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Let's say I have this:

float i = 1.5

in binary, this float is represented as:

0 01111111 10000000000000000000000

I broke up the binary to represent the 'signed', 'exponent' and 'fraction' chunks.

What I don't understand is how this represents 1.5.

The exponent is 0 once you subtract the bias (127 - 127), and the fraction part with the implicit leading one is 1.1.

How does 1.1 scaled by nothing = 1.5???

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You mean "sign," "exponent" and "significand." –  WhirlWind Apr 25 '10 at 1:55
    
hah i wasn't meaning to use the technical terms. just what they represent :) –  NMoney Apr 25 '10 at 2:00
    
title of the question should rather be "how to understand floating point numbers in binary" or something like that - it is actually not related to C –  leonbloy Apr 25 '10 at 2:24
    
Updated title to reflect the fact that C doesn't pin down the encoding at all, and that hatorade is really asking about the IEEE-754 format. –  Stephen Canon Apr 25 '10 at 2:36
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4 Answers 4

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Think first in terms of decimal (base 10): 643.72 is:

  • (6 * 102) +
  • (4 * 101) +
  • (3 * 100) +
  • (7 * 10-1) +
  • (2 * 10-2)

or 600 + 40 + 3 + 7/10 + 2/100.

That's because n0 is always 1, n-1 is the same as 1/n (for a specific case) and n-m is identical to 1/nm (for more general case).

Similarly, the binary number 1.1 is:

  • (1 * 20) +
  • (1 * 2-1)

with 20 being one and 2-1 being one-half.

In decimal, the numbers to the left of the decimal point have multipliers 1, 10, 100 and so on heading left from the decimal point, and 1/10, 1/100, 1/1000 heading right (i.e., 102, 101, 100, decimal point, 10-1, 10-2, ...).

In base-2, the numbers to the left of the binary point have multipliers 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and so on heading left. The numbers to the right have multipliers 1/2, 1/4, 1/8 and so on heading right.

So, for example, the binary number:

101.00101
| |   | |
| |   | +- 1/32
| |   +---  1/8
| +-------    1
+---------    4

is equivalent to:

4 + 1 + 1/8 + 1/32

or:

    5
5  --
   32
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3  
It's simply "binary point" –  Tyler McHenry Apr 25 '10 at 2:24
    
Thanks, @Tyler, that looks and sounds much better. –  paxdiablo Apr 25 '10 at 2:28
    
Very nice answer, pax. –  Stephen Canon Apr 25 '10 at 2:33
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1.1 in binary is 1 + .5 = 1.5

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The mantissa is essentially shifted by the exponent.

3 in binary is 0011
3>>1 in binary, equal to 3/2, is 0001.1
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You want to read this - IEEE 754-1985

The actual standard is here

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The actual pdfs of all these standards can usually be found by a Google search… –  Potatoswatter Apr 25 '10 at 2:21
    
@PotatoSwatter That is my point - GIMF –  Romain Hippeau Apr 25 '10 at 2:29
    
The wikipedia page isn't the standard, and shouldn't be used as such. That's (I think) Potatoswatter's point. –  Stephen Canon Apr 25 '10 at 2:34
    
Added IEEE site to actual standard - The first site explains it in more layman terms. –  Romain Hippeau Apr 25 '10 at 2:48
    
My point was also that they can be found for free. I thought about providing a link but that would probably be unwise :v( . –  Potatoswatter Apr 25 '10 at 3:05
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