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I'm writing a LaTeX document in vim, and I have it hard wrapping at 80 characters to make reading easier. However, this causes problems with tracking changes with in version control. For example, inserting "Lorem ipsum" at the beginning of this text:

1 Dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Phasellus bibendum lobortis lectus
2 quis porta. Aenean vestibulum magna vel purus laoreet at molestie massa
3 suscipit. Vestibulum vestibulum, mauris nec convallis ultrices, tellus sapien
4 ullamcorper elit, dignissim consectetur justo tellus et nunc. 

results in:

1 Lorum ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Phasellus bibendum
2 lobortis lectus quis porta. Aenean vestibulum magna vel purus laoreet at
3 molestie massa suscipit. Vestibulum vestibulum, mauris nec convallis ultrices,
4 tellus sapien ullamcorper elit, dignissim consectetur justo tellus et nunc.

When I review this change in git, it tells me that all the lines of the paragraph have changed because of the wrapping, even though only one semantic change has occurred. One way around this problem is to have every sentence on its own line. This looks the same in the rendered document, but the source now is harder to read, because each line has quite a different line length:

1 Lorum ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
2 Phasellus bibendum lobortis lectus quis porta.
3 Aenean vestibulum magna vel purus laoreet at molestie massa suscipit.
4 Vestibulum vestibulum, mauris nec convallis ultrices, tellus sapien ullamcorper elit, dignissim consectetur justo tellus et nunc.

(If I soft wrap at 80, things still look bad, just in a different way.)

Is it possible to have my text on disk with one newline per sentence, but display and edit it in vim as if the text of each paragraph was one long line, soft wrapped at 80 characters? I assume it requires some vim-foo rather than tweaking git or LaTeX.

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Hmm, saw that problem before, i think your guess about soft wrap as a solution is right, but cannot remember where to find that "vim-foo"... –  Gabriel Ščerbák Apr 26 '10 at 1:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

No need to introduce weird editing policies: the git feature you are looking for is using git diff --color-words to review changes.

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2  
Thank you! That was far simpler than I was expecting. –  Bkkbrad Apr 26 '10 at 1:51
3  
To clarify, git still considers all the lines as changed, but it highlights nicely just the words that have been changed. –  Bkkbrad Apr 26 '10 at 1:55
1  
@Bkkbrad: Right, it only changes the way diff presents that change to you. BTW, for git, CVS or SVN you can use vim's diff view with the vcscommand plugin (code.google.com/p/vcscommand). It highlights changed words in addition to changed blocks. –  Benjamin Bannier Apr 26 '10 at 1:56
    
Thanks! I look forward to playing around with that. –  Bkkbrad Apr 26 '10 at 2:05

I think an alternative way is to change the width of the vim window like what I did usually:

  1. at first, put "set wrap" in the .vimrc to enable the "wrap" feature;

  2. For running vim in a virtual terminal, I always set the terminal's window width as 80 characters (like "urxvt -geometry 80x38"). Thus, anytime I edit a file in vim in the virtual terminal, it will automatically wrap when a line contains more than 80 characters.

  3. If you prefer the gvim (gtk-vim, gnome-vim), you can just set the size of the gvim window by adding a line in .gvimrc, like "set lines=38 columns=80".

Hope that helps. :-)

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This is how I solve the problem. First you may use vim command (in normal status) to search your tex file for the lines longer than 80 chars:

/\%81v.\+/

you may define it as a macro so as not to remember the commands. Then you type in the normal status

nF a

(that is, a little "n", a capital "F", a space " ", a little "a", an "Enter", and an ). This help you break your line softly after some word. You may record this five key strokes as a macro (howto: in normal status press "qa" to start recording and just do the steps "nF a" and then press Esc and "q" to stop. When playing, press "@a" because we have stored the macro into "a". To play the macro 100 times (it does not hurt if you play it too many times; it just automatically stops when finishing all the job) by pressing "100@a" in normal status)

Does this solve your problem?

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Sorry, that may be helpful with word-wrapping in vim, but that doesn't really address my question about how to have git understand that a single changed word shouldn't affect an entire paragraph when there is hard-wrapping. Thanks for thinking about the problem, though! –  Bkkbrad Jul 25 '12 at 1:56
    
Somehow I like word-wrapping because I think (despite that maybe you feel wrapped paragraphs hard to read) wrapping not only solves your problem but also facilitates the future work such as code folding, and email patches via gmail (gmail wraps a single line in text mode if it is too long, so if you sent your patches there might be problems). Besides all this, I think LaTeX system encourages people to wrap long paragraphs, for it just treats a single line break as a white space. What do you think? –  Xin Guo Jul 25 '12 at 2:35

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