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I really haven't found normal example of PHP file where MySQL transactions are being used. Can you show me simple example of that?

And one more question. I've already done a lot of programming and didn't use transactions. Can I put a PHP function or something in header.php that if one mysql_query fails, then the others fail too?


I think I have figured it out, is it right?:

mysql_query("SET AUTOCOMMIT=0");
mysql_query("START TRANSACTION");

$a1 = mysql_query("INSERT INTO rarara (l_id) VALUES('1')");
$a2 = mysql_query("INSERT INTO rarara (l_id) VALUES('2')");

if ($a1 and $a2) {
    mysql_query("COMMIT");
} else {        
    mysql_query("ROLLBACK");
}
share|improve this question
3  
You can use mysql_query("BEGIN"); instead of sequence mysql_query("SET AUTOCOMMIT=0"); mysql_query("START TRANSACTION"); –  Kirzilla Apr 10 '12 at 10:03
36  
Please, don't use mysql_* functions in new code. They are no longer maintained and are officially deprecated. See the red box? Learn about prepared statements instead, and use PDO or MySQLi - this article will help you decide which. If you choose PDO, here is a good tutorial. –  Neal Dec 28 '12 at 13:57
    
@Kirzilla it didn't work for me. You need to call SET AUTOCOMMIT=0 for BEGIN too. –  Szerémi Attila Jan 6 at 13:53
1  
Does "mysql_query("SET AUTOCOMMIT=0");" set all connections to wait for commit function or it's just for its related connection? –  Hamid Jun 1 at 20:04

7 Answers 7

up vote 158 down vote accepted

The idea I generally use when working with transactions looks like this (semi-pseudo-code):

try {
    // First of all, let's begin a transaction
    $db->beginTransaction();

    // A set of queries; if one fails, an exception should be thrown
    $db->query('first query');
    $db->query('second query');
    $db->query('third query');

    // If we arrive here, it means that no exception was thrown
    // i.e. no query has failed, and we can commit the transaction
    $db->commit();
} catch (Exception $e) {
    // An exception has been thrown
    // We must rollback the transaction
    $db->rollback();
}


Note that, with this idea, if a query fails, an Exception must be thrown:

  • PDO can do that, depending on how you configure it
  • else, with some other API, you might have to test the result of the function used to execute a query, and throw an exception yourself.


Unfortunately, there is no magic involved. You cannot just put an instruction somewhere and have transactions done automatically: you still have to specific which group of queries must be executed in a transaction.

For example, quite often you'll have a couple of queries before the transaction (before the begin) and another couple of queries after the transaction (after either commit or rollback) and you'll want those queries executed no matter what happened (or not) in the transaction.

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11  
Be careful if you are doing operations that may throw exceptions other than db ones. If so, an exception from a non-db statement may cause a rollback inadvertently (even if all the db calls are successful). Normally, you'd think rolling back is a good idea even if the error was not on the db side, but there are times 3rd party/non-critical code may cause not-so-important exceptions, and you still want to continue with the transaction. –  Halil Özgür Jun 1 '12 at 14:10
3  
What is the $db type here? mysqli? –  Jake Jan 30 '13 at 1:15
3  
@Jake See my answer for an example that uses mysqli (similar in style to Pascal's approach). –  EleventyOne Jul 23 '13 at 7:57
1  
it can easily be modified to catch PDOException and even check exception values if needed. us2.php.net/PDOException –  Yamiko Nov 13 '13 at 22:55
    
what happens if you omit the $db->rollback(); and an exception is thrown? –  Clox Mar 26 at 21:31

I think I have figured it out, is it right?:

mysql_query("START TRANSACTION");

$a1 = mysql_query("INSERT INTO rarara (l_id) VALUES('1')");
$a2 = mysql_query("INSERT INTO rarara (l_id) VALUES('2')");

if ($a1 and $a2) {
    mysql_query("COMMIT");
} else {        
    mysql_query("ROLLBACK");
}
share|improve this answer
16  
no need to set autocommit=0. transactions always work that way. –  babonk Nov 27 '10 at 6:58
    
@babonk - not sure this is the case with InnoDB? –  buggedcom Oct 12 '11 at 13:47
    
@buggedcom This applies to all database engines. –  Michael Mior Oct 19 '11 at 13:24
5  
I think once you start a transaction it works as if AUTOCOMMIT=0 –  babonk Dec 5 '11 at 20:33
1  
@babonk is right. Once a transaction is started AUTOCOMMIT=0 is being set implicitly and after the transaction ends either by commit or rollback, MySql sets back the AUTOCOMMIT value that was used before starting the transaction. NOTE: You should NOT set AUTOCOMMIT=0, because after commiting the changes if you decide to insert/update another row you should commit it explicitly. –  Stefan Jan 21 '13 at 16:24
<?php
// trans.php
function begin()
{
mysql_query("BEGIN");
}

function commit()
{
mysql_query("COMMIT");
}

function rollback()
{
mysql_query("ROLLBACK");
}

mysql_connect("localhost","Dude1", "SuperSecret") or die(mysql_error());

mysql_select_db("bedrock") or die(mysql_error());

$query = "INSERT INTO employee (ssn,name,phone) values ('123-45-6789','Matt','1-800-555-1212')";

begin(); // transaction begins

$result = mysql_query($query);

if(!$result)
{
rollback(); // transaction rolls back
echo "transaction rolled back";
exit;
}
else
{
commit(); // transaction is committed
echo "Database transaction was successful";
}

