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from threading import Timer

def hello():
    print "hello, world"

t = Timer(30.0, hello)
t.start()

This code only fires the timer once.

How can I make the timer run forever?

Thanks,

updated

this is right :

import time,sys

def hello():
    while True:
        print "Hello, Word!"
        sys.stdout.flush()
        time.sleep(2.0)
hello()

and this:

from threading import Timer

def hello():
    print "hello, world"
    sys.stdout.flush()
    t = Timer(2.0, hello)
    t.start()

t = Timer(2.0, hello)
t.start()
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A threading.Timer executes a function once. That function can "run forever" if you wish, for example:

import time

def hello():
    while True:
        print "Hello, Word!"
        time.sleep(30.0)

Using multiple Timer instances would consume substantial resources with no real added value. If you want to be non-invasive to the function you're repeating every 30 seconds, a simple way would be:

import time

def makerepeater(delay, fun, *a, **k):
    def wrapper(*a, **k):
        while True:
            fun(*a, **k)
            time.sleep(delay)
    return wrapper

and then schedule makerepeater(30, hello) instead of hello.

For more sophisticated operations, I recommend standard library module sched.

share|improve this answer
    
but i can't see print anything –  zjm1126 Apr 24 '10 at 2:42
    
hi alex, and did you know how to make this in a therad ..thanks –  zjm1126 Apr 24 '10 at 3:30
    
print from a thread (assuming that's what you mean by "therad") may not be a great idea -- the logging module is guaranteed to be thread-safe, print isn't. Anyway, if you schedule the result of makerepeater with Timer, it will of course (try to) run in its own thread. –  Alex Martelli Apr 24 '10 at 4:42

Just restart (or recreate) the timer within the function:

#!/usr/bin/python
from threading import Timer

def hello():
    print "hello, world"
    t = Timer(2.0, hello)
    t.start()

t = Timer(2.0, hello)
t.start()
share|improve this answer
    
Why, the downvote? This works fine, as per the spec. –  paxdiablo Apr 24 '10 at 2:05
    
I know, right? It seems every answer to this question was downvoted without any explanation. –  zneak Apr 24 '10 at 2:06
    
Author or someone else seems to be trolling :/ –  user202459 Apr 24 '10 at 2:08
    
this does not work for me: raise RuntimeError("thread already started") –  zoidbergi Nov 28 '13 at 16:06
1  
@zoodbergi, not sure what you're doing wrong, that works fine in 2.7.3 and 3.2.3 (once parentheses are added to the print). No exceptions are raised. –  paxdiablo Jan 14 at 5:28

from threading import Timer it depends on which part you want to run for ever, if it's creating a new thread let's say every 10 seconds you can do the following from threading import Timer

import time
def hello():
    print "hello, world"

while True: #Runs the code forever over and over again, called a loop
    time.sleep(10)#Make it sleep 10 seconds, as to not create too many threads
    t = Timer(30.0, hello)
    t.start()

if it's the hello world you want to run forever you can do the following:

from threading import Timer

def hello():
    while True: # Runs this part forever
        print "hello, world"

t = Timer(30.0, hello)
t.start()

Search up loops in python to get more info on this

share|improve this answer
    
i can't see anything. –  zjm1126 Apr 24 '10 at 2:44

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