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I need to use certain font for my entire application. I have .ttf file for the same. Is it possible to set this as default font, at application start up and then use it elsewhere in the application? When set, how do i use it in my layout XMLs?

Sample code, tutorial that can help me here is appreciated.

Thanks.

share|improve this question

16 Answers 16

Yes with reflection. This works (based on this answer):

(Note: this is a workaround due to lack of support for custom fonts, so if you want to change this situation please do up-vote the android issue here).

import java.lang.reflect.Field;
import android.content.Context;
import android.graphics.Typeface;

public final class FontsOverride {

    public static void setDefaultFont(Context context,
            String staticTypefaceFieldName, String fontAssetName) {
        final Typeface regular = Typeface.createFromAsset(context.getAssets(),
                fontAssetName);
        replaceFont(staticTypefaceFieldName, regular);
    }

    protected static void replaceFont(String staticTypefaceFieldName,
            final Typeface newTypeface) {
        try {
            final Field staticField = Typeface.class
                    .getDeclaredField(staticTypefaceFieldName);
            staticField.setAccessible(true);
            staticField.set(null, newTypeface);
        } catch (NoSuchFieldException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

You then need to overload the few default fonts, for example in an application class:

public final class Application extends android.app.Application {
    @Override
    public void onCreate() {
        super.onCreate();
        FontsOverride.setDefaultFont(this, "DEFAULT", "MyFontAsset.ttf");
        FontsOverride.setDefaultFont(this, "MONOSPACE", "MyFontAsset2.ttf");
        FontsOverride.setDefaultFont(this, "SERIF", "MyFontAsset3.ttf");
        FontsOverride.setDefaultFont(this, "SANS_SERIF", "MyFontAsset4.ttf");
    }
}

Or course if you are using the same font file, you can improve on this to load it just once.

However I tend to just override one, say "MONOSPACE", then set up a style to force that font typeface application wide:

<resources>
    <style name="AppBaseTheme" parent="android:Theme.Light">
    </style>

    <!-- Application theme. -->
    <style name="AppTheme" parent="AppBaseTheme">
        <item name="android:typeface">monospace</item>
    </style>
</resources>

API 21 Android 5.0

I've investigated the reports in the comments that it doesn't work and it appears to be incompatible with the theme android:Theme.Material.Light.

If that theme is not important to you, use an older theme, e.g.:

<style name="AppTheme" parent="android:Theme.Holo.Light.DarkActionBar">
    <item name="android:typeface">monospace</item>
</style>
share|improve this answer
1  
Ported this into C# (xamarin monodroid) - works perfectly! – Yura Sokolov Jan 2 '14 at 10:50
5  
how would you override monospace bold or italic? – Christopher Rivera Mar 26 '14 at 19:01
15  
It is not working with android 5.0 API 21 any idea? – Vikas Patidar Nov 10 '14 at 20:08
3  
@weston Never mind. I have achieved it. There was a mistake in my understanding. You have done a great job. Can you just tell me one thing? Why it is not working for DEFAULT Typeface? I have changed Typeface to MONOSPACE as your suggestion and then apply the loginc, it worked. But not working for DEFAULT – Jay Stepin Nov 29 '14 at 3:56
2  
I find it really annoying to have to swap out the default TextView everywhere to use custom fonts or use a reflection based solution like this. Combined with the limiting set of fonts available in android, it makes developing good looking apps a lot of hard work. I've added a feature request to the android issue tracker. If you'd like to see this feature, you can star the issue here: code.google.com/p/android/issues/… – Sam Sep 25 '15 at 10:06

While this would not work for an entire application, it would work for an Activity and could be re-used for any other Activity. I've updated my code thanks to @FR073N to support other Views. I'm not sure about issues with Buttons, RadioGroups, etc. because those classes all extend TextView so they should work just fine. I added a boolean conditional for using reflection because it seems very hackish and might notably compromise performance.

Note: as pointed out, this will not work for dynamic content! For that, it's possible to call this method with say an onCreateView or getView method, but requires additional effort.

