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The Emacs cperl-mode seems to get confused less than perl-mode, but the Skittles effect makes the thing unusable for me. Does anyone have or know of an example of a .emacs block that causes cperl-mode to use the colorization from perl-mode, ideally in a form readable enough that I can go back and turn back on the default colors one element at a time until I reach something I'm comfortable with?

In particular there is a hideously shade of light green used for some builtins that I find quite unreadable, and I prefer my variables to not have the leading $ and $$ and such tinted red along with the variable name. Most of the rest are merely distracting.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Press M-x customize-group RET cperl-faces RET and change coloring to your liking.

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This doesn't quite cover everything, like allowing me to prevent colorization of leading glyphs, but it looks like this is as close as I'm going to get, thanks. – Zed Nov 14 '08 at 20:31

With colour themes, the problem is limited to arrays and hashes - and it turns out that that's because cperl-mode defines those faces as being bold-weight, which colour themes don't appear to affect (Solarized doesn't).

In Emacs 23.3 on Mac OS, the following restored the colours to how the colour theme defined them:

 '(cperl-array-face ((t (:weight normal))))
 '(cperl-hash-face ((t (:weight normal))))
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You can change the color theme if you don't like the particular default colors.

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This doesn't help. ColorTheme appears to change all the colors except the ones used by cperl-mode, and it doesn't change the colorization of leading glyph, and it doesn't appear to be particularly configurable. But thanks for the idea. – Zed Nov 7 '08 at 16:54
The problem with cperl-mode appears to be purely limited to arrays and hashes - at least when I tried with Solarize (, that was the only area where colours weren't overridden. – Sam Kington May 5 '11 at 19:41

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