?>
share|improve this answer
    
For a broad and high profile question like this, it would be great if the answers also reflected that. Your code sample is great, but can you elaborate more? Explain about transactions, why, when and where? Finally, link the code with your explanation. –  Dennis Haarbrink Oct 18 '12 at 10:13
1  
Welcome on StackOverflow. Please always write some describing text to your answer. –  Adrian Lang Oct 18 '12 at 10:13
2  
sorry im begginer, and my bad english, its very easy examle of code - for begginers - commit() rollback() begin() put in class DB (for example), $query - not once - maybe $query0 $query1 - then chek them - i use this code, this very easy to understand =) –  Gedzberg Alex Oct 18 '12 at 10:55
6  
His comments make the example pretty clear. Good code shouldn't need describing text. Also the question asks for a simple example. I like this answer. –  J.Money Oct 25 '12 at 0:20

As this is the first result on google for "php mysql transaction", I thought I'd add an answer that explicitly demonstrates how to do this with mysqli (as the original author wanted examples). Here's a simplified example of transactions with PHP/mysqli:

// let's pretend that a user wants to create a new "group". we will do so
// while at the same time creating a "membership" for the group which
// consists solely of the user themselves (at first). accordingly, the group
// and membership records should be created together, or not at all.
// this sounds like a job for: TRANSACTIONS! (*cue music*)

$group_name = "The Thursday Thumpers";
$member_name = "EleventyOne";
$conn = new mysqli($db_host,$db_user,$db_passwd,$db_name); // error-check this

// note: this is meant for InnoDB tables. won't work with MyISAM tables.

try {

    $conn->autocommit(FALSE); // i.e., start transaction

    // assume that the TABLE groups has an auto_increment id field
    $query = "INSERT INTO groups (name) ";
    $query .= "VALUES ('$group_name')";
    $result = $conn->query($query);
    if ( !$result ) {
        $result->free();
        throw new Exception($conn->error);
    }

    $group_id = $conn->insert_id; // last auto_inc id from *this* connection

    $query = "INSERT INTO group_membership (group_id,name) ";
    $query .= "VALUES ('$group_id','$member_name')";
    $result = $conn->query($query);
    if ( !$result ) {
        $result->free();
        throw new Exception($conn->error);
    }

    // our SQL queries have been successful. commit them
    // and go back to non-transaction mode.

    $conn->commit();
    $conn->autocommit(TRUE); // i.e., end transaction
}
catch ( Exception $e ) {

    // before rolling back the transaction, you'd want
    // to make sure that the exception was db-related
    $conn->rollback(); 
    $conn->autocommit(TRUE); // i.e., end transaction   
}

Also, keep in mind that PHP 5.5 has a new method mysqli::begin_transaction. However, this has not been documented yet by the PHP team, and I'm still stuck in PHP 5.3, so I can't comment on it.

share|improve this answer
1  
On a related note, I just discovered that if you're working with InnoDB tables, it IS possible to lock/unlock tables when using the autocomitt() approach to transactions, but it is NOT possible when using the begin_transaction() approach: MySQL documentation –  EleventyOne Jul 12 '13 at 23:04
    
+1 for detailed (and commented) example with actual mysqli code. Thanks for this. And your point about locking/transactions is very interesting indeed. –  a.real.human.being Aug 31 '13 at 1:27
    
Does "autocommit(FALSE)" will affect to another connection in same database/table ? I mean if we open two pages that one of them set its connection to "autocommit(FALSE)" but other one left the autocommit function, does it wait for commit function or not. I want to know if autocommit is an attribute for connections and not for database/table. Thanks –  Hamid Jun 1 at 20:02
1  
@Hamid $conn->autocommit(FALSE), in the example above, is only affecting the individual connection - it has no effect on any other connections to the database. –  EleventyOne Jun 2 at 3:03

Please check which storage engine you are using, if it is MyISAM then Transaction('COMMIT','ROLLBACK') will be not supported .Because innodb storage engine support the transactions not MyISAM.

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I had this, but not sure if this is correct. Could try this out also.

mysql_query("START TRANSACTION");
$flag = true;
$query = "INSERT INTO testing (myid) VALUES ('test')";

$query2 = "INSERT INTO testing2 (myid2) VALUES ('test2')";

$result = mysql_query($query) or trigger_error(mysql_error(), E_USER_ERROR);
if (!$result) {
$flag = false;
}

$result = mysql_query($query2) or trigger_error(mysql_error(), E_USER_ERROR);
if (!$result) {
$flag = false;
}

if ($flag) {
mysql_query("COMMIT");
} else {        
mysql_query("ROLLBACK");
}

Idea from here: http://www.phpknowhow.com/mysql/transactions/

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I made a function to get a vector of queries and do a transaction, maybe someone will find out it useful:

function transaction ($con, $Q){
        mysqli_query($con, "START TRANSACTION");

        for ($i = 0; $i < count ($Q); $i++){
            if (!mysqli_query ($con, $Q[$i])){
                echo 'Error! Info: <' . mysqli_error ($con) . '> Query: <' . $Q[$i] . '>';
                break;
            }   
        }

        if ($i == count ($Q)){
            mysqli_query($con, "COMMIT");
            return 1;
        }
        else {
            mysqli_query($con, "ROLLBACK");
            return 0;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

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