/**
 * Recursively sets a {@link Typeface} to all
 * {@link TextView}s in a {@link ViewGroup}.
 */
public static final void setAppFont(ViewGroup mContainer, Typeface mFont, boolean reflect)
{
    if (mContainer == null || mFont == null) return;

    final int mCount = mContainer.getChildCount();

    // Loop through all of the children.
    for (int i = 0; i < mCount; ++i)
    {
        final View mChild = mContainer.getChildAt(i);
        if (mChild instanceof TextView)
        {
            // Set the font if it is a TextView.
            ((TextView) mChild).setTypeface(mFont);
        }
        else if (mChild instanceof ViewGroup)
        {
            // Recursively attempt another ViewGroup.
            setAppFont((ViewGroup) mChild, mFont);
        }
        else if (reflect)
        {
            try {
                Method mSetTypeface = mChild.getClass().getMethod("setTypeface", Typeface.class);
                mSetTypeface.invoke(mChild, mFont); 
            } catch (Exception e) { /* Do something... */ }
        }
    }
}

Then to use it you would do something like this:

final Typeface mFont = Typeface.createFromAsset(getAssets(),
"fonts/MyFont.ttf"); 
final ViewGroup mContainer = (ViewGroup) findViewById(
android.R.id.content).getRootView();
HomeActivity.setAppFont(mContainer, mFont);

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
3  
I think the best way would be to override textview. This method could get somewhat redundant if you have an application with a lot of views. – zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz Jul 9 '12 at 0:36
1  
It could... but according to the Android specs you want to avoid layouts deeper than 4 levels and 100 views wide (even that's quite a bit). Recursion can be bad in terms of performance, but even if your layout was 20 levels that's not even significant. – Tom Jul 9 '12 at 0:52
    
I would agree that it doesn't have a noticeable impact on perfomance and I am not trying to say your answer is wrong. I just don't like cycling through every view in the layout if I don't need to. Also, by extending TextView, if you want to modify the appearance in another way you would only have to change the code in one spot. – zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz Jul 9 '12 at 1:11
1  
Just wanted to add that above code just covers TextViews but ListViews, Alerts, Toasts, Map Markers etc. will still use the system font. – csch May 2 '13 at 10:50
1  
guys this function takes 3 parameters, when you call it recursively you passed 2 parameters ??? which is the correct one ? what is reflect?? – MBH Jul 30 '15 at 17:01

I would like to improve weston's answer for API 21 Android 5.0.

Cause

Under API 21, most of the text styles include fontFamily setting, like:

<style name="TextAppearance.Material">
     <item name="fontFamily">@string/font_family_body_1_material</item>
</style>

Which applys the default Roboto Regular font:

<string name="font_family_body_1_material">sans-serif</string>

The original answer fails to apply monospace font, because android:fontFamily has greater priority to android:typeface attribute (reference). Using Theme.Holo.* is a valid workaround, because there is no android:fontFamily settings inside.

Solution

Since Android 5.0 put system typeface in static variable Typeface.sSystemFontMap (reference), we can use the same reflection technique to replace it:

protected static void replaceFont(String staticTypefaceFieldName,
        final Typeface newTypeface) {
    if (isVersionGreaterOrEqualToLollipop()) {
        Map<String, Typeface> newMap = new HashMap<String, Typeface>();
        newMap.put("sans-serif", newTypeface);
        try {
            final Field staticField = Typeface.class
                    .getDeclaredField("sSystemFontMap");
            staticField.setAccessible(true);
            staticField.set(null, newMap);
        } catch (NoSuchFieldException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    } else {
        try {
            final Field staticField = Typeface.class
                    .getDeclaredField(staticTypefaceFieldName);
            staticField.setAccessible(true);
            staticField.set(null, newTypeface);
        } catch (NoSuchFieldException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
nice workaround for L. however, I'm wondering why this doesn't seem to work for my Buttons and Tool Bar titles. I'm overriding the default font in MainApplication as follows: FontsOverride.setDefaultFont(this, "DEFAULT", "MyFontAsset.ttf");. I'm using Nexus 5, v5.1.1 – kip2 Jun 8 '15 at 13:08
1  
Hey , Thank you This was very helpful, just one thing: this not work at Android 6 (API 22). Then should the code be changed to this: Build.VERSION.SDK_INT == 21 - That is just in the API 21 I test at Nexus with API 22 – Saeid Oct 6 '15 at 13:30
    
