(this)
      CLASS(Math_Fraction) :: this

      WRITE (*, *) this%numerator_, '/', this%denominator_
    END SUBROUTINE print

END MODULE Math

Main.f90

PROGRAM Main

  USE Math

  IMPLICIT NONE

  TYPE(Math_Fraction) :: f

  CALL f%set_numerator(2)
  CALL f%set_denominator(5)

  WRITE (*, *) f%numerator(), '/', f%denominator()

  CALL f%print

END PROGRAM Main

Compile using gfortran 4.5:

$ gfortran -o app Math.f90 Main.f90
$ ./app
           2 /           5
           2 /           5
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This is how it would look in idiomatic Scala:

case class Fraction(numerator: Int, denominator: Int) {
  override def toString = numerator + "/" + denominator
}

object FractionInAction {
  def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = {
    val f = Fraction(2, 5) 
    val n = f.numerator
    val d = f.denominator
    println(f)  // prints "2/5"

    // Getting modified copy
    val f1 = f copy (numerator = f.numerator + 1)
    println(f1) // prints "3/5"
  }
}

PS: I am aware that my Fraction class is immutable and thus doesn't follow the specification. See @Zoltan's answer for non-idiomatic but in-accordance-with-spec Scala solution.

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