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Say I have a list of n elements, I know there are n! possible ways to order these elements. What is an algorithm to generate all possible orderings of this list? Example, I have list [a, b, c]. The algorithm would return [[a, b, c], [a, c, b,], [b, a, c], [b, c, a], [c, a, b], [c, b, a]].

I'm reading this here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permutation#Algorithms_to_generate_permutations

But Wikipedia has never been good at explaining. I don't understand much of it.

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I wrote an extensive answer to another question about generating permutations once. I think it'll be of interest to you: stackoverflow.com/questions/1506078/… –  Joren Apr 26 '10 at 1:56
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14 Answers 14

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Basically, for each element from left to right, you generate all the permutations of the remaining elements. You can do this recursively, (or iteratively if you like pain) until you get to the last element at which point there is only one possible order.

So, given a list: [1,2,3,4]

You just generate all permutations that start with 1, then all the permutations that start with 2, then with 3 and 4.

This effectively reduces the problem from one of finding permutations of a list of four elements to a list of three elements. Once you continue reducing to 2 and then 1 element, you have all of them.

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I thought about this at first too but then the current element wouldn't get put in between some of the following. So not all permutations would be generated. –  DeaDEnD Apr 26 '10 at 1:57
    
@LLer sorry, updated my answer from "folllowing" to "remaining" to clarify. It works fine though. Check it by writing the code and verifying that you get 4! different results. –  WhirlWind Apr 26 '10 at 2:05
    
Oh I see what you mean. Thanks I'll try coding it in a bit. –  DeaDEnD Apr 26 '10 at 2:07
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Here is an algorithm in Python that works by in place on an array:

def permute(xs, low=0):
    if low + 1 >= len(xs):
        yield xs
    else:
        for p in permute(xs, low + 1):
            yield p        
        for i in range(low + 1, len(xs)):        
            xs[low], xs[i] = xs[i], xs[low]
            for p in permute(xs, low + 1):
                yield p        
            xs[low], xs[i] = xs[i], xs[low]

for p in permute([1, 2, 3, 4]):
    print p

You can try the code out for yourself here: http://repl.it/J9v

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Wikipedia's answer for "lexicographic order" seems perfectly explicit in cookbook style to me. It cites a 14th century origin for the algorithm!

I've just written a quick implementation in Java of Wikipedia's algorithm as a check and it was no trouble. But what you have in your Q as an example is NOT "list all permutations", but "a LIST of all permutations", so wikipedia won't be a lot of help to you. You need a language in which lists of permutations are feasibly constructed. And believe me, lists a few billion long are not usually handled in imperative languages. You really want a non-strict functional programming language, in which lists are a first-class object, to get out stuff while not bringing the machine close to heat death in the Universe.

That's easy. In standard Haskell or any modern FP language:

-- perms of a list
perms :: [x] -> [[x]]
perms (a:as) = [bs1 ++ a:bs2 | bs <- bss, (bs1,bs2) <- splits bs] 
           where bss = perms as

and

-- list of ways of splitting a list into two parts
splits :: [x] -> [([x],[x])]
splits []     = [([],[])]
splits (a:as) = ([],a:as):[(a:bs,cs) |(bs,cs) <- splits as]
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I was thinking of writing a code for getting the permutations of any given integer of any size, i.e., providing a number 4567 we get all possible permutations till 7654...So i worked on it and found an algorithm and finally implemented it, Here is the code written in "c". You can simply copy it and run on any open source compilers. But some flaws are waiting to be debugged. Please appreciate.

Code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>
#include <malloc.h>

                //PROTOTYPES

int fact(int);                  //For finding the factorial
void swap(int*,int*);           //Swapping 2 given numbers
void sort(int*,int);            //Sorting the list from the specified path
int imax(int*,int,int);         //Finding the value of imax
int jsmall(int*,int);           //Gives position of element greater than ith but smaller than rest (ahead of imax)
void perm();                    //All the important tasks are done in this function


int n;                         //Global variable for input OR number of digits

void main()
{
int c=0;

