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I have a 2D numpy array of shape (N,2) which is holding N points (x and y coordinates). For example:

array([[3, 2],
       [6, 2],
       [3, 6],
       [3, 4],
       [5, 3]])

I'd like to sort it such that my points are ordered by x-coordinate, and then by y in cases where the x coordinate is the same. So the array above should look like this:

array([[3, 2],
       [3, 4],
       [3, 6],
       [5, 3],
       [6, 2]])

If this was a normal Python list, I would simply define a comparator to do what I want, but as far as I can tell, numpy's sort function doesn't accept user-defined comparators. Any ideas?


EDIT: Thanks for the ideas! I set up a quick test case with 1000000 random integer points, and benchmarked the ones that I could run (sorry, can't upgrade numpy at the moment).

Mine:   4.078 secs 
mtrw:   7.046 secs
unutbu: 0.453 secs
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6 Answers 6

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Using lexsort:

import numpy as np    
a = np.array([(3, 2), (6, 2), (3, 6), (3, 4), (5, 3)])

ind = np.lexsort((a[:,1],a[:,0]))    

a[ind]
# array([[3, 2],
#       [3, 4],
#       [3, 6],
#       [5, 3],
#       [6, 2]])

@ars's method, slightly modifed by using ravel instead of flatten, yields a nice way to sort a in-place:

a = np.array([(3, 2), (6, 2), (3, 6), (3, 4), (5, 3)])
dt = [('col1', a.dtype),('col2', a.dtype)]
# A `ravel` is a view, not a copy of `a`
b = a.ravel().view(dt)
b.sort(order=['col1','col2'])

Since b is a view of a, sorting b sorts a as well:

print(a)
# [[3 2]
#  [3 4]
#  [3 6]
#  [5 3]
#  [6 2]]
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Ah, I'd seen lexsort in the docs, but I couldn't figure out how it would apply to this problem. Thanks! –  perimosocordiae Apr 25 '10 at 1:31
3  
Yes, I often have difficulty understanding documentation. Examples tend to be far more illuminating. The trouble is, after playing with examples, I reread the docs and find out the docs were perfectly clear... :-) –  unutbu Apr 25 '10 at 2:00
    
This is making a copy of the array, no? –  g33kz0r Feb 21 '11 at 10:31
1  
@Noah: yes, this is making a new array. –  unutbu Feb 21 '11 at 12:04
1  
@Noah: I've modified my answer above to show how to sort a numpy array on multiple indices, in-place. –  unutbu Feb 21 '11 at 20:47

EDIT: removed bad answer.

Here's one way to do it using an intermediate structured array:

from numpy import array

a = array([[3, 2], [6, 2], [3, 6], [3, 4], [5, 3]])

b = a.flatten()
b.dtype = [('x', '<i4'), ('y', '<i4')]
b.sort()
b.dtype = '<i4'
b.shape = a.shape

print b

which gives the desired output:

[[3 2]
 [3 4]
 [3 6]
 [5 3]
 [6 2]]

Not sure if this is quite the best way to go about it though.

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That doesn't quite work, because it loses the association between x and y for my points. –  perimosocordiae Apr 25 '10 at 0:04
    
Oh, you're right; sorry. Updated my answer. –  ars Apr 25 '10 at 0:35
    
Hm. When I run that, I get an error on the b.shape = a.shape line: "ValueError: total size of new array must be unchanged". I'm running Python 2.6.2, with numpy 1.2.1. –  perimosocordiae Apr 25 '10 at 0:48
    
I'm running Python 2.5.4 with numpy 1.3.0. Try upgrading the version of numpy. –  ars Apr 25 '10 at 0:54

You can use np.complex_sort. This has the side effect of changing your data to floating point, I hope that's not a problem:

>>> a = np.array([[3, 2], [6, 2], [3, 6], [3, 4], [5, 3]])
>>> atmp = np.sort_complex(a[:,0] + a[:,1]*1j)
>>> b = np.array([[np.real(x), np.imag(x)] for x in atmp])
>>> b
array([[ 3.,  2.],
       [ 3.,  4.],
       [ 3.,  6.],
       [ 5.,  3.],
       [ 6.,  2.]])
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1  
I think you win the cleverness award; I wouldn't have thought of making the y-coordinates imaginary! –  perimosocordiae Apr 25 '10 at 1:14
    
But dog slow! Sorry, I didn't really consider performance when I posted this. –  mtrw Apr 25 '10 at 6:15

I was struggling with the same thing and just got help and solved the problem. It works smoothly if your array have column names (structured array) and I think this is a very simple way to sort using the same logic that excel does:

array_name[array_name[['colname1','colname2']].argsort()]

Note the double-brackets enclosing the sorting criteria. And off course, you can use more than 2 columns as sorting criteria.

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I found one way to do it:

from numpy import array
a = array([(3,2),(6,2),(3,6),(3,4),(5,3)])
array(sorted(sorted(a,key=lambda e:e[1]),key=lambda e:e[0]))

It's pretty terrible to have to sort twice (and use the plain python sorted function instead of a faster numpy sort), but it does fit nicely on one line.

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The title says "sorting 2D arrays". To generalize the case of (N,2) arrays to any (N,M) array one can do this:

a[np.lexsort(np.transpose(a)[::-1])]

This is just a generalization of unutbu's solution.

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