Still I'm not able to set custom font using this method in Nexus 9 – Rahul Upadhyay Oct 13 '15 at 7:04
    
This works perfectly (Y) – Hardik Joshi Dec 17 '15 at 6:29
    
Any one having problem not working for 5.1+. Don't override typeface in your values-v21 styles. – Muhammad Babar Feb 19 at 10:13

its very simple... 1.Download and put ur custom font in assets..then write one separate class for text view as follows: here i used futura font

public class CusFntTextView extends TextView {

public CusFntTextView(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, int defStyle) {
    super(context, attrs, defStyle);
    init();
}

public CusFntTextView(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
    super(context, attrs);
    init();
}

public CusFntTextView(Context context) {
    super(context);
    init();
}

private void init() {
    if (!isInEditMode()) {
        Typeface tf = Typeface.createFromAsset(getContext().getAssets(), "Futura.ttf");
        setTypeface(tf);
    }
}

}

and do the following in xml :

 <com.packagename.CusFntTextView
        android:id="@+id/tvtitle"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"         
        android:text="Hi Android"           
        android:textAppearance="?android:attr/textAppearanceLarge"
      />
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that works :) But, what if I want to apply the same fonts for other remaining views/ widgets? Do I need to write separate class for all other views (including dialogs / toasts / actionbars) too? – DroidWorm Narendra Sep 3 '15 at 18:25

there is a grate library for custom fonts in android:custom fonts

here is a sample how to use it.

in gradle you need to put this line

compile 'uk.co.chrisjenx:calligraphy:2.1.0'

and then make a class that extends application an write this code:

public class App extends Application {
    @Override
    public void onCreate() {
        super.onCreate();

        CalligraphyConfig.initDefault(new CalligraphyConfig.Builder()
                        .setDefaultFontPath("your font path")
                        .setFontAttrId(R.attr.fontPath)
                        .build()
        );
    }
} 

and in the activity class put this method before onCreate.

@Override
protected void attachBaseContext(Context newBase) {
    super.attachBaseContext(CalligraphyContextWrapper.wrap(newBase));

and the last thing in your manifest file write like this.

 <application
    android:name=".App"

and it will change the whole activity to your font! its simple and clean!

share|improve this answer
1  
This is the perfect solution. – nizam.sp Feb 25 at 9:57
    
True, its very perfect solution, this way i do not have to write different classes to update fonts for menu items , radio button or checkbox fotns. It applies for all !! thanks :) – Manisha Apr 15 at 22:38
    
Definitely not a perfect solution: Bold / italic / bold-italic styles are overwritten. There is currently no easy way to set those families. – 0101100101 May 11 at 8:37

I would also suggest extending TextView and other controls, but it would be better I consider to set up font in constructs.

public FontTextView(Context context) {
    super(context);
    init();
}

public FontTextView(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
    super(context, attrs);
    init();
}

public FontTextView(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, int defStyle) {
    super(context, attrs, defStyle);
    init();
}

protected void init() {
    setTypeface(Typeface.createFromAsset(getContext().getAssets(), AppConst.FONT));
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Be careful when doing this on platforms before 4.0 - this will leak a lot of resources due to a bug in Android: code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=9904 – Ryan Mentley Jun 20 '13 at 21:52
    
What about all the other views that use font.. – iLoveUnicorns Feb 9 at 12:57
    
how can we revert back to default. I am doing something like this: if(configShared.getString("storeId", AppCredentials.DEFAULT_STORE_ID).equals("2")){ final Field staticField = Typeface.class.getDeclaredField(staticTypefaceFieldName); staticField.setAccessible(true); staticField.set(null, newTypeface); } else{ final Field staticField = Typeface.class.getDeclaredField(staticTypefaceFieldName); staticField.setAccessible(true); staticField.set(null, null); } – Shubham Feb 15 at 15:51

I would like to improve weston's and Roger Huang's answers for over API 21 Android lollipop with theme "Theme.AppCompat".

