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How do I bypass invalid SSL certificate errors with Apache HttpClient 4.0?

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5  
It should be noted that the answers to this question don't do more than what's asked: they let you ignore the error but don't fix the underlying problem (a bit like removing the batteries from a smoke alarm instead of putting out the fire). Certificates have a purpose in ensuring the security of the SSL/TLS connection, ignoring those errors introduces a vulnerability to MITM attack. Use test certificates instead of ignoring the error. –  Bruno May 13 '12 at 22:42
1  
Related to stackoverflow.com/questions/1828775/… –  Gray May 17 '12 at 17:14
6  
"like removing the batteries from a smoke alarm" You might give other developers the benefit of the doubt and assume they know what they're doing. Perhaps the motivation for this question is local testing and the OP wishes to run a quick test without going through the horrible amounts of Java boilerplate necessary to set up even a simple SSL environment. Maybe someone could just answer the question without going into a "holier than thou" lecture. –  Mike Jan 16 at 18:42

14 Answers 14

up vote 40 down vote accepted

You need to create a SSLContext with your own TrustManager and create HTTPS scheme using this context. Here is the code,

SSLContext sslContext = SSLContext.getInstance("SSL");

// set up a TrustManager that trusts everything
sslContext.init(null, new TrustManager[] { new X509TrustManager() {
            public X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() {
                    System.out.println("getAcceptedIssuers =============");
                    return null;
            }

            public void checkClientTrusted(X509Certificate[] certs,
                            String authType) {
                    System.out.println("checkClientTrusted =============");
            }

            public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] certs,
                            String authType) {
                    System.out.println("checkServerTrusted =============");
            }
} }, new SecureRandom());

SSLSocketFactory sf = new SSLSocketFactory(sslContext);
Scheme httpsScheme = new Scheme("https", 443, sf);
SchemeRegistry schemeRegistry = new SchemeRegistry();
schemeRegistry.register(httpsScheme);

// apache HttpClient version >4.2 should use BasicClientConnectionManager
ClientConnectionManager cm = new SingleClientConnManager(schemeRegistry);
HttpClient httpClient = new DefaultHttpClient(cm);
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1  
Say I don't want to buy valid SSL certificate for my site and just want to use it, this piece of code can help? How come I don't see any part where a URL is needed or exception handling is needed? –  Viet Apr 24 '10 at 10:56
1  
As you can see the X509TrustManager doesn't check for anything and doesn't throw any exceptions so any cert is accepted. –  ZZ Coder Apr 24 '10 at 13:19
1  
Just use anonymous DH ciphersuites and be done with it. –  GregS Apr 24 '10 at 13:22
11  
Hmm, it's telling me that 'new SSLSocketFactory(ssslCont)' is expecting a KeyStore, not an SSLContext. Am I missing something? –  billynomates Apr 5 '12 at 15:20
2  
I get the error that an X509TrustManager can't be cast to a TrustManager. –  MW. Jan 16 '13 at 19:36

Just for the record, there is a much simpler way to accomplish the same with HttpClient 4.1

    SSLSocketFactory sslsf = new SSLSocketFactory(new TrustStrategy() {

        public boolean isTrusted(
                final X509Certificate[] chain, String authType) throws CertificateException {
            // Oh, I am easy...
            return true;
        }

    });
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Are you missing some code in this sample? Maybe a call to httpClient.set...? –  Gray May 17 '12 at 17:08
5  
httpclient.getConnectionManager().getSchemeRegistry().register(new Scheme("https", 443, sslsf)); –  Ben Flynn Apr 6 '13 at 5:55
1  
SSLSocketFactory is deprecated in HttpClient 4.3 –  Toilal Jan 8 at 7:10

All of the other answers were either deprecated or didn't work for HttpClient 4.3.

Here is a way to allow all hostnames when building an http client.

CloseableHttpClient httpClient = HttpClients.custom().setHostnameVerifier(new AllowAllHostnameVerifier()).build();
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Thanks for the answer, I would like to know from which package is HttpsClients as I'm using in Android compile("org.apache.httpcomponents:httpclient:4.3.4") but this class doesn't appear. –  juancho Nov 15 at 15:27
    
It's package is org.apache.http.impl.client.HttpClients . –  erversteeg Nov 17 at 15:11

This is how I did it -

  1. Create my own MockSSLSocketFactory (Class attached below)
  2. Use it to initialise DefaultHttpClient. Proxy settings need to be provided if a proxy is used.

