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I have the following code

public class A extends Iterable<Integer> {
    ...
    public Iterator<Integer> iterator() {
        return new Iterator<Integer>() {

            A a;

            public boolean hasNext() {
                ...
            }

            public Integer next() {
                ...
            }

            public void remove(){
                ...
            } 
};

I would like to initialize the "a" field in the anonymous class with the instance of A that iterator method was called on. Is it possible?

Thank you.

share|improve this question
3  
That should be A implements Iterable. – SLaks Apr 25 '10 at 17:36
up vote 11 down vote accepted

You don't need to.

You can call methods on the outer class normally within the inner class.
When you compile it, the compiler will automatically generate a hidden field that contains a reference to the outer class.

To reference this variable yourself, you can write A.this. (A.this is the compiler-generated field and is equivalent to your a field)

share|improve this answer

Try this:

public class A extends Iterable<Integer> {

  public Iterator<Integer> iterator() {

      final A a = this;

      return new Iterator<Integer>() {
        public boolean hasNext() {
            // here you can use 'a'
        }
      }      
  }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Wrong. He wants the outer this. – SLaks Apr 25 '10 at 17:30
2  
The way it is stated is the outer 'this'. If you are in the method iterator() and you ask for 'this' (as I wrote) it refers to the object of which iterator() is a method. So 'a' refers to an object of type 'A'. – rmarimon Apr 25 '10 at 20:14

Use :

A a = A.this
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