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I write a singleton c++ in the follow way:

class A {
    private:
        static A* m_pA;
        A();
        virtual ~A();

    public:
        static A* GetInstance();
        static void FreeInstance();

        void WORK1();
        void WORK2();
        void WORK3();
    }
}

A* A::GetInstance() {
    if (m_pA == NULL)
        m_pA = new A();
    return m_pA;
}

A::~A() {
    FreeInstance()  // Can I write this? are there any potential error?
}

void A::FreeInstance() {
    delete m_pA;
    m_pA = NULL;
}

Thanks! Evan Teran and sep61.myopenid.com 's answer is right, and really good! My way is wrong, I wish any one writting such code can avoid my silly mistake.

My singleton A in my project has a vector of smart pointer, and another thread can also edit this vector, so when the application is closing, it always become unstable even I add lots of CMutex. Multithread error + singleton error wasted me 1 day.

//----------------------------------------------------------- A new singleton, you are welcome to edit if you think there is any problem in the following sample:

class A {
    private:
        static A* m_pA;
        explicit A();
        void A(const A& a);
        void A(A &a);
        const A& operator=(const A& a);
        virtual ~A();

    public:
        static A* GetInstance();
        static void FreeInstance();

        void WORK1();
        void WORK2();
        void WORK3();
    }
}

A* A::GetInstance() {
    if (m_pA == NULL){
        static A self;
        m_pA = &self;
    }
    return m_pA;
}

A::~A() {
}
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4  
An interesting discussion on how to properly implement a singleton, along with thread-safety in C++ can be found in this paper: aristeia.com/Papers/DDJ%5FJul%5FAug%5F2004%5Frevised.pdf –  Matthieu N. Oct 30 '09 at 11:36

9 Answers 9

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can avoid needing to delete it by using a static object like this:

if(m_pA == 0) {
    static A static_instance;
    m_pA = &static_instance;
}
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3  
Big note: if you are using multithreading, you should be incredibly careful about doing this. See stackoverflow.com/questions/246564/… for why it is a very very bad idea in general. –  hazzen Nov 7 '08 at 2:57
    
very good point, which is why when using multiple threads there should be mutexes or some other synchronization primitives involved. –  Evan Teran Nov 7 '08 at 3:00
2  
Just don't even try and implement it using double locking, because that can NOT be made to work correctly in C++ (see google for details). –  Loki Astari Nov 7 '08 at 3:04
2  
The best way is to decouple referencing and creation and have the main thread create all singletons before starting any threads that may reference a singleton. Btw returning a reference is in most cases superior to returning a pointer... –  Andreas Magnusson Nov 7 '08 at 9:16
3  
aristeia.com/Papers/DDJ_Jul_Aug_2004_revised.pdf is a good reference on the double checked locking issues in C++. –  xtofl Nov 7 '08 at 11:20

Why does everybody want to return a singleton as a pointer?
Return it as a reference seems much more logical!

You should never be able to free a singleton manually. How do you know who is keeping a reference to the singleton? If you don't know (or can't guarantee) nobody has a reference (in your case via a pointer) then you have no business freeing the object.

Use the static in a function method.
This guarantees that it is created and destroyed only once. It also gives you lazy initialization for free.

class S
{
    public:
        static S& getInstance()
        {
            static S    instance;
            return instance;
        }
    private:
        S() {}
        S(S const&);              // Don't Implement.
        void operator=(S const&); // Don't implement
 };

Note you also need to make the constructor private. Also make sure that you override the default copy constructor and assignment operator so that you can not make a copy of the singleton (otherwise it would not be a singleton).

Also read:

To make sure you are using a singleton for the correct reasons.

Though technically not thread safe in the general case see:
What is the lifetime of a static variable in a C++ function?

