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I'm writing an AJAX web app that uses Comet/Long Polling to keep the web page up to date, and I noticed in Chrome, it treats the page as if it's always loading (icon for the tab keeps spinning).

I thought this was normal for Google Chrome + Ajax because even Google Wave had this behaviour.

Well today I noticed that Google Wave no longer keeps the loading icon spinning, anyone know how they fixed this?

Here's my ajax call code

var xmlHttpReq = false;
// Mozilla/Safari
if (window.XMLHttpRequest) {
   xmlHttpReq = new XMLHttpRequest();
}
// IE
else if (window.ActiveXObject) {
   xmlHttpReq = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
}
xmlHttpReq.open('GET', myURL, true);
xmlHttpReq.setRequestHeader('Content-Type', 'application/x-www-form-urlencoded');
xmlHttpReq.onreadystatechange = function() {
   if (xmlHttpReq.readyState == 4) {
      updatePage(xmlHttpReq.responseText);
   }
}
xmlHttpReq.send(null);
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 29 down vote accepted

I shamelessly stole Oleg's test case and adjusted it a bit to simulate long-polling.

load.html:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<head>
  <title>Demonstration of the jQery.load problem</title>
  <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.js"></script>
  <script>
  jQuery(document).ready(function() {
    $('#main').load("test.php");
  });
  </script>
</head>
<body>
  <div id='main'></div>
</body>
</html>

test.php:

<?php
  sleep(5);
?>
<b>OK!</b>

The result is interesting: in Firefox and Opera, no loading indicator is shown during XMLHTTPRequests. Chrome lets it spinning... I suspect Google Wave doesn't use long polling anymore (but, for instance, polls every X seconds, to save resources), but I can't test it, as I don't have an account.

EDIT: And I figured it out: after adding a little delay in loading test.php, which can be as small as possible, the loading indicator stops after load.html has been loaded:

jQuery(document).ready(function() {
  setTimeout(function () {
    $('#main').load("test.php");
  }, 0);
});

Somehow, as is confirmed in a comment on another answer, when the browser gets control back to finish page rendering, the indicator stops spinning. Another advantage is that the request cannot be aborted by pressing Esc.

share|improve this answer
    
But wouldn't polling every x seconds increase the load on the server? I guess it can go other way now that I think about it (Long Polling vs Poling every x seconds). But I'm not sure I'm convinced they switched from Long Polling. –  Martin Konecny Apr 26 '10 at 13:03
    
@teehoo: I once read that long polling is heavy on resources, as many connections have to be kept open at the same time, something HTTP is not designed for. But I'm no expert in servers, so please correct me if I'm wrong. –  Marcel Korpel Apr 26 '10 at 14:41
    
I guess keeping connections open takes more memory, but opening and closing connections constantly takes more CPU + bandwidth? Thanks for looking into this, I'll verify it works when I get home. –  Martin Konecny Apr 26 '10 at 18:33
    
Thanks works perfectly, It looks like this lets Chrome finish loading everything first, which allows the spinner to stop, and then its not allowed to start up again on an AJAX call. –  Martin Konecny Apr 28 '10 at 16:05
    
"setTimeout" helps, thanks! –  Tim Büthe Feb 1 '11 at 16:22

Sorry for my general answer, but if you want to have a program which are more browser independent you should use jQuery or other your favorite library instead of low level XMLHttpRequest and ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP").

EDITED: I create two very simple HTML files: test.htm and load.htm and placed there in the same directory on a web site (try this one URL http://www.ok-soft-gmbh.com/jQuery/load/load.htm). I can't see effect which you describes in you question. Compare this files with your examples and you will solve your problem.

load.htm:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC
          "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
          "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head id="Head">
  <title>Demonstration of the jQery.load problem</title>
  <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
  <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.js"></script>
  <script type="text/javascript">
  jQuery(document).ready(function() {
    $('#main').load("test.htm");
  });
  </script>
</head>

<body>
  <div id='main'></div>
</body>
</html>

test.htm:

<b>OK!</b>
share|improve this answer
    
I don't know who downvoted you, I'll put this back up to zero because I found it somewhat helpful. Ill try JQuery and report back. –  Martin Konecny Apr 24 '10 at 9:25
    
try usage one line of code instead of you code fragment: $('#elementtoupdate').load(myURL); You can add also some fadeIn effects or other one. –  Oleg Apr 24 '10 at 9:35
    
So I implemented JQuery, and it made my code a little cleaner, but I still get the constantly loading status. –  Martin Konecny Apr 24 '10 at 14:09
    
The difference between my script and yours is that as soon the ajax loading finishes, I automatically restart a Comet Poll. Comet Polling is when the browser can wait up to a minute before the server responds. During this time the loader is still spinning. But only in Chrome, Firefox (correctly) looks as if its doing nothing. –  Martin Konecny Apr 24 '10 at 20:13
    
If you have the same effect with both your old code and with the code used jQuery, then the problem exist in another place: HOW you use Comet Polling. And the solution of your problem one should search here. And the code fragment which you posted probably has no errors at all. Are you agree? –  Oleg Apr 24 '10 at 21:38

use this function

function getHTTPObject() {
 var xhr = false;
 if (window.XMLHttpRequest) {
  xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
 } else if (window.ActiveXObject) {
  try {
   xhr = new ActiveXObject("Msxml2.XMLHTTP");
  } catch(e) {
   try {
    xhr = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
   } catch(e) {
    xhr = false;
   };
  };
 };
 return xhr;
};
share|improve this answer
3  
Can you format better ? –  Romain Hippeau Apr 24 '10 at 17:51

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