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I'm familiar with printing time difference in milliseconds:

 long time = System.currentTimeMillis();
 //do something that takes some time...
 long completedIn = System.currentTimeMillis() - time;

But, is there a nice way print a complete time in a specified format (eg: HH:MM:SS) either using Apache Commons or even the dreaded platform API's Date/Time objects? In other words, what is the shortest, simplest, no nonsense way to write a time format derived from milliseconds in Java?

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3  
Should be System.currentTimeMillis() - time;. –  Péter Török Apr 24 '10 at 12:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Apache Commons has the DurationFormatUtils class for applying a specified format to a time duration. So, something like:

long time = System.currentTimeMillis();
//do something that takes some time...
long completedIn = System.currentTimeMillis() - time;

DurationFormatUtils.formatDuration(completedIn, "HH:mm:ss:SS");
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You could even inline that to: DurationFormatUtils.formatDuration(System.currentTimeMillis() - time, "HH:mm:ss:SS"); –  Liggy Apr 24 '10 at 12:58
5  
Or use the almost identical, built-in DurationFormatUtils.formatDurationHMS(end-start); –  JRL Apr 24 '10 at 13:03
    
@JRL: DurationFormatUtils.formatDurationHMS(end-start); will satisfy the example given in the question, but I added the milliseconds in my solution. –  Bill the Lizard Apr 24 '10 at 13:11
1  
yep! Although formatDurationHMS doesn't quite fit the requirements as it's H:m:s and not HH:mm:ss, but I just wanted to point it out as a possibility. –  JRL Apr 24 '10 at 13:33
long diff = System.currentTimeMillis() - startTime;
int hours = (int)(diff / 3600000); diff -= hours * 3600000;
int mins = (int)(diff / 60000); diff -= mins * 60000;
int secs = (int)(diff / 1000); diff -= secs * 1000;
System.out.println(String.format("%d:%d:%d.%d", hours, mins, secs, diff));
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This output format is broken. –  Salvador Valencia Nov 7 '13 at 18:39

A library designed for the purpose is the better approach, but SimpleDateFormat with the right TimeZone may suffice for periods less than a day. Longer periods require treating the day specially.

import java.text.DateFormat;
import java.util.Date;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.TimeZone;

public class Elapsed {

    private static final long MS_DAY = 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000;
    private final DateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("HH : mm : ss : S");

    public Elapsed() {
        df.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT"));
    }

    private String format(long elapsed) {
        long day = elapsed / MS_DAY;
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        sb.append(day);
        sb.append(" : ");
        sb.append(df.format(new Date(elapsed)));
        return sb.toString();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Elapsed e = new Elapsed();
        for (long t = 0; t < 3 * MS_DAY; t += MS_DAY / 2) {
            System.out.println(e.format(t));
        }
    }
}

Console output:

0 : 00 : 00 : 00 : 0
0 : 12 : 00 : 00 : 0
1 : 00 : 00 : 00 : 0
1 : 12 : 00 : 00 : 0
2 : 00 : 00 : 00 : 0
2 : 12 : 00 : 00 : 0
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Not to my knowledge. But printf() can do this easily if you calculate the values for H, M and S, and use a %02 pattern for each.

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If you actually want to see a millisecond difference, I don't think there's a shorter, simpler way.

If you need a more powerful (but certainly not simpler) way to collect performance statistics, there is Perf4J.

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