Below Android 4.4

<resources>
    <style name="AppBaseTheme" parent="Theme.AppCompat.Light">
    </style>

   <!-- Application theme. -->
   <style name="AppTheme" parent="AppBaseTheme">
       <item name="android:typeface">monospace</item>
   </style>
</resources>

Over(equal) API 5.0

<resources>
    <style name="AppBaseTheme" parent="Theme.AppCompat.Light">
    </style>

   <!-- Application theme. -->
   <style name="AppTheme" parent="AppBaseTheme">
       <item name="android:textAppearance">@style/CustomTextAppearance</item>
   </style>

   <style name="CustomTextAppearance">
       <item name="android:typeface">monospace</item>
   </style>
</resources>

And the FontsOverride util file is same as what in weston's answer. I have tested in these phones:

Nexus 5(android 5.1 Primary Android System)

ZTE V5(android 5.1 CM12.1)

XIAOMI note(android 4.4 MIUI6)

HUAWEI C8850(android 2.3.5 UNKNOWN)

share|improve this answer

In summary:

Option#1: Use reflection to apply font (combining weston & Roger Huang's answer):

import java.lang.reflect.Field;
import android.content.Context;
import android.graphics.Typeface;

public final class FontsOverride { 

    public static void setDefaultFont(Context context,
            String staticTypefaceFieldName, String fontAssetName) {
        final Typeface regular = Typeface.createFromAsset(context.getAssets(),
                fontAssetName);
        replaceFont(staticTypefaceFieldName, regular);
    } 

    protected static void replaceFont(String staticTypefaceFieldName,final Typeface newTypeface) {
        if (isVersionGreaterOrEqualToLollipop()) {
            Map<String, Typeface> newMap = new HashMap<String, Typeface>();
            newMap.put("sans-serif", newTypeface);
            try {
                final Field staticField = Typeface.class.getDeclaredField("sSystemFontMap");
                staticField.setAccessible(true);
                staticField.set(null, newMap);
            } catch (NoSuchFieldException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        } else {
            try {
                final Field staticField = Typeface.class.getDeclaredField(staticTypefaceFieldName);
                staticField.setAccessible(true);
                staticField.set(null, newTypeface);
            } catch (NoSuchFieldException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            } 
        }
    }

} 

Usage in Application class:

public final class Application extends android.app.Application {
    @Override 
    public void onCreate() { 
        super.onCreate(); 
        FontsOverride.setDefaultFont(this, "DEFAULT", "MyFontAsset.ttf");
        FontsOverride.setDefaultFont(this, "MONOSPACE", "MyFontAsset2.ttf");
        FontsOverride.setDefaultFont(this, "SERIF", "MyFontAsset3.ttf");
        FontsOverride.setDefaultFont(this, "SANS_SERIF", "MyFontAsset4.ttf");
    } 
} 

set up a style to force that font typeface application wide (based on lovefish):

Pre-Lollipop:

<resources>
    <style name="AppBaseTheme" parent="Theme.AppCompat.Light">
    </style>

   <!-- Application theme. -->
   <style name="AppTheme" parent="AppBaseTheme">
       <item name="android:typeface">monospace</item>
   </style>
</resources>

Lollipop (API 21):

<resources>
    <style name="AppBaseTheme" parent="Theme.AppCompat.Light">
    </style>

   <!-- Application theme. -->
   <style name="AppTheme" parent="AppBaseTheme">
       <item name="android:textAppearance">@style/CustomTextAppearance</item>
   </style>

   <style name="CustomTextAppearance">
       <item name="android:typeface">monospace</item>
   </style>
</resources>

Option2: Subclass each and every View where you need to customize font, ie. ListView, EditTextView, Button, etc. (Palani's answer):

public class CustomFontView extends TextView {

public CustomFontView(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, int defStyle) {
    super(context, attrs, defStyle);
    init(); 
} 

public CustomFontView(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
    super(context, attrs);
    init(); 
} 

public CustomFontView(Context context) {
    super(context);
    init(); 
} 

private void init() { 
    if (!isInEditMode()) {
        Typeface tf = Typeface.createFromAsset(getContext().getAssets(), "Futura.ttf");
        setTypeface(tf);
    } 
} 

