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i have a method that looks like this:

   private double GetX()
    {
        if (Servings.Count > 0)
        {
            return Servings[0].X;
        }
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(Description))
        {
            FoodDescriptionParser parser = new FoodDescriptionParser();
            return parser.Parse(Description).X;
        }
        return 0;
    }

and i have another method that looks like this:

  private double GetY()
    {
        if (Servings.Count > 0)
        {
            return Servings[0].Y;
        }
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(Description))
        {
            FoodDescriptionParser parser = new FoodDescriptionParser();
            return parser.Parse(Description).Y;
        }
        return 0;
    }

Is there any way to consolidate this as the only thing different is the property names?

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What version of .NET are you using? I can think of some neat ways to do it in .NET 4. –  sblom Apr 25 '10 at 16:40
    
If you have many such properties, you can use reflection (PropertyDescriptor). Does tend to be slow and not worth if it's only 2-3 properties. –  dbkk Apr 25 '10 at 16:40
    
@sblom - 3.5 is the version of dotnet –  leora Apr 25 '10 at 16:43
    
I don't think the .NET version matters. The C# version matters a lot though. For example, Darin Dimitrov's answer depends on lambda expressions, which have been available since C# 3.0. In older versions you could do a similar thing with anonymous methods. –  Joren Apr 25 '10 at 16:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Make a separate GetServing method:

private Serving GetServing() {
    if (Servings.Count > 0)
        return Servings[0];

    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(Description)) {
        FoodDescriptionParser parser = new FoodDescriptionParser();
        return parser.Parse(Description);
    }
    return null;
}

private double GetX() {
    Serving serving = GetServing();
    if (serving == null) return 0;
    return serving.X;
}

private double GetY() {
    Serving serving = GetServing();
    if (serving == null) return 0;
    return serving.Y;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
You can cut a line with return (serving == null) ? 0 : serving.X –  dbkk Apr 25 '10 at 16:47
3  
+1. I like this a bit better than Dimitrov's lambda approach, because your way is more focused on the meaning, rather than the mechanics of the program. –  Joren Apr 25 '10 at 17:00
    
+1 For code clarity, and not just smartness. –  Nayan Apr 25 '10 at 18:16
private double Get(Func<SomeType, double> valueProvider)
{
    if (Servings.Count > 0)
    {
        return valueProvider(Servings[0]);
    }
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(Description))
    {
        FoodDescriptionParser parser = new FoodDescriptionParser();
        return valueProvider(parser.Parse(Description));
    }
    return 0;
}

Which could be used like this:

var x = Get(value => value.X);
var y = Get(value => value.Y);

Remark: SomeType is the type of Servings[0] which if I understand your code correctly should be the same as the type of parser.Parse(Description).

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Clever and clean, but I have a felling this is using a big hammer on a very small nail. –  dbkk Apr 27 '10 at 6:50

Assuming parser.Parse() returns the same class that Servings[] holds, you could create a null object of that type, for which both X & Y are zero. Then you could have a function that returns the first element of Servings[], if it exists, or new FoodDescriptionParser.Parser(Description), if Description exists, or, finally, that null object. And gather the X or Y as needed.

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