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#include<stdio.h>

#define a(x) (x * x) 

int main() 
{
    int i = 3, j;

    j = a(i + 1);
    printf("%d", j);

    return 0;
}

I want to know why the program is not giving the output 16. (I'm getting the output 7.)


I understood the point very much but if the program is like this:

#include<stdio.h>

#define a(x) (x * x)

int main()
{
    int i = 3, j, k;

    j = a(i++);
    k = a(++i);
    printf("%d\n%d", j, k);

    return 0;
} 

Then why does the above program give the following output:

9
49
share|improve this question
1  
Needs homework tag ? –  Paul R Apr 25 '10 at 8:14
1  
@Paul What does it matter in this particular case if it's the context of homework? Maybe it is, maybe the OP has very well reduced the problem to a minimum program that exhibits the behavior that puzzles them. I'm not saying it's a good question, I'm saying that (for once) it's not a bad question because it may or may not be homework. Unless the homework is "why does this program print 7?", in which case it's a bad question for being homework. –  Pascal Cuoq Apr 25 '10 at 8:21
1  
@Pascal: the main reason is that it's homework then it's better to give helpful hints or general guidance rather than complete solutions, so that you help the student to learn something. If it's not homework then obviously a complete solution is appropriate. –  Paul R Apr 25 '10 at 9:02
    
@Paul Good point. –  Pascal Cuoq Apr 25 '10 at 9:04

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Because you made a bad macro:

a(i + 1)

expands to

i + 1 * i + 1

which is equivalent to

i + i + 1

or

2 * i + 1

Use parenthesis:

#define a(x) ((x) * (x))

And then you'll get it to expand to

(i + 1) * (i + 1)

which does what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks buddy .... –  sandy101 Apr 25 '10 at 8:19
    
can u tell me what is the problem in the new macros .... –  sandy101 Apr 25 '10 at 8:32
2  
@sandy101: The problem with the edited code is that it changes i twice without an intervening sequence point. That's invoking undefined behavior. (Or is it unspecified in this case? Anyway, the result could be different for different compilers, moon phases and whatnot) –  sbi Apr 25 '10 at 8:36
3  
@sbi Undefined, definitely. @sandy Please do not change the question into another question by editing it, suddenly all the answers become wrong or incomplete. Your second question has been beaten to death here, plus it attracts the kind of people who say that if you were a proper engineer you should be able to predict what undefined constructs do. Please, so a StackOverflow search. –  Pascal Cuoq Apr 25 '10 at 8:50

Read up on C operator precedence and think about what the macro a expands to in this case.

share|improve this answer

After preprocessing the line

j=a(i+1);

will be:

j=(i+1*i+1);

which when evaluated for i=3 will give j=7:

j=(3+1*3+1);

To get the desired result you need to define the macro as:

#define a(x) ((x)*(x)) 

which results in:

j=((i+1)*(i+1));

and gives the result 16 when i=3

share|improve this answer
    
can u tell me the problem with the new macros –  sandy101 Apr 25 '10 at 8:33

Because a(i+1) gets preprocessed into (i+1*i+1).

And 3+3+1 = 7.

You might want to use parenthesis around x.

edit: Wow, is this redundant or what. :/

share|improve this answer

Another write-up for the explanation is at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_preprocessor#Precedence

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Because your macro is wrong. Apparently it works, but the error is more subtle (not quite, but still), as the expanded code has some issues, by not following the expected order of operations.

j = a(i+1) will expand to j = i + 1 * i + 1 which is 7.

If you want to resolve your problem redefine your macro as:

#define a(x) ((x)*(x))

It's good that you've encountered this problem now, and not later. Those type of errors, are sometimes very hard to debug, but now you'll know how to write "professional" macros :).

share|improve this answer

Because a(i+1) gets preprocessed into (i+1*i+1).

And 3+3+1 = 7.

You might want to use parenthesis around x.

edit: Wow, is this redundant or what. :/

link|flag

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