printf("Enter the number : ");
scanf("%d",&c);
perm(c);
getch();
}

void perm(int c){
int *p;                     //Pointer for allocating separate memory to every single entered digit like arrays
int i, d;               
int sum=0;
int j, k;
long f;

n = 0;

while(c != 0)               //this one is for calculating the number of digits in the entered number
{
    sum = (sum * 10) + (c % 10);
    n++;                            //as i told at the start of loop
    c = c / 10;
}

f = fact(n);                        //It gives the factorial value of any number

p = (int*) malloc(n*sizeof(int));                //Dynamically allocation of array of n elements

for(i=0; sum != 0 ; i++)
{
    *(p+i) = sum % 10;                               //Giving values in dynamic array like 1234....n separately
    sum = sum / 10;
}

sort(p,-1);                                         //For sorting the dynamic array "p"

for(c=0 ; c<f/2 ; c++) {                        //Most important loop which prints 2 numbers per loop, so it goes upto 1/2 of fact(n)

    for(k=0 ; k<n ; k++)
        printf("%d",p[k]);                       //Loop for printing one of permutations
    printf("\n");

    i = d = 0;
    i = imax(p,i,d);                            //provides the max i as per algo (i am restricted to this only)
    j = i;
    j = jsmall(p,j);                            //provides smallest i val as per algo
    swap(&p[i],&p[j]);

    for(k=0 ; k<n ; k++)
        printf("%d",p[k]);
    printf("\n");

    i = d = 0;
    i = imax(p,i,d);
    j = i;
    j = jsmall(p,j);
    swap(&p[i],&p[j]);

    sort(p,i);
}
free(p);                                        //Deallocating memory
}

int fact (int a)
{
long f=1;
while(a!=0)
{
    f = f*a;
    a--;
}
return f;
}


void swap(int *p1,int *p2)
{
int temp;
temp = *p1;
*p1 = *p2;
*p2 = temp;
return;
}


void sort(int*p,int t)
{
int i,temp,j;
for(i=t+1 ; i<n-1 ; i++)
{
    for(j=i+1 ; j<n ; j++)
    {
        if(*(p+i) > *(p+j))
        {
            temp = *(p+i);
            *(p+i) = *(p+j);
            *(p+j) = temp;
        }
    }
}
}


int imax(int *p, int i , int d)
{
    while(i<n-1 && d<n-1)
{
    if(*(p+d) < *(p+d+1))
    {   
        i = d;
        d++;
    }
    else
        d++;
}
return i;
}


int jsmall(int *p, int j)
{
int i,small = 32767,k = j;
for (i=j+1 ; i<n ; i++)
{
    if (p[i]<small && p[i]>p[k])
    {     
       small = p[i];
       j = i;
    }
}
return j;
}
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void permutate(char[] x, int i, int n){
    x=x.clone();
    if (i==n){
        System.out.print(x);
        System.out.print(" ");
        counter++;}
    else
    {
        for (int j=i; j<=n;j++){
     //   System.out.print(temp); System.out.print(" ");    //Debugger
        swap (x,i,j);
      //  System.out.print(temp); System.out.print(" "+"i="+i+" j="+j+"\n");// Debugger
        permutate(x,i+1,n);
    //    swap (temp,i,j);
    }
    }
}

void swap (char[] x, int a, int b){
char temp = x[a];
x[a]=x[b];
x[b]=temp;
}

I created this one. based on research too permutate(qwe, 0, qwe.length-1); Just so you know, you can do it with or without backtrack

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Recursive always takes some mental effort to maintain. And for big numbers, factorial is easily huge and stack overflow will easily be a problem.

For small numbers (3 or 4, which is mostly encountered), multiple loops are quite simple and straight forward. It is unfortunate answers with loops didn't get voted up.

Let's start with enumeration (rather than permutation). Simply read the code as pseudo perl code.

