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I would like to find out how lucene search works so fast. I can't find any useful docs on the web. If you have anything (short of lucene source code) to read, let me know.

A text search query using mysql5 text search with index takes about 18 minutes in my case. A lucene search for the same query takes less than a second.

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Can I request this question to be converted as a community wiki ? Lucene sounds like a platform now. –  asyncwait Mar 3 at 12:40
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3 Answers

up vote 36 down vote accepted

Lucene is an inverted full-text index. This means that it takes all the documents, splits them into words, and then builds an index for each word. Since the index is an exact string-match, unordered, it can be extremely fast. Hypothetically, an SQL unordered index on a varchar field could be just as fast, and in fact I think you'll find the big databases can do a simple string-equality query very quickly in that case.

Lucene does not have to optimize for transaction processing. When you add a document, it need not ensure that queries see it instantly. And it need not optimize for updates to existing documents.

However, at the end of the day, if you really want to know, you need to read the source. Both things you reference are open source, after all.

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If I understand correctly, the thing that sets text search engines apart is how they handle multi-word searches and joining the results of searches to multiple indexes in real time. I would not suggest consulting Lucene source for this. It would probably be better to read a little about text search theory, @alienCoder's answer helped me. –  Chris Dutrow yesterday
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In a word: indexing.

Lucene creates an index of your document that allows it to search much more quickly.

It's the same difference between a list O(N) data structure and a hash table O(1) data structure. The list has to walk through the entire collection to find what you want. The hash table has an index that lets it figure out exactly where the desired item is and simply fetch it.

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Yes I understand the indexing part, but again, lucene index searches are a lot faster than mysql index searches. How does that happen –  Midhat Apr 24 '10 at 19:19
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Lucene creates an big index. The index contains word id, no of docs where the word is present, the position of the word in those documents. So when you give a single word query it just searches the index (O(1) time complexity). Then the result is ranked using different algorithms. For multiword query just take intersection of the set of files where the words are present. Thus lucene is very very fast.

For more info read this article by Google deelopers- http://infolab.stanford.edu/~backrub/google.html

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Skimmed over that paper, it was pretty helpful. Specifically "4.5 Searching" had the answer I was looking for. Specifically, it sounds like an O(1) hash search is used for individual words, but then an O(n) scan is used to join the results with a 40,000 document limit. I assume a map-reduce algorithm is used to split this work up so that the user gets instantaneous results. –  Chris Dutrow yesterday
    
One popular algorithm is pigeon rank algorithm. Although I don't know much about it. –  alienCoder 20 hours ago
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