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Suppose i have:

class A
{
    A(A& foo){ ..... }
    A& operator=(const A& p) {  }
}

...
A lol;
...

A wow(...)
{

    return lol;
}

...
...
A stick;
stick = wow(...);

Then I'll get a compile error in the last line. But if I add 'const' before 'A&', its ok.

I want to know why. Where it's exactly the problem? I dont get why it should be const.

Language: C++

I edited... I think that change its relevant. That gives error.

share|improve this question
    
You may want to add which language you are talking about. –  Pekka 웃 Apr 25 '10 at 7:49
    
C++............ –  fsdfa Apr 25 '10 at 7:50
1  
Ok, so now that it seems that the problem is more complicated than it looked at first sight (several deleted answers would indicate), why don't you change your code to some which is fully compilable except for the error you're seeing and state the exact compiler version you're using. The above cannot really represent your code. Fors starters, nothing in A is public.) –  sbi Apr 25 '10 at 8:24
1  
For your edit, ... did you return *this;? –  KennyTM Apr 25 '10 at 8:34
1  
The key phrase in sbi's comment is 'fully conpilable'. –  Dennis Zickefoose Apr 25 '10 at 8:45

5 Answers 5

I believe the problem you are mentioning is similar to:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2462737/c-object-life-time-of-anonymous-unnamed-variables/2463173#2463173

where the essential point is that in C++ anonymous-temporaries can not be passed by reference but only by const reference.

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The following code compiles perfectly fine with both Comeau and VC9:

class A
{
public:
    A() {}
    A(A&){}
};

A lol;

A wow()
{
    return lol;
}

int main()
{
    A stick;
    stick = wow();
    return 0;
}

If this doesn't compile with your compiler, then I suspect your compiler to be broken. If it does, then that means you should have pasted the real code, instead of supplying a snippet that doesn't resemble the problem you see.

share|improve this answer
    
Why not?, It makes sense, but i dont think thats necessary. –  fsdfa Apr 25 '10 at 7:57
    
The copyconstructor its called in teh return of the function, the assigment its another thing (in fact, i override it with const) –  fsdfa Apr 25 '10 at 8:01
    
wow copies lol into its return value. Then the return value is assigned to stick via your assignment operator. The assignment operator accepts const references, so it doesn't mind that you are providing it with an r-value. –  Dennis Zickefoose Apr 25 '10 at 8:42
    
@Dennis: Wouldn't the compiler generate a cctor? Or wouldn't it because the non-const one serves? –  sbi Apr 25 '10 at 18:51
    
A default copy-constructor is only generated if you don't provide a copy constructor yourself. Since A(A&) is a copy constructor, A(const A&) will not be automatically generated even if you need one. –  Dennis Zickefoose Apr 25 '10 at 19:17

The call to wow results in a temporary object, an r-value. R-values can not be assigned to non-const references. Since your copy constructor accepts non-const references, you can not pass the result of the call to wow directly to it. This is why adding the const fixes the problem. Now the copy constructor accepts const references, which r-values bind to just fine.

Chances are, your copy constructor does not change the object it is copying, so the paramter should be passed by const-reference. This is how copy constructors are expected to work, except in specific, documented circumstances.

But as sbi points out in his answer, this copy constructor shouldn't be getting called at all. So while this is all true, it likely has nothing to do with your problem. Unless there is a compiler bug. Perhaps your compiler sees the two-step construction, and decided it'll cut out the middle man by converting A stick; stick = wow(); into A stick = wow(); But this would be a bug, as evidenced by the fact that it produces a compile error out of perfectly legal code. But without actual code, its impossible to say what's really happening. There should be several other errors before any issues with your copy constructor come up.

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That's what I thought, too, at first. But given A stick; stick = wow(...);, why is that copy ctor called at the caller's side of the wow() call? –  sbi Apr 25 '10 at 8:17
    
Yeah, I just noticed that myself, and was about to edit my answer. –  Dennis Zickefoose Apr 25 '10 at 8:30
    
...and the you got stuck, as I did. :) –  sbi Apr 26 '10 at 15:28

Not reproducible. Are you missing the default constructor, or forgot to make the constructors public?

See http://www.ideone.com/nPsHj.

(Note that, a copy constructor can take an cv A& argument with any const-volatile combination plus some default arguments. See §[class.copy]/2 in C++ standard.)


Edit: Interesting, g++-4.3 (ideone) and 4.5 (with -pedantic flag) don't have the compile error, but g++-4.2 do complain:

x.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
x.cpp:19: error: no matching function for call to ‘A::A(A)’
x.cpp:7: note: candidates are: A::A(A&)
share|improve this answer
    
I guess GCC has other standars. –  fsdfa Apr 25 '10 at 8:07
    
@fsdfa: Which compiler (and version) are you using? –  KennyTM Apr 25 '10 at 8:08
    
3.4.5 MINGW. With and without pedantic I have the error. I dont know teh correspondences between mingw versions and others. Intresiting... maybe its only the compile that force it as a good practice of coding. I have exactly that error –  fsdfa Apr 25 '10 at 8:12
2  
In the provided code, the default assignment operator is being used rather than the provided copy constructor. Which is appropriate, because you aren't constructing an object, you are assigning to it. The default assignment operator operates on const references, so everything is okay. The earlier compilers were probably being overly aggressive with their optimization. –  Dennis Zickefoose Apr 25 '10 at 8:26
    
@fsdfa: Why not upgrade the MinGW? The latest version is 4.5.0.1. –  KennyTM Apr 25 '10 at 8:46

This function:

A wow(...) 
{  ... }

returns an object of by value.
This means it is copied back to the point where the function was called.

This line:

stick = wow(...);  

Does a copy construction on stick.
The value copied into stick is the value copied back from the function wow().
But remember that the result of the call to wow() is a temporary object (it was copied back from wow() but is not in a variable yet).

So now we look at the copy constructor for A:

A(A& foo){ ..... }

You are trying to pass a temporary object to a reference parameter. This is not allowed. A temporary object can only be bound to a const reference. There are two solutions to the problem:

1) Use a const reference.
2) Pass by value into the copy constructor.

Unfortunately if you use solution (2) you get a bit stuck as it becomes a circular dependency. Passing by value involves using the copy constructor so you enter an infinte loop. So your solution is to use pass by const reference.

share|improve this answer
    
@Martin: stick = wow(...); does assignment on stick, not copy-construction. (I ran into that trap, too.) –  sbi Apr 25 '10 at 8:26
    
The code in the question either isn't the code fsdfa is working with or it's a broken compiler. See my answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/2707534/2707542#2707542 –  sbi Apr 25 '10 at 8:33

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