$foreach $i1 in @list
    $foreach $i2 in @list 
        $foreach $i3 in @list
            print "$i1, $i2, $i3\n"

Enumeration is more often encountered than permutation, but if permutation is needed, just add the conditions:

$foreach $i1 in @list
    $foreach $i2 in @list 
        $if $i2==$i1
            next
        $foreach $i3 in @list
            $if $i3==$i1 or $i3==$i2
                next
            print "$i1, $i2, $i3\n"

Now if you really need general method potentially for big lists, we can use radix method. First, consider the enumeration problem:

$n=@list
my @radix
$for $i=0:$n
    $radix[$i]=0
$while 1
    my @temp
    $for $i=0:$n
        push @temp, $list[$radix[$i]]
    print join(", ", @temp), "\n"
    $call radix_increment

subcode: radix_increment
    $i=0
    $while 1
        $radix[$i]++
        $if $radix[$i]==$n
            $radix[$i]=0
            $i++
        $else
            last
    $if $i>=$n
        last

Radix increment is essentially number counting (in the base of number of list elements).

Now if you need permutaion, just add the checks inside the loop:

subcode: check_permutation
    my @check
    my $flag_dup=0
    $for $i=0:$n
        $check[$radix[$i]]++
        $if $check[$radix[$i]]>1
            $flag_dup=1
            last
    $if $flag_dup
        next

Edit: The above code should work, but for permutation, radix_increment could be wasteful. So if time is a practical concern, we have to change radix_increment into permute_inc:

subcode: permute_init
    $for $i=0:$n
        $radix[$i]=$i

subcode: permute_inc                                       
    $max=-1                                                
    $for $i=$n:0                                           
        $if $max<$radix[$i]                                
            $max=$radix[$i]                                
        $else                                              
            $for $j=$n:0                                   
                $if $radix[$j]>$radix[$i]                  
                    $call swap, $radix[$i], $radix[$j]     
                    break                                  
            $j=$i+1                                        
            $k=$n-1                                        
            $while $j<$k                                   
                $call swap, $radix[$j], $radix[$k]         
                $j++                                       
                $k--                                       
            break                                          
    $if $i<0                                               
        break                                              

Of course now this code is logically more complex, I'll leave for reader's exercise.

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Here is a recursive solution in PHP. WhirlWind's post accurately describes the logic. It's worth mentioning that generating all permutations runs in factorial time, so it might be a good idea to use an iterative approach instead.

public function permute($sofar, $input){
  for($i=0; $i < strlen($input); $i++){
    $diff = strDiff($input,$input[$i]);
    $next = $sofar.$input[$i]; //next contains a permutation, save it
    $this->permute($next, $diff);
  }
}

The strDiff function takes two strings, s1 and s2, and returns a new string with everything in s1 without elements in s2 (duplicates matter). So, strDiff('finish','i') => 'fnish' (the second 'i' is not removed).

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As WhirlWind said, you start at the beginning.

You swap cursor with each remaining value, including cursor itself, these are all new instances (I used an int[] and array.clone() in the example).

Then perform permutations on all these different lists, making sure the cursor is one to the right.

When there are no more remaining values (cursor is at the end), print the list. This is the stop condition.

public void permutate(int[] list, int pointer) {
    if (pointer == list.length) {
        //stop-condition: print or process number
        return;
    }
    for (int i = pointer; i < list.length; i++) {
        int[] permutation = (int[])list.clone();.
        permutation[pointer] = list[i];
        permutation[i] = list[pointer];
        permutate(permutation, pointer + 1);
    }
}
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In Scala

    def permutazione(n: List[Int]): List[List[Int]] = permutationeAcc(n, Nil)



def permutationeAcc(n: List[Int], acc: List[Int]): List[List[Int]] = {

    var result: List[List[Int]] = Nil
    for (i ← n if (!(acc contains (i))))
        if (acc.size == n.size-1)
            result = (i :: acc) :: result
        else
            result = result ::: permutationeAcc(n, i :: acc)
    result
}
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Here is an algorithm in R, in case anyone needs to avoid loading additional libraries like I had to.

permutations <- function(n){
    if(n==1){
        return(matrix(1))
    } else {
        sp <- permutations(n-1)
        p <- nrow(sp)
        A <- matrix(nrow=n*p,ncol=n)
        for(i in 1:n){
            A[(i-1)*p+1:p,] <- cbind(i,sp+(sp>=i))
        }
        return(A)
    }
}

Example usage:

> matrix(letters[permutations(3)],ncol=3)
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,] "a"  "b"  "c" 
[2,] "a"  "c"  "b" 
[3,] "b"  "a"  "c" 
[4,] "b"  "c"  "a" 
[5,] "c"  "a"  "b" 
[6,] "c"  "b"  "a" 
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If anyone wonders how to be done in permutation in javascript.

