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Usually when looking for some items not showing up in the other table, we can use:

select * from gifts where giftID not in (select giftID from sentgifts);

or

select * from gifts where giftID not in (select distinct giftID from sentgifts);

the second line is with "distinct" added, so that the resulting table is smaller, and probably let the search for "not in" faster too.

So, won't using "distinct" be desirable? Often than not, I don't see it being used in the subquery in such a case. Is there advantage or disadvantage of using it? thanks.

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1  
"probably" - have you checked? Have you compared execution plans? –  AakashM Apr 24 '10 at 14:56
    
what is an execution plan? is it something that can show how fast a query will run? –  動靜能量 Apr 24 '10 at 15:09
    
An execution plan is a report from the DBMS showing how the query is resolved and what indexes, sorting methods, filtering, grouping etc are used. Sometimes you can look at two different execution plans and see exactly why one is faster, but often you just use it to see that the expected indexes are being used and that you are not doing anything stupid. –  MJB Apr 24 '10 at 16:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you call DISTINCT on a result, it required a scan through the list in order to find and remove the duplicated. This is a slow operation, and there is a good chance that the query as a whole will be faster without it.

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So, won't using "distinct" be desirable? Often than not, I don't see it being used in the subquery in such a case. Is there advantage or disadvantage of using it?

The result of these queries will always be the same.

MySQL's optimizer is well aware of that and will use the same plan for both queries.

If sentgifts.giftID is indexed, the query will be optimized to use the index_subquery access path: it will search the index and return TRUE on index miss or FALSE on first index hit.

This will be same whether you use DISTINCT or not.

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select * from gifts where not exists 
(select giftID from sentgifts where sentgifts.giftID = gifts.giftID);

I think, you can write the same query in the above style as well.
Its just that, you will have to find which one works better for you (in terms of performance or other criteria).

EDIT: Here is the page which says, it is better to use NOT IN or LEFT JOIN.

Hope that helps.
Note: I don't have any experience on mysql

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