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I have a simple animation which simply modify the position of a button:

[UIView beginAnimation:nil context:nil];
[UIView setAnimationsDuration:3.0];
[UIView setAnimationCurve:UIViewAnimationCurveEaseInOut];
mybutton.frame = CGREctMake(20, 233, 280, 46);
[UIView commitAnimations];

I want to perform some other animations when this one is finish, how to do that?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

a code segment for getting start.. setup initial (the first) animation:

- (void) aniPath:(AnimationPath *) path
{   
    [UIView beginAnimations:path->aniname context:path];
    [UIView setAnimationDuration:path->interval];
    [UIView setAnimationDelegate:self];
    [UIView setAnimationDidStopSelector:@selector(aniDone:finished:context:)];

    // your initial animation

    [UIView commitAnimations];
}

chains to another animation when the first is done:

- (void) aniDone:(NSString *) aniname finished:(BOOL) finished context:(void *) context
{
    AnimationPath *path = (AnimationPath *) context;
    if ([aniname isEqualToString:path->aniname]) {
        [UIView beginAnimations:path->aniname context:context];
        [UIView setAnimationDuration:path->interval];
        [UIView setAnimationDelegate:self];
        [UIView setAnimationDidStopSelector:@selector(aniDone:finished:context:)];

        // more animations, even recursively 

        [UIView commitAnimations];          
    }
}
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What is AnimationPath, and why are you using the -> operator on it? If AnimationPath is an Objective-C class, you should definitely not be using ->. You should never access an ivar from outside the class itself unless you have a really good reason to. You should create accessor methods, or use Obj-C properties, and use those to access aniname and interval. –  Nick Forge May 6 '10 at 6:05
    
AnimationPath is my own struct to coordinate the animation path. You may safely ignore it or replace with your own data structure. –  ohho May 6 '10 at 7:40
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You could look at setAnimationBeginsFromCurrentState:. All the animations are run in their own threads, so [UIView commitAnimations] is a nonblocking call. So, if you begin another animation immediately after committing the first one, after appropriately setting whether or not it begins from the current state, I think you'll get the behavior you want. To wit:

[UIView beginAnimation:nil context:nil];
// set up the first animation
[UIView commitAnimations];

[UIView beginAnimation:nil context:nil];
[UIView setAnimationBeginsFromCurrentState:NO];
// set up the second animation
[UIView commitAnimations];

Alternately, you could provide a callback by doing something like

[UIView beginAnimation:nil context:nil];
[UIView setAnimationDelegate:self];
[UIView setAnimationDidStopSelector:@selector(animationDidStop:finished:context:)
// set up the first animation
[UIView commitAnimations];

//...

- (void)animationDidStop:(NSString *)animationID finished:(NSNumber *)finished context:(void *)context {
    // set up the second animation here
}
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Use the +[UIVIew setAnimationDelegate:] and +[UIView setAnimationDidStopSelector:] methods to configure your class to receive a message when the animation ends.

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it quite easier.

you can just

- (void)animationDidContiune:(NSString *)animationID finished:(NSNumber *)finished context:(void *)context {
    UIView *currentObj = context;
    [self callTheAnimation: currentObj];
}

you can easily loop the animation.

To end it - I would create an animationDidEnded and use it instead of animationDidContiune once you want to stop it (like simple if in animation that chooses either to contiune or end).

HF.

AND WHAT's IMPORTANT:

use this type of animating meths:

- (void)callTheAnimation:(UIView*)itemView
{

    [UIView beginAnimations:@"animation" context:itemView];
        .
        .
        .
}

they are quite flexible - you can animate whatever here due to hierarchy of the objects.

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