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This is what I would like to do using templates:

struct op1
{
   virtual void Method1() = 0;
}

...

struct opN
{
   virtual void MethodN() = 0;
}

struct test : op1, op2, op3, op4
{
    virtual void Method1(){/*do work1*/};
    virtual void Method2(){/*do work2*/};
    virtual void Method3(){/*do work3*/};
    virtual void Method4(){/*do work4*/};
}

I would like to have a class that simply derives from a template class that provides these method declarations while at the same time making them virtual. This is what I've managed to come up with:

#include <iostream>

template< size_t N >
struct ops : ops< N - 1 >
{
protected:
    virtual void DoStuff(){ std::cout<<N<<std::endl; };
public:
    template< size_t i >
    void Method()
    { if( i < N ) ops<i>::DoStuff(); } 
    //leaving out compile time asserts for brevity
};

template<>
struct ops<0>
{
};

struct test : ops<6>
{
};

int main( int argc, char ** argv )
{
  test obj;
  obj.Method<3>(); //prints 3
  return 0;
}

However, as you've probably guessed, I am unable to override any of the 6 methods I have inherited. I'm obviously missing something here. What is my error? No, this isn't homework. This is curiosity.

share|improve this question
    
Does that even compile? I'd think the compiler would run into an infinite loop trying to instantiate ops<N> ... –  tzaman Apr 25 '10 at 22:00
    
It wouldn't if there was a specialization for ops<1> or ops<0> that terminates it. –  Georg Fritzsche Apr 25 '10 at 22:05
    
I think the problem is that you haven't inherited 6 methods - you've defined one method in the base class and then reimplemented the same method 5 times in the descendents. –  Mike Dinsdale Apr 25 '10 at 22:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Tested with GCC 4.3. Don't even know why I spent time on this :-/

#include <iostream>

template <std::size_t N>
struct mark
{ };

template <std::size_t N>
struct op : op <N - 1>
{
  virtual  void  do_method (const mark <N>&) = 0;
};

template <>
struct op <1>
{
  virtual  void  do_method (const mark <1>&) = 0;
};

struct test : op <2>
{
  template <std::size_t K>
  void
  method ()
  {  do_method (mark <K> ());  }

  virtual  void do_method (const mark <1>&)
  {  std::cout << "1\n";  }

  virtual  void do_method (const mark <2>&)
  {  std::cout << "2\n";  }
};

int
main ()
{
  test  x;

  x.method <1> ();
  x.method <2> ();
}

I don't know how to move the "prettifier" method() template function out of test.

share|improve this answer
1  
You can use one template<size_t N> op for the methods and terminate with an empty specialization template<> struct op<0> {};. –  Georg Fritzsche Apr 25 '10 at 22:34
    
@gf: Good point. –  doublep Apr 25 '10 at 22:37
    
Thank you. I knew the answer had something to do with converting an int to a type and using that to differentiate the functions called. –  Carl Apr 25 '10 at 22:38
template< size_t N >
struct ops : ops< N - 1 >

This codes an endless loop. The recursion doesn't stop when N reaches 0. Add a specialization for the end case, immediately after the primary template:

template<>
struct ops<0> {}

Also, what does this do? Why not just call ops<i>::DoStuff() directly?

template< size_t i >
void Method()
{ if( i < N ) ops<i>::DoStuff(); } 
share|improve this answer
    
Its a runtime version of boost::enable_if. If i is too big, Method just does nothing. –  Dennis Zickefoose Apr 25 '10 at 22:12
    
So we're taking a template which might do anything, and add the possibility it could quietly do nothing if the argument is out of range. Fun. –  Potatoswatter Apr 25 '10 at 22:18
    
True. It does. I should have added in the specialization to terminate the hierarchy. UPDATE: Just did. –  Carl Apr 25 '10 at 22:28
    
Like I said, I left out the out of range compile time assert for brevity. –  Carl Apr 25 '10 at 22:33

To mimic your original desire:

#define MAKE_OPS(N) template<> struct Ops<N> : Ops<N-1> { virtual void Method##N() = 0; }

template<int N>
struct Ops;

template<>
struct Ops<0> { };

MAKE_OPS(1);
MAKE_OPS(2);
template<> struct Ops<3> : Ops<2> { virtual void Method3() { std::cout << "3" << std::endl; } };
MAKE_OPS(4);
MAKE_OPS(5);
MAKE_OPS(6);

struct Test : Ops<3> {
    virtual void Method1() { std::cout << 1 << std::endl; }
    virtual void Method2() { std::cout << 2 << std::endl; }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that would work, but the whole point is that I don't want to have to write a new method declaration for every additional method. Call me lazy, but to me this is exactly the type of stuff that should be able to be auto generated, which is the reason for the this excercise. –  Carl Apr 25 '10 at 22:35
    
@carleeto: I know it isn't quite what you were looking for, but it has the advantage of being able to provide default implementations if whatever obscure use you have in mind calls for it. I also thought there'd be a problem of name-hiding in the alternative if you derived from test, but on further reflection there wouldn't be. –  Dennis Zickefoose Apr 25 '10 at 22:53
    
Lol. Nice! Totally forgot about layering the pre-processor on top. Thank you for reminding me! :) –  Carl Apr 25 '10 at 23:17

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