Initialising DefaultHTTPClient -

SchemeRegistry schemeRegistry = new SchemeRegistry();
    schemeRegistry.register(new Scheme("http", 80, PlainSocketFactory.getSocketFactory()));
    schemeRegistry.register(new Scheme("https", 443, new MockSSLSocketFactory()));
    ClientConnectionManager cm = new SingleClientConnManager(schemeRegistry);

    DefaultHttpClient httpclient = new DefaultHttpClient(cm);

Mock SSL Factory -

public class MockSSLSocketFactory extends SSLSocketFactory {

public MockSSLSocketFactory() throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, KeyManagementException, KeyStoreException, UnrecoverableKeyException {
    super(trustStrategy, hostnameVerifier);
}

private static final X509HostnameVerifier hostnameVerifier = new X509HostnameVerifier() {
    @Override
    public void verify(String host, SSLSocket ssl) throws IOException {
        // Do nothing
    }

    @Override
    public void verify(String host, X509Certificate cert) throws SSLException {
        //Do nothing
    }

    @Override
    public void verify(String host, String[] cns, String[] subjectAlts) throws SSLException {
        //Do nothing
    }

    @Override
    public boolean verify(String s, SSLSession sslSession) {
        return true; 
    }
};

private static final TrustStrategy trustStrategy = new TrustStrategy() {
    @Override
    public boolean isTrusted(X509Certificate[] chain, String authType) throws CertificateException {
        return true;
    }
};
}

If behind a proxy, need to do this -

HttpParams params = new BasicHttpParams();
    params.setParameter(AuthPNames.PROXY_AUTH_PREF, getClientAuthPrefs());

DefaultHttpClient httpclient = new DefaultHttpClient(cm, params);

httpclient.getCredentialsProvider().setCredentials(
                        new AuthScope(proxyHost, proxyPort),
                        new UsernamePasswordCredentials(proxyUser, proxyPass));
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Wow! That's rather detailed. Thanks! –  Viet Aug 17 '12 at 3:33
    
It would help if you included the imports in the future. There are two different classes. –  AndroidDev Dec 6 '12 at 17:16

If all you want to do is get rid of invalid hostname errors you can just do:

HttpClient httpClient = new DefaultHttpClient();
SSLSocketFactory sf = (SSLSocketFactory)httpClient.getConnectionManager()
    .getSchemeRegistry().getScheme("https").getSocketFactory();
sf.setHostnameVerifier(new AllowAllHostnameVerifier());
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7  
The sf.setHostnameVerifier method has been deprecated as of 4.1. The alternative is to use one of the constructors. For example: SSLSocketFactory sf = new SSLSocketFactory(sslContext, SSLSocketFactory.ALLOW_ALL_HOSTNAME_VERIFIER); –  kaliatech Jun 1 '11 at 21:04
        DefaultHttpClient httpclient = new DefaultHttpClient();

    SSLContext sslContext;
    try {
        sslContext = SSLContext.getInstance("SSL");

        // set up a TrustManager that trusts everything
        try {
            sslContext.init(null,
                    new TrustManager[] { new X509TrustManager() {
                        public X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() {
                            log.debug("getAcceptedIssuers =============");
                            return null;
                        }

                        public void checkClientTrusted(
                                X509Certificate[] certs, String authType) {
                            log.debug("checkClientTrusted =============");
                        }

                        public void checkServerTrusted(
                                X509Certificate[] certs, String authType) {
                            log.debug("checkServerTrusted =============");
                        }
                    } }, new SecureRandom());
        } catch (KeyManagementException e) {
        }
         SSLSocketFactory ssf = new SSLSocketFactory(sslContext,SSLSocketFactory.ALLOW_ALL_HOSTNAME_VERIFIER);
         ClientConnectionManager ccm = this.httpclient.getConnectionManager();
         SchemeRegistry sr = ccm.getSchemeRegistry();
         sr.register(new Scheme("https", 443, ssf));            
    } catch (Exception e) {
        log.error(e.getMessage(),e);
    }
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In extension to ZZ Coder's answer it will be nice to override the hostnameverifier.

// ...
SSLSocketFactory sf = new SSLSocketFactory (sslContext);
sf.setHostnameVerifier(new X509HostnameVerifier() {
    public boolean verify(String hostname, SSLSession session) {
        return true;
    }

    public void verify(String host, String[] cns, String[] subjectAlts) throws SSLException {
    }

    public void verify(String host, X509Certificate cert) throws SSLException {
    }

    public void verify(String host, SSLSocket ssl) throws IOException {
    }
});
// ...
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You can achieve the same by just doing sf.setHostnameVerifier(new AllowAllHostnameVerifier()); –  Dan Dyer May 5 '11 at 19:57
7  
The sf.setHostnameVerifier has been deprecated as of 4.1. The alternative is to use one of the constructors. For example: SSLSocketFactory sf = new SSLSocketFactory(sslContext, SSLSocketFactory.ALLOW_ALL_HOSTNAME_VERIFIER); –  kaliatech Jun 1 '11 at 21:03

