Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I meet one problem that i can't solve now. I have the following:

UnityHelper.DefaultContainer.RegisterInstance(typeof(IMyInterface), "test", instance);

where UnityHelper.DefaultContainer is my helper for getting unity container with loaded configuration.

here I registered instance as an instance of IMyInterface.

So anywhere(some time after using) I want to remove this mapping. Remove it at all. How I can do it?

I have tried

UnityHelper.DefaultContainer.Teardown(instance)

but is was unsuccessfull and the following code returns instance anyway.

UnityHelper.DefaultContainer.ResolveAll()

Any ideas?
Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Interesting. Why do you need this by the way? –  Yauheni Sivukha Apr 24 '10 at 17:25
    
I use mocked instances in tests and want to clear environment for next test. Currently instances from previous test is in container and appear when I call ResolveAll<IMyInterface>(). –  bug0r Apr 24 '10 at 17:38
    
In the commmon scenario developer can change implementation on the fly. –  bug0r Apr 24 '10 at 17:39
1  
Usually I create separate container for each test. This avoids such problems... Regarding changing on the fly - This will cause trouble with concurency - be carefull. I think that implementation can be changen by registering another instance whith the same name (but i not sure). –  Yauheni Sivukha Apr 24 '10 at 18:28
    
yes about registering, but it will not remove it from "list of all" it is possible to create a special empty implementation to emulate delete, but I don't like this way. Creating separate container is good but container is created in code I want to test. –  bug0r Apr 24 '10 at 20:17

5 Answers 5

I had the same problem and just removed the registrations of the ContainerControlledLifetimeManager from my Container

foreach (var registration in container.Registrations.Where(p => p.RegisteredType == typeof(object) && p.LifetimeManagerType == typeof(ContainerControlledLifetimeManager)))
            {
                registration.LifetimeManager.RemoveValue();
            }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, just what I was looking for! –  Golvellius Nov 6 '13 at 10:15

I think that is what you are looking for.

var lifetimeManager = new TransientLifetimeManager();
UnityHelper.DefaultContainer.RegisterInstance(typeof(IMyInterface), "test", instance, lifetimeManager);
lifetimeManager.RemoveValue();
share|improve this answer
    
will try this way –  bug0r Apr 24 '10 at 20:28
    
so, did it work? –  er-v Apr 27 '10 at 15:01
    
No. it is not. Exception raises when second time resolving run. –  bug0r Apr 27 '10 at 15:41
    
yes, it should. Something about that interface can not be constructed. That is becouse lifetimeManager.RemoveValue() - removes registration from Unity. The same exception come if you don't register type at all. I thought than this what you wanted. Isn't it? –  er-v Apr 27 '10 at 15:49
    
Resolution of the dependency failed, type = "IMyInterface", name = "test". Exception message is: The current build operation (build key Build Key[IMyInterface, test]) failed: The current type, IMyInterface, is an interface and cannot be constructed. Are you missing a type mapping? (Strategy type BuildPlanStrategy, index 3) when resolving –  bug0r Apr 27 '10 at 15:50

Here is how I handled unregistering instances from a unity container

I needed to implement Add/Remove functionality like this:

public interface IObjectBuilder
{
    void AddInstance<T>(T instance);
    void RemoveInstance<T>(T instance);
}

I created a custom lifetime manager to do the implementation

public class ExplicitLifetimeManager :
    LifetimeManager
{
    object Value;

    public override object GetValue()
    {
        return Value;
    }

    public override void SetValue(object newValue)
    {
        Value = newValue;
    }

    public override void RemoveValue()
    {
        Value = null;
    }
}

Here is the final implementation:

    Dictionary<object, ExplicitLifetimeManager> Instances = new Dictionary<object, ExplicitLifetimeManager>();

    public void AddInstance<T>(T instance)
    {
        ExplicitLifetimeManager e = new ExplicitLifetimeManager();
        Instances[instance] = e;
        Container.RegisterInstance(instance, e);
    }

    public void RemoveInstance<T>(T instance)
    {
        Instances[instance].RemoveValue();
        Instances.Remove(instance);
    }

calling removevalue on the custom lifetime manager causes the instance to be unregistered

share|improve this answer

I have the same challenge and after experimenting I solved it by using the standard ContainerControlledLifetimeManager and calling RemoveValue when I want to remove the container instance. Note that if you are not using interfaces and your object has constructor which the container can find and use it will recreate the instance after you have destroyed it with lifetimeManager.RemoveValue().

[TestClass]
public class UnityContainerTest
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void RemoveFromContainer()
    {
        UnityContainer container = new UnityContainer();
        MyUnityMember member = new MyUnityMember(5);

        LifetimeManager lifetimeManager = new ContainerControlledLifetimeManager();
        container.RegisterInstance(member, lifetimeManager);

        var resolved = container.Resolve<MyUnityMember>();
        Assert.IsNotNull(resolved);

        lifetimeManager.RemoveValue();

        try
        {
            resolved = container.Resolve<MyUnityMember>();
            Assert.Fail(resolved + " is still in the container");
        }
        catch (ResolutionFailedException)
        {
        }
    }

    public class MyUnityMember
    {
        public MyUnityMember(int x)
        {
            I = x;
        }

        public int I { get; private set; }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I had a similar requirement whereby I wanted to temporarily store objects in the unity container and found this was not possible (or at least easily possible). If your objective is to have a temporary storage place easily available to unity, then create a temporary storage service.

public class TemporaryStorageService : ITemporaryStorageService
{
    public void Deposit<T>(Object o, string key)
    {
        System.Windows.Application.Current.Properties[key] = o;
    }

    public T Withdraw<T>(string key)
    {   T o = (T)System.Windows.Application.Current.Properties[key];
        System.Windows.Application.Current.Properties.Remove(key);
        return o;
    }
}

Register your service with Unity. Then when you wish to store an object you call the Deposit Method and when you wish to remove the object you call the Withdraw method. A fuller explanation can be found here

share|improve this answer
    
link's dead or pointing at wrong place –  quetzalcoatl Jan 23 '13 at 11:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.