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EDIT: SORRY!

Turns out that I'm an idiot. The exception was being thrown from another call to r.nextInt() which was taking an uninitialized variable as an argument! Foot is very much in mouth.

I'm really not sure what else to say about this:

Random r = new Random();

class SomeClass {
   public SomeClass(){
       new SomeClass(r.nextInt(5));
   }

   public SomeClass(int i){
   ...

Throws a NullPointerException where r.nextInt(5) is called. Any ideas?

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Tom R, ChrisF, BalusC, Roger Pate, SilentGhost Apr 27 '10 at 14:05

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Where is r declared? – SLaks Apr 25 '10 at 20:45
    
SomeClass is defined within SomeOtherClass, where Random r is declared. – Tom R Apr 25 '10 at 20:48
1  
Have you tried setting r.nextInt(5) to a variable and then passing the variable inside the constructor? – Anthony Forloney Apr 25 '10 at 20:52
4  
    
You're not really showing your code, are you? – James K Polk Apr 25 '10 at 20:59

According to the documentation, nextInt only throws an IllegalArgumentException if the parameter is not positive.

My guess is it that you are not calling it with a literal constant 5, but rather with some variable that happens to be zero (or negative).

share|improve this answer
    
I rather guess that r itself is null. – leonbloy Apr 25 '10 at 21:01
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Turns out that I'm an idiot. The exception was being thrown from another call to r.nextInt() on the same line which was taking an uninitialized variable as an argument! Foot is very much in mouth. Will read more carefully in future.

share|improve this answer
    
No problem, things like that have happened to all of us. :-) Please mark your clarification as "accepted answer" (by clicking on the check mark), so that your question no longer shows up as "unanswered". – Heinzi Apr 25 '10 at 23:53
    
+1 for the confession. As Heinzi says, please accept your own response, as a favour to future seekers who might have made the same bloomer. – APC Apr 26 '10 at 11:49
    
I can't accept it for another 23 hours it says – Tom R Apr 26 '10 at 21:18

I tried reproducing your problem with the sample code. But it works..

import java.util.Random;

public class Test {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Test test1 = new Test();
    SomeClass obj = test1.new SomeClass();
}

private Random r = new Random();

class SomeClass {
       public SomeClass(){
           new SomeClass(r.nextInt(5));
       }

       public SomeClass(int i){
           System.out.println(i);
       }

}

}

share|improve this answer

Too long for a comment, but this code compiles and runs without an NPE. You need to show the code that is a problem. Extract from your current code a short example that demonstrates the issue.

import java.util.Random;

public class SomeOtherClass {
    Random r = new Random();

    class SomeClass {
        public SomeClass() {
            /***/
            new SomeClass(r.nextInt(5));
            /*/
            this(r.nextInt(5)); // Or this.
            /***/
        }

        public SomeClass(int i){
            // ...
        }
    }

    public SomeOtherClass() {
        new SomeClass();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new SomeOtherClass();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I'm not sure what are you trying to do with this,

  public SomeClass(){
       new SomeClass(r.nextInt(5));
   }

but I suspect the correct syntax (if you want to call the other constructor) is

  public SomeClass(){
       this(r.nextInt(5));
   }

You should post the code of the outside class to understand your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not the subject of his problem. (It's highly possible that it's what he was going to do, even though what he did is also completly correct). – Mirek Pluta Apr 25 '10 at 20:56
    
That doesn't explain the NPE. (Indeed, that would always NPE with -target 1.3 or less.) – Tom Hawtin - tackline Apr 25 '10 at 20:58
    
Yes, I know this this does not explain the NPE, but it's surely a bug nonetheless – leonbloy Apr 25 '10 at 21:00
    
Then add it is a comment. (Actually, what I said about 1.3 isn't true. It would be true in a situation involving base classes.) – Tom Hawtin - tackline Apr 25 '10 at 21:08

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