Tested with 4.3.3

import java.security.KeyManagementException;
import java.security.KeyStoreException;
import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException;
import java.security.SecureRandom;
import java.security.cert.CertificateException;
import java.security.cert.X509Certificate;

import javax.net.ssl.SSLContext;

import org.apache.http.Header;
import org.apache.http.HttpEntity;
import org.apache.http.client.methods.CloseableHttpResponse;
import org.apache.http.client.methods.HttpGet;
import org.apache.http.conn.ssl.SSLConnectionSocketFactory;
import org.apache.http.conn.ssl.SSLContexts;
import org.apache.http.conn.ssl.TrustStrategy;
import org.apache.http.impl.client.CloseableHttpClient;
import org.apache.http.impl.client.HttpClients;
import org.apache.http.util.EntityUtils;

public class AccessProtectedResource {

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

    // Trust all certs
    SSLContext sslcontext = buildSSLContext();

    // Allow TLSv1 protocol only
    SSLConnectionSocketFactory sslsf = new SSLConnectionSocketFactory(
            sslcontext,
            new String[] { "TLSv1" },
            null,
            SSLConnectionSocketFactory.ALLOW_ALL_HOSTNAME_VERIFIER);

    CloseableHttpClient httpclient = HttpClients.custom()
            .setSSLSocketFactory(sslsf)
            .build();
    try {

        HttpGet httpget = new HttpGet("https://yoururl");

        System.out.println("executing request" + httpget.getRequestLine());

        CloseableHttpResponse response = httpclient.execute(httpget);
        try {
            HttpEntity entity = response.getEntity();

            System.out.println("----------------------------------------");
            System.out.println(response.getStatusLine());
            if (entity != null) {
                System.out.println("Response content length: " + entity.getContentLength());
            }
            for (Header header : response.getAllHeaders()) {
                System.out.println(header);
            }
            EntityUtils.consume(entity);
        } finally {
            response.close();
        }
    } finally {
        httpclient.close();
    }
}

private static SSLContext buildSSLContext()
        throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, KeyManagementException,
        KeyStoreException {
    SSLContext sslcontext = SSLContexts.custom()
            .setSecureRandom(new SecureRandom())
            .loadTrustMaterial(null, new TrustStrategy() {

                public boolean isTrusted(X509Certificate[] chain, String authType)
                        throws CertificateException {
                    return true;
                }
            })
            .build();
    return sslcontext;
}

}

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The answer posted on this comment helped me!

http://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=1946#c10

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a full working version for Apache HttpClient 4.1.3 (based on oleg's code above, but it still needed an allow_all_hostname_verifier on my system):

private static HttpClient trustEveryoneSslHttpClient() {
    try {
        SchemeRegistry registry = new SchemeRegistry();

        SSLSocketFactory socketFactory = new SSLSocketFactory(new TrustStrategy() {

            public boolean isTrusted(final X509Certificate[] chain, String authType) throws CertificateException {
                // Oh, I am easy...
                return true;
            }

        }, org.apache.http.conn.ssl.SSLSocketFactory.ALLOW_ALL_HOSTNAME_VERIFIER);

        registry.register(new Scheme("https", 443, socketFactory));
        ThreadSafeClientConnManager mgr = new ThreadSafeClientConnManager(registry);
        DefaultHttpClient client = new DefaultHttpClient(mgr, new DefaultHttpClient().getParams());
        return client;
    } catch (GeneralSecurityException e) {
        throw new RuntimeException(e);
    }
}

Note I'm re-throwing all exceptions because really, there's not much I can do if any of this fails in a real system!

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If you are using the fluent API, you need to set it up via the Executor:

Executor.unregisterScheme("https");
SSLSocketFactory sslSocketFactory = new SSLSocketFactory(sslContext,
                                  SSLSocketFactory.ALLOW_ALL_HOSTNAME_VERIFIER);
Executor.registerScheme(new Scheme("https", 443, sslSocketFactory));

... where sslContext is the SSLContext created as shown in the ZZ Coder's answer.

After that, you can do your http requests as:

String responseAsString = Request.Get("https://192.168.1.0/whatever.json")
                         .execute().getContent().asString();

Note: tested with HttpClient 4.2

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Unfortunately deprecated in 4.3: "Deprecated. (4.3) do not use." –  STM Aug 5 at 21:19

An example in Scala

ZZ Coder's answer gives most of what you need, but I still had to figure out the rest of the pieces. Here's a more complete example in three separate files. Remember that the intention is to suppress the error (and not to actually fix the certificate problem). Sometimes this is what you need to get past the error and build your application's logic. I hope this provides a little more context to pair with other answers on this topic.

