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In my views.py, I'm building a list of two-tuples, where the second item in the tuple is another list, like this:

[ Product_Type_1, [ product_1, product_2 ],
  Product_Type_2, [ product_3, product_4 ]]

In plain old Python, I could iteration the list like this:

for product_type, products in list:
    print product_type
    for product in products:
        print product

I can't seem to do the same thing in my Django template:

{% for product_type, products in product_list %}
    print product_type
    {% for product in products %}
        print product
    {% endfor %}
{% endfor %}

I get this error from Django:

Caught an exception while rendering: zip argument #2 must support iteration

Of course, there is some HTML markup in the template, not print statements. Is tuple unpacking not supported in the Django template language? Or am I going about this the wrong way? All I am trying to do is display a simple hierarchy of objects - there are several product types, each with several products (in models.py, Product has a foreign key to Product_type, a simple one-to-many relationship).

Obviously, I am quite new to Django, so any input would be appreciated.

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2  
You talk about tuples, but your question contains only lists. They are different things in python. –  Harley Holcombe Nov 7 '08 at 2:48
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4 Answers

up vote 33 down vote accepted

it would be best if you construct your data like {note the '(' and ')' can be exchanged for '[' and ']' repectively, one being for tuples, one for lists}

[ (Product_Type_1, ( product_1, product_2 )),
   (Product_Type_2, ( product_3, product_4 )) ]

and have the template do this:

{% for product_type, products in product_type_list %}
    {{ product_type }}
    {% for product in products %}
        {{ product }}
    {% endfor %}
{% endfor %}

the way tuples/lists are unpacked in for loops is based on the item returned by the list iterator. each iteration only one item was returned. the first time around the loop, Product_Type_1, the second your list of products...

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1  
i.e. you thought you were building a list of two-tuples, but you forgot the tuple part - note the extra parentheses surrounding the product type/product list pairs in Cipher's answer –  insin Nov 7 '08 at 20:17
    
This does not work for older Django versions (like the one used in the GAE). Use Ashwin Rao's answer if you get this error: " 'for' statements with five words should end in 'reversed' " –  Franziskus Karsunke Aug 1 '11 at 12:14
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Another way is as follows.

If one has a list of tuples say

mylst = [(a, b, c), (x, y, z), (l, m, n)],

then one can unpack this list in the template file in the following manner. In my case I had a list of tuples which contained the URL, title, and summary of a document.

{\% for item in mylst \%}    
     {{ item.0 }} {{ item.1}} {{ item.2 }}    
{\% endfor \%}
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This is exactly what I was looking for, thanks. –  mlsteeves Apr 3 '11 at 2:17
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Just send the template a list of product types and do something like:

{% for product_type in product_type_list %}
    {{ product_type }}
    {% for product in product_type.products.all %}
        {{ product }}
    {% endfor %}
{% endfor %}

It's been a little while so I can't remember exactly what the syntax is, let me know if that works. Check the documentation.

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+1: don't over-process in the view –  S.Lott Nov 7 '08 at 3:10
    
Chris Lawlor hasn't explained how he's ended up with the data structure he has (which isn't actually list of two-tuples), but this suggested approach would result in N + 1 queries to display the product list. –  insin Nov 7 '08 at 20:14
    
Here be dragons. Using this suggestion, you're making a separate trip to the database for each product_type. I suspect that minimizing the database load is probably the motivation behind using tuples in the first place. –  btubbs Dec 3 '09 at 1:05
    
I think you could use select_related() to mitigate that particular concern, right? –  Charles Offenbacher Apr 16 '11 at 0:58
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You must used this way:

{% for product_type, products in product_list.items %}
    print product_type
    {% for product in products %}
        print product
    {% endfor %}
{% endfor %}

Don't forget the variable items in the dictionary data

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