Idea/pseudocode

  1. pick one element at a time
  2. permute rest of the element and then add the picked element to the all of the permutation

for example. 'a'+ permute(bc). permute of bc would be bc & cb. Now add these two will give abc, acb. similarly, pick b + permute (ac) will provice bac, bca...and keep going.

now look at the code

function permutations(arr){

   var len = arr.length, 
       perms = [],
       rest,
       picked,
       restPerms,
       next;

    //for one or less item there is only one permutation 
    if (len <= 1)
        return [arr];

    for (var i=0; i<len; i++)
    {
        //copy original array to avoid changing it while picking elements
        rest = Object.create(arr);

        //splice removed element change array original array(copied array)
        //[1,2,3,4].splice(2,1) will return [3] and remaining array = [1,2,4]
        picked = rest.splice(i, 1);

        //get the permutation of the rest of the elements
        restPerms = permutations(rest);

       // Now concat like a+permute(bc) for each
       for (var j=0; j<restPerms.length; j++)
       {
           next = picked.concat(restPerms[j]);
           perms.push(next);
       }
    }

   return perms;
}

Take your time to understand this. I got this code from (pertumation in JavaScript)

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Another one in Python, it's not in place as @cdiggins's, but I think it's easier to understand

def permute(num):
    if len(num) == 2:
        # get the permutations of the last 2 numbers by swapping them
        yield num
        num[0], num[1] = num[1], num[0]
        yield num
    else:
        for i in range(0, len(num)):
            # fix the first number and get the permutations of the rest of numbers
            for perm in permute(num[0:i] + num[i+1:len(num)]):
                yield [num[i]] + perm

for p in permute([1, 2, 3, 4]):
    print p
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There is already plenty of good solutions here, but I would like to share how I solved this problem on my own and hope that this might be helpful for somebody who would also like to derive his own solution.

After some pondering about the problem I have come up with two following conclusions:

  1. For the list L of size n there will be equal number of solutions starting with L1, L2 ... Ln elements of the list. Since in total there are n! permutations of the list of size n, we get n! / n = (n-1)! permutations in each group.
  2. The list of 2 elements has only 2 permutations => [a,b] and [b,a].

Using these two simple ideas I have derived the following algorithm:

permute array
    if array is of size 2
       return first and second element as new array
       return second and first element as new array
    else
        for each element in array
            new subarray = array with excluded element
            return element + permute subarray

Here is how I implemented this in C#:

public IEnumerable<List<T>> Permutate<T>(List<T> input)
{
    if (input.Count == 2) // this are permutations of array of size 2
    {
        yield return new List<T>(input);
        yield return new List<T> {input[1], input[0]}; 
    }
    else
    {
        foreach(T elem in input) // going through array
        {
            var rlist = new List<T>(input); // creating subarray = array
            rlist.Remove(elem); // removing element
            foreach(List<T> retlist in Permutate(rlist))
            {
                retlist.Insert(0,elem); // inserting the element at pos 0
                yield return retlist;
            }

        }
    }
}
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the simplest way I can think to explain this is by using some pseudo code

so

list of 1, 2 ,3
for each item in list
    templist.Add(item)
    for each item2 in list
        if item2 is Not item
            templist.add(item)
               for each item3 in list
                   if item2 is Not item
                      templist.add(item)

                   end if
               Next
            end if

    Next
    permanentListofPermutaitons,add(templist)
    tempList.Clear()
Next

Now obviously this is not the most flexible way to do this, and doing it recursively would be a lot more functional by my tired sunday night brain doesn't want to think about that at this moment. If no ones put up a recursive version by the morning I'll do one.

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doesnt works for unknown number of permutations –  CodeMonkey Sep 22 '12 at 7:03
3  
If no ones put up a recursive version by the morning I'll do one. No one put a recursive version up. –  ArtB Jan 4 '13 at 18:31
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