In com/example/trustissues/TrustEverythingX509HostnameVerifier.scala:

package com.example.trustissues

import java.security.cert.X509Certificate
import javax.net.ssl.{SSLSocket, SSLSession}
import org.apache.http.conn.ssl.X509HostnameVerifier

/** Implementation of X509HostnameVerifier for use with HTTPS requests.
  * Used to explicitly accept unsigned X509 certificates.
  */
class TrustEverythingX509HostnameVerifier extends X509HostnameVerifier {
    /** Do nothing. */
    def verify(host: String, ssl_socket: SSLSocket): Unit = {}

    /** Do nothing. */
    def verify(host: String, common_names: Array[String], subject_alternative_names: Array[String]): Unit = {}

    /** Do nothing. */
    def verify(host: String, cert: X509Certificate): Unit = {}

    /** Always return true. */
    def verify(host: String, ssl_session: SSLSession): Boolean = {true}
}

In com/example/trustissues/TrustEverythingX509TrustManager.scala:

package com.example.trustissues

import java.security.cert.X509Certificate
import javax.net.ssl.X509TrustManager

/** Implementation of X509TrustManager for use with HTTPS requests.
  * Used to explicitly accept unsigned X509 certificates.
  */
class TrustEverythingX509TrustManager extends X509TrustManager {
    /** Return null. */
    def getAcceptedIssuers: Array[X509Certificate] = {null}

    /** Do nothing. */
    def checkClientTrusted(certificates: Array[X509Certificate], auth_type: String): Unit = {}

    /** Do nothing. */
    def checkServerTrusted(certificates: Array[X509Certificate], auth_type: String): Unit = {}
}

And a usage example:

...
import javax.net.ssl.{SSLContext, TrustManager}
import java.security.SecureRandom
import org.apache.http.conn.ssl.SSLSocketFactory
import org.apache.http.conn.scheme.{Scheme, SchemeRegistry}
import org.apache.http.conn.ClientConnectionManager
import org.apache.http.params.{HttpParams, BasicHttpParams}
import org.apache.http.impl.conn.SingleClientConnManager
import org.apache.http.client.HttpClient

import com.example.trustissues.{TrustEverythingX509HostnameVerifier, TrustEverythingX509TrustManager}
...

...
// Force SSL to trust all certificates as per
// http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2703161/how-to-ignore-ssl-certificate-errors-in-apache-httpclient-4-0
// -- and --
// http://javaskeleton.blogspot.com/2010/07/avoiding-peer-not-authenticated-with.html.
val ssl_context: SSLContext = SSLContext.getInstance("SSL")
ssl_context.init(null, Array[TrustManager](new TrustEverythingX509TrustManager), new SecureRandom)
val socket_factory: SSLSocketFactory = new SSLSocketFactory(ssl_context)
socket_factory.setHostnameVerifier(new TrustEverythingX509HostnameVerifier)
val scheme_registry: SchemeRegistry = new SchemeRegistry
scheme_registry.register(new Scheme("https", socket_factory, 443))
val http_params: HttpParams = new BasicHttpParams
val connection_manager: ClientConnectionManager = new SingleClientConnManager(http_params, scheme_registry)

// Execute request.
var instream: InputStream = new DefaultHttpClient(connection_manager, http_params).execute(new HttpGet(url)).getEntity.getContent
var response_body: String = ""
var read_byte: Int = instream.read
while (read_byte != -1) {
    response_body += read_byte.asInstanceOf[Char]
    read_byte = instream.read
}
println(response_body)
...
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1  
That's merely converting the existing Java code into Scala, and the question isn't about Scala. Note that these answers don't fix the problem, they just ignore the error (and leave the connection potentially vulnerable to MITM attacks). –  Bruno Apr 4 '12 at 1:26
    
There is value in the completeness of this answer. –  countfloortiles Apr 30 '12 at 14:01

If you encountered this problem when using AmazonS3Client, which embeds Apache HttpClient 4.1, you simply need to define a system property like this so that the SSL cert checker is relaxed:

-Dcom.amazonaws.sdk.disableCertChecking=true

Mischief managed

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For the record, tested with httpclient 4.3.6 and compatible with Executor of fluent api:

CloseableHttpClient httpClient = HttpClients.custom().
                    setHostnameVerifier(new AllowAllHostnameVerifier()).
                    setSslcontext(new SSLContextBuilder().loadTrustMaterial(null, new TrustStrategy()
                    {
                        public boolean isTrusted(X509Certificate[] arg0, String arg1) throws CertificateException
                        {
                            return true;
                        }
                    }).build()).build();
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