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>>> class Abcd:

...     a = ''
...     menu = ['a', 'b', 'c']
... 
>>> a = Abcd()
>>> b = Abcd()
>>> a.a = 'a'
>>> b.a = 'b'
>>> a.a
'a'
>>> b.a
'b'

It's all correct and each object has own 'a', but...

>>> a.menu.pop()
'c'
>>> a.menu
['a', 'b']
>>> b.menu
['a', 'b']

How could this happen? And how to use list as class attribute?

share|improve this question
    
You're definitely not the first to run into this. I remember hitting this issue for the first time: it took me days to figure out what the problem was. It makes sense once you learn it, but I personally think it's really unintuitive. –  Sasha Chedygov Apr 25 '10 at 7:48
    
@musicfreak: I really don't get why people are confused by this. By looking at any OO example in any tutorial you will learn this. Why anyone would prefer to waste "days" instead of investing a few hours to read a tutorial is beyond me. –  nikow Apr 25 '10 at 11:56
    
-1: There are tons of duplicates for this. –  nikow Apr 25 '10 at 11:57
    
It sounds like you don't want a class attribute, but rather an instance attribute. How to do this is covered in the official tutorial docs.python.org/tut and in books like tinyurl.com/thinkcspy2e –  Mike Graham Apr 25 '10 at 15:18
    
I came from php and java, for me this conceptions (as "and or" feature and private/protected policy) are strange –  Eugene Apr 25 '10 at 15:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is because the way you're initializing the menu property is setting all of the instances to point to the same list, as opposed to different lists with the same value.

Instead, use the __init__ member function of the class to initialize values, thus creating a new list and assigning that list to the property for that particular instance of the class:

class Abcd:
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = ''
        self.menu = ['a', 'b', 'c']
share|improve this answer
    
But, that about different between simple string attribute and list attribute? Why? –  Eugene Apr 25 '10 at 7:23
1  
Because it's the difference between a reference and a value. If you did a.menu = ['a','b'], then b.menu would be left unchanged - but you're not, you're changing the list pointed to by a.menu. –  Amber Apr 25 '10 at 7:28

because variables in Python are just "labels"

both Abcd.menu and a.menu reference the same list object.

in your case you should assign the label to a new object,

not modify the object inplace.

You can run

a.menu = a.menu[:-1]

instead of

a.menu.pop()

to feel the difference

share|improve this answer

See class-objects in the tutorial, and notice the use of self.

Use instance attributes, not class attributes (and also, new style classes) :

>>> class Abcd(object):
...     def __init__(self):
...         self.a = ''
...         self.menu = ['a','b','c']
...         
>>> a=Abcd()
>>> b=Abcd()
>>> a.a='a'
>>> b.a='b'
>>> a.a
'a'
>>> b.a
'b'
>>> a.menu.pop()
'c'
>>> a.menu
['a', 'b']
>>> b.menu
['a', 'b', 'c']
>>> 
share|improve this answer
    
You might want to note that all classes are automatically new-style classes in the Python 3.0+ line. –  Michael Aaron Safyan Apr 25 '10 at 7:24

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