Option 3: Implement a View Crawler that traverses through the view hierarchy of your current screen:

Variation#1 (Tom's answer):

public static final void setAppFont(ViewGroup mContainer, Typeface mFont, boolean reflect)
{ 
    if (mContainer == null || mFont == null) return;

    final int mCount = mContainer.getChildCount();

    // Loop through all of the children. 
    for (int i = 0; i < mCount; ++i)
    { 
        final View mChild = mContainer.getChildAt(i);
        if (mChild instanceof TextView)
        { 
            // Set the font if it is a TextView. 
            ((TextView) mChild).setTypeface(mFont);
        } 
        else if (mChild instanceof ViewGroup)
        { 
            // Recursively attempt another ViewGroup. 
            setAppFont((ViewGroup) mChild, mFont);
        } 
        else if (reflect)
        { 
            try { 
                Method mSetTypeface = mChild.getClass().getMethod("setTypeface", Typeface.class);
                mSetTypeface.invoke(mChild, mFont); 
            } catch (Exception e) { /* Do something... */ }
        } 
    } 
} 

Usage :

final ViewGroup mContainer = (ViewGroup) findViewById(
android.R.id.content).getRootView();
HomeActivity.setAppFont(mContainer, Typeface.createFromAsset(getAssets(),
"fonts/MyFont.ttf"));

Variation#2: https://coderwall.com/p/qxxmaa/android-use-a-custom-font-everywhere.

Option #4: Use 3rd Party Lib called Calligraphy.

Personally, I would recommend Option#4, as it saves a lot of headaches.

share|improve this answer

Working for Xamarin.Android:

Class:

public class FontsOverride
{
    public static void SetDefaultFont(Context context, string staticTypefaceFieldName, string fontAssetName)
    {
        Typeface regular = Typeface.CreateFromAsset(context.Assets, fontAssetName);
        ReplaceFont(staticTypefaceFieldName, regular);
    }

    protected static void ReplaceFont(string staticTypefaceFieldName, Typeface newTypeface)
    {
        try
        {
            Field staticField = ((Java.Lang.Object)(newTypeface)).Class.GetDeclaredField(staticTypefaceFieldName);
            staticField.Accessible = true;
            staticField.Set(null, newTypeface);
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
        }
    }
}

Application Implementation:

namespace SomeAndroidApplication
{
    [Application]
    public class App : Application
    {
        public App()
        {

        }

        public App(IntPtr handle, JniHandleOwnership transfer)
            : base(handle, transfer)
        {

        }

        public override void OnCreate()
        {
            base.OnCreate();

            FontsOverride.SetDefaultFont(this, "MONOSPACE", "fonts/Roboto-Light.ttf");
        }
    }
}

Style:

<style name="Theme.Storehouse" parent="Theme.Sherlock">
    <item name="android:typeface">monospace</item>
</style>
share|improve this answer

You can set custom fonts for every layout one by one ,with just one function call from every layout by passing its root View.First ,create a singelton approach for accessing font object like this

 public class Font {
    private static Font font;
    public Typeface ROBO_LIGHT;

    private Font() {

    }

    public static Font getInstance(Context context) {
        if (font == null) {
            font = new Font();
            font.init(context);
        }
        return font;

    }

    public void init(Context context) {

        ROBO_LIGHT = Typeface.createFromAsset(context.getAssets(),
                "Roboto-Light.ttf");
    }

}

You can define different fonts in above class, Now Define a font Helper class that will apply fonts :

   public class FontHelper {

    private static Font font;

    public static void applyFont(View parentView, Context context) {

        font = Font.getInstance(context);

        apply((ViewGroup)parentView);

    }

    private static void apply(ViewGroup parentView) {
        for (int i = 0; i < parentView.getChildCount(); i++) {

            View view = parentView.getChildAt(i);

