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I'm trying to read encrypted struct data from file using fread(). once i get the decrypted struct bytes, I'd like to it put them back into this struct.

struct data
{
  std::string s1;
  std::string s2;
  std::string s3;
  LONG l;
};

how would you convert a struct into bytes which can be reconstructed from bytes?

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2  
Is string std::string? If not, what is it? – anon Apr 24 '10 at 23:17
    
Dave, This is confusing. you're saying that the identifier 'string' inside the struct is actually a typedef of a char*? That's what Neil is asking. – zumalifeguard Apr 24 '10 at 23:41
    
One problem is that the LONG data type isn't well defined... on one computer it might be 32 bits, and on another computer it might be 64 bits. Unless the data is never going to go outside a single computer, it would be better to use int32_t or some other type with a well-defined bit-width. – Jeremy Friesner Apr 25 '10 at 2:31
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is that std::string does not contain the bytes in question, it contains a pointer to the bytes you actually want to store. You should probably save each string as a null terminated string, and then save a raw long after that, in the file.

If you're looking for a "point and click" serialization solution like that provided by .NET, you will not find what you're looking for in C++. Boost's serialization library may be helpful because it will serialize some standard library objects for you, but you'll need your own implementation for a user defined class like that.

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I'd do something like:

struct serialized_data {
  size_t s1_offset;
  size_t s2_offset;
  size_t s3_offset;
  long l;
  char strings[1];
};

serialized_data* serialize (data d) {
    serialized_data* s = malloc(sizeof(serialized_data) + d.s1.length() + d.s2.length() + d.s3.length() + 3);
    s->s1_offset = 0;
    s->s2_offset = d.s1.length() + 1;
    s->s3_offset = s2_offset + d.s2.length() + 1;
    s->l = d.l;
    strcpy(s->strings, d.s1.c_str());
    strcpy(s->strings + s->s2_offset, d.s2.c_str());
    strcpy(s->strings + s->s3_offset, d.s3.c_str());

    return s;
}
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Remember to handle the case where someone passes in garbage offsets/lengths in your deserialization code. – Billy ONeal Apr 25 '10 at 0:03

For the general case, write a function to serialize all members in the structure manually and another to create a structure from a byte stream by deserializing all members in order. You could use scripts to have these functions generated for you (sadly, C++ does not support stuff like Java's reflection).

You could take a look on boost/serialization.

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Convince me why this needed a downvote! – Joshua Apr 25 '10 at 1:15
    
For just one struct this is breaking a butterfly on a wheel, but I think it didn't deserve a downvote too, because he wrote "for the general case". – Axel Gneiting Apr 25 '10 at 1:23
struct data 
{ 
  std::string s1; 
  std::string s2; 
  std::string s3; 
  long l; 
};


int Write(FILE* file, const data* myData)
{
   unsigned long length;

   length = myData->s1.size();
   fwrite((void*) &length, sizeof(length), 1, file);
   fwrite((void*) myData->s1.data(), length, 1, file);
   ... // write the other strings and long here
}

int Read(FILE* file, data* myData)
{
   unsigned long length;
   char* buffer;

   fread((void*) &length, sizeof(length), 1, file);
   buffer = new char[length];
   length = fread(&buffer, length, 1, file);
   myData.s1 = string(buffer, length);
}

Of course, do error checking and what not

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