GCC has an explicit patch to compensate for this:
http://gcc.gnu.org/ml/gcc-patches/2004-09/msg00265.html

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6  
Another benefit of references is that it is not possible to do this: 'delete A::getInstance()', which is possible with pointers.; –  yoav.aviram Nov 7 '08 at 10:56
2  
I guess everybody wants to optimize prematurely, and they feel like in control when they do the pointer thing. However, even the 'static S instance' clause is to be compiled to a thread-safe construct! Is it? –  xtofl Nov 7 '08 at 11:17
    
Shouldn't the declaration of the assignment operator be S& operator=(S const&);? –  kol Oct 12 at 16:15
    
That is just one way of doing it. There is no standard way. Please try writing the code and verify to yourself that you can not use the assignment operator without a compile time error. The way you write it implies that assignment chaining can be done. Which makes no sense as this is a singleton so there should be no objects to chain together. So in my mind logically this operator= returns void. But in your singelton you may write it to return a reference and it will make no difference. –  Loki Astari Oct 12 at 16:20
    
I know why the assignment operator of a singleton is private, and why it's not implemented. But I think the code is bit more readable if one uses the more common version of the assignment operator, the one which returns a reference to the assignee: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  kol Oct 12 at 16:40

A singleton in C++ can be written in this way:

static A* A::GetInstance() {
    static A sin;
    return &sin;
}
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I do not think there is any reason to write that line no. Your destructor method is not static and your singleton instance will not be destructed in that fashion. I do not think the destructor is necessary, if you need to cleanup the object use the static method you've alread created, FreeInstance().

Other than that, you create your singletons in roughly the same way that I create mine.

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Just don't forget to make the copy constructor and assignment operators private.

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After a period of wild enthusiasm for Meyers-style singletons (using local static objects as in some of the previous answers), I got completely sick of the lifetime management problems in complicated apps.

I tend to find that you end up referencing the 'Instance' method deliberately early in the app's initialisation, to make sure they're created when you want, and then playing all kinds of games with the tear-down because of the unpredictable (or at least very complicated and somewhat hidden) order in which things get destroyed.

YMMV of course, and it depends a bit on the nature of the singleton itself, but a lot of the waffle about clever singletons (and the threading/locking issues which surround the cleverness) is overrated IMO.

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if you read "Modern C++ Design" you'll realize that a singleton design could be much complex than return a static variable.

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This implementation is fine as long as you can answer these questions:

  1. do you know when the object will be created (if you use a static object instead of new? Do you have a main()?)

  2. does you singleton have any dependencies that may not be ready by the time it is created? If you use a static object instead of new, what libraries have been initialized by this time? What your object does in constructor that might require them?

  3. when will it be deleted?

Using new() is safer because you control where and when the object will be created and deleted. But then you need to delete it explicitly and probably nobody in the system knows when to do so. You may use atexit() for that, if it makes sense.

Using a static object in method means that do do not really know when it will be created or deleted. You could as well use a global static object in a namespace and avoid getInstance() at all - it doesn't add much.

If you do use threads, then you're in big trouble. It is virtually impossible to create usable thread safe singleton in C++ due to:

  1. permanent lock in getInstance is very heavy - a full context switch at every getInstance()
  2. double checked lock fails due to compiler optimizations and cache/weak memory model, is very tricky to implement, and impossible to test. I wouldn't attempt to do it in a real system, unless you intimately know your architecture and want it to be not portable

These can be Googled easily, but here's a good link on weak memory model: http://ridiculousfish.com/blog/archives/2007/02/17/barrier.

One solution would be to use locking but require that users cache the pointer they get from getInctance() and be prepared for getInstance() to be heavy.

Another solution would be to let users handle thread safety themselves.

Yet another solution would be to use a function with simple locking and substitute it with another function without locking and checking once the new() has been called. This works, but full implementation is complicated.

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There is a great C++ library, ACE, based on patterns. There's a lot of documentation about different kind of patterns so look at their work: http://www.cs.wustl.edu/~schmidt/ACE.html

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