//You can add any view element here on which you want to apply font 

            if (view instanceof EditText) {

                ((EditText) view).setTypeface(font.ROBO_LIGHT);

            }
            if (view instanceof TextView) {

                ((TextView) view).setTypeface(font.ROBO_LIGHT);

            }

            else if (view instanceof ViewGroup
                    && ((ViewGroup) view).getChildCount() > 0) {
                apply((ViewGroup) view);
            }

        }

    }

}

In the above code, I am applying fonts on textView and EditText only , you can apply fonts on other view elements as well similarly.You just need to pass the id of your root View group to the above apply font method. for example your layout is :

<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:orientation="vertical"
    android:id="@+id/mainParent"
    tools:context="${relativePackage}.${activityClass}" >

    <RelativeLayout
        android:id="@+id/mainContainer"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_above="@+id/homeFooter"
        android:layout_below="@+id/edit" >

        <ImageView
            android:id="@+id/PreviewImg"
            android:layout_width="match_parent"
            android:layout_height="match_parent"
            android:src="@drawable/abc_list_longpressed_holo"
            android:visibility="gone" />

        <RelativeLayout
            android:id="@+id/visibilityLayer"
            android:layout_width="match_parent"
            android:layout_height="fill_parent" >

            <ImageView
                android:id="@+id/UseCamera"
                android:layout_width="wrap_content"
                android:layout_height="wrap_content"
                android:layout_alignParentTop="true"
                android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
                android:src="@drawable/camera" />

            <TextView
                android:id="@+id/tvOR"
                android:layout_width="wrap_content"
                android:layout_height="wrap_content"
                android:layout_below="@+id/UseCamera"
                android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
                android:layout_marginTop="20dp"
                android:text="OR"
                android:textSize="30dp" />

            <TextView
                android:id="@+id/tvAND"
                android:layout_width="wrap_content"
                android:layout_height="wrap_content"
                android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
                android:layout_marginTop="20dp"
                android:text="OR"
                android:textSize="30dp" />

</RelativeLayout>

In the Above Layout the root parent id is "Main Parent " now lets apply font

public class MainActivity extends BaseFragmentActivity {

    private EditText etName;
    private EditText etPassword;
    private TextView tvTitle;
    public static boolean isHome = false;

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);

       Font font=Font.getInstance(getApplicationContext());
        FontHelper.applyFont(findViewById(R.id.mainParent),          getApplicationContext());
   }    
}

Cheers :)

share|improve this answer
    
Nice.. no more same font re-create, only 1 font use for all field. :) – Arfan Mirza Mar 13 '15 at 10:30

A brilliant solution can be found here: https://coderwall.com/p/qxxmaa/android-use-a-custom-font-everywhere.

Simply extend activities from BaseActivity and write those methods. Also you should better cache fonts as described here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/16902532/2914140.


After some research I wrote code that works at Samsung Galaxy Tab A (Android 5.0). Used code of weston and Roger Huang as well as http://stackoverflow.com/a/33236102/2914140. Also tested on Lenovo TAB 2 A10-70L, where it doesn't work. I inserted a font 'Comic Sans' here in order to see a difference.

import android.content.Context;
import android.graphics.Typeface;
import android.os.Build;
import android.util.Log;
import java.lang.reflect.Field;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

public class FontsOverride {
    private static final int BOLD = 1;
    private static final int BOLD_ITALIC = 2;
    private static final int ITALIC = 3;
    private static final int LIGHT = 4;
    private static final int CONDENSED = 5;
    private static final int THIN = 6;
    private static final int MEDIUM = 7;
    private static final int REGULAR = 8;

    private Context context;

    public FontsOverride(Context context) {
        this.context = context;
    }

    public void loadFonts() {
        Map<String, Typeface> fontsMap = new HashMap<>();
        fontsMap.put("sans-serif", getTypeface("comic.ttf", REGULAR));
        fontsMap.put("sans-serif-bold", getTypeface("comic.ttf", BOLD));
        fontsMap.put("sans-serif-italic", getTypeface("comic.ttf", ITALIC));
        fontsMap.put("sans-serif-light", getTypeface("comic.ttf", LIGHT));
        fontsMap.put("sans-serif-condensed", getTypeface("comic.ttf", CONDENSED));
        fontsMap.put("sans-serif-thin", getTypeface("comic.ttf", THIN));
        fontsMap.put("sans-serif-medium", getTypeface("comic.ttf", MEDIUM));
        overrideFonts(fontsMap);
    }

    private void overrideFonts(Map<String, Typeface> typefaces) {
        if (Build.VERSION.SDK_INT == 21) {
            try {
                final Field field = Typeface.class.getDeclaredField("sSystemFontMap");
                field.setAccessible(true);
                Map<String, Typeface> oldFonts = (Map<String, Typeface>) field.get(null);
                if (oldFonts != null) {
                    oldFonts.putAll(typefaces);
                } else {
                    oldFonts = typefaces;
                }
                field.set(null, oldFonts);
                field.setAccessible(false);
            } catch (Exception e) {
                Log.e("TypefaceUtil", "Cannot set custom fonts");
            }
        } else {
            try {
                for (Map.Entry<String, Typeface> entry : typefaces.entrySet()) {
                    final Field staticField = Typeface.class.getDeclaredField(entry.getKey());
                    staticField.setAccessible(true);
                    staticField.set(null, entry.getValue());
                }
            } catch (NoSuchFieldException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

    private Typeface getTypeface(String fontFileName, int fontType) {
        final Typeface tf = Typeface.createFromAsset(context.getAssets(), "fonts/" + fontFileName);
        return Typeface.create(tf, fontType);
    }
}

To run the code in entire application you should write in some class like Application the following:

    new FontsOverride(this).loadFonts();

Create a folder 'fonts' inside 'assets' and put needed fonts there. A simple instruction may be found here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/31697103/2914140.

The Lenovo device also incorrectly gets a value of a typeface. In most times it returns Typeface.NORMAL, sometimes null. Even if a TextView is bold (in xml-file layout). See here: TextView isBold always returns NORMAL. This way a text on a screen is always in a regural font, not bold or italic. So I think it's a bug of a producer.

share|improve this answer

I would suggest extending TextView, and always using your custom TextView within your XML layouts or wherever you need a TextView. In your custom TextView, override setTypeface

@Override
public void setTypeface(Typeface tf, int style) {
    //to handle bold, you could also handle italic or other styles here as well
    if (style == 1){
        tf = Typeface.createFromAsset(getContext().getApplicationContext().getAssets(), "MuseoSans700.otf");
    }else{
        tf = Typeface.createFromAsset(getContext().getApplicationContext().getAssets(), "MuseoSans500.otf");
    }
    super.setTypeface(tf, 0);
}
share|improve this answer

Tom's solution works great, but only works with TextView and EditText.

If you want to cover most of the views (RadioGroup, TextView, Checkbox...), I created a method doing that :

protected void changeChildrenFont(ViewGroup v, Typeface font){
    for(int i = 0; i < v.getChildCount(); i++){

        // For the ViewGroup, we'll have to use recursivity
        if(v.getChildAt(i) instanceof ViewGroup){
            changeChildrenFont((ViewGroup) v.getChildAt(i), font);
        }
        else{
            try {
                Object[] nullArgs = null;
                //Test wether setTypeface and getTypeface methods exists
                Method methodTypeFace = v.getChildAt(i).getClass().getMethod("setTypeface", new Class[] {Typeface.class, Integer.TYPE});
                //With getTypefaca we'll get back the style (Bold, Italic...) set in XML
                Method methodGetTypeFace = v.getChildAt(i).getClass().getMethod("getTypeface", new Class[] {});
                Typeface typeFace = ((Typeface)methodGetTypeFace.invoke(v.getChildAt(i), nullArgs));
                //Invoke the method and apply the new font with the defined style to the view if the method exists (textview,...)
                methodTypeFace.invoke(v.getChildAt(i), new Object[] {font, typeFace == null ? 0 : typeFace.getStyle()});
            }
            //Will catch the view with no such methods (listview...)
            catch (Exception e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}

This method will get back