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Usually when code needs some resource that needs to be released I see it done like this:

InputStream in = null;
try{
    in = new FileInputStream("myfile.txt");
    doSomethingWithStream(in);
}finally{
    if(in != null){
        in.close();
    }
}

What I don't like is that you have to initialize the variable to null and after that set it to another value and in the finally block check if the resource was initialized by checking if it is null. If it is not null, it needs to be released. I know I'm nitpicking, but I feel like this could be done cleaner.

What I would like to do is this:

InputStream in = new FileInputStream("myfile.txt");
try{
    doSomethingWithStream(in);
}finally{
    in.close();
}

To my eyes this looks almost as safe as the previous one. If resource initialization fails and it throws an exception, there's nothing to be done(since I didn't get the resource) so it doesn't have to be inside the try block. The only thing I'm worried is if there is some way(I'm not Java certified) that an exception or error can be thrown between operations?

Even simpler example:

Inputstream in = new FileInputStream("myfile.txt");
in.close();

Is there any way the stream would be left open that a try-finally block would prevent?

Edit:

Maybe I should have left out the last example because it confuses everyone. This is not supposed to be a beginner level question. I know what try-finally does and I know that it is not safe if there was doSomethingWithStream in the middle in the last example. That is why it is not there. I accepted Eyals answer because it was precisely what I was looking for. There is a way to cause an exception between two operations, which would make the middle example unsafe(using Thread.stop), but since it is made using deprecated call and can mess you up no matter what you do so I feel safe using the middle example.

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1  
By the way, if you are using Apache Commons, you can IOUtils.closeQuietly(in). This utility function checks for null and suppresses IOException as you are probably not interested in exceptions on closing anyway. –  doublep Apr 25 '10 at 12:48
    
@doublep: thanks for the tip. Seems like there is a lot of other useful stuff there too. –  palto Apr 25 '10 at 12:53
    
For clarification, in the last example the doSomethingWithStream is left out intentionally. –  palto Apr 25 '10 at 12:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Actually, an exception can occur between the 2 calls in the last code sample,and leave the resource open. If the thread is stopped violently by another thread using the Thread.stop() or Thread.stop(Throwable) immediately after the stream construction, the thread will throw an exception (ThreadDeath in the first case), and the resources will not be disposed of.

But this is exactly why these methods are deprecated...

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Do you think this is a serious enough issue that I shouldn't use the way I'm releasing the stream? –  palto Apr 25 '10 at 13:01
    
True, but adding try-finally will not help. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Apr 25 '10 at 13:03
    
Why wouldn't it help? I mean if the last example would be guarded like the first example, wouldn't it be safe even from ThreadDeath error? –  palto Apr 25 '10 at 13:05
1  
@palto: Imagine if the exception is thrown after the resource is acquired but before the assignment to the variable... –  Jon Skeet Apr 25 '10 at 13:10
    
@Jon Skeet: That would be a bug in the resource acquisition code, not mine. Not my problem :) –  palto Apr 25 '10 at 13:14

The middle sample is safe - the last one isn't.

A try-finally block means that the stream is closed even if doSomethingWithStream throws an exception. Yes, you could catch all exceptions and then close the stream that way - but it's much simpler to let the exception bubble up to the caller, but close the stream on the way via the finally block.

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2  
The last one is safe as it is, but I guess intention was to put doSomethingWithStream(in) in between. Then it wouldn't be safe, of course. –  doublep Apr 25 '10 at 12:44
    
Why is the last one not safe? (I was too slow, doublep answered alread) –  palto Apr 25 '10 at 12:44
    
The intention was not to put the doSomethingWithStream(in) between the calls in the last example. I guess the question is more like "Can something go wrong between these two operations". –  palto Apr 25 '10 at 12:47
1  
Suppose an exception stops the close from being run. There's no guarantee how long it will be before the FileInputStream is garbage-collected (if ever), and until then the underlying file handle will be open. The total number of file handles that may be open at once in a process is usually fairly small (a few thousand is a common limit) so a leak of FDs, i.e., a leak of FileInputStream objects, is serious. –  Donal Fellows Apr 25 '10 at 12:53
2  
@palto: if you're genuinely doing nothing with the stream then I guess it's safe... but pretty pointless. How often do you open a stream and then just close it? Personally I'd still use a finally block in that case, so that it's easier to modify the code later without introducing a bug. –  Jon Skeet Apr 25 '10 at 13:00

Look into Project Lombok. It has a @Cleanup annotation which is settable on local variables which will auto-generate code at compilation time to clean up the resource.

 import lombok.Cleanup;
 import java.io.*;

 public class CleanupExample {
   public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
     @Cleanup InputStream in = new FileInputStream(args[0]);
     @Cleanup OutputStream out = new FileOutputStream(args[1]);
     byte[] b = new byte[10000];
     while (true) {
       int r = in.read(b);
       if (r == -1) break;
       out.write(b, 0, r);
     }
   }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Looks interesting, but seems like it is pretty much married to Eclipse and I use Netbeans. –  palto Apr 25 '10 at 20:16
    
I'm not happy about the way it mishandles Eclipse either, to be honest. It uses bytecode rewriting and changes methods in-memory for which the API could change at any time. –  Chris Dennett Apr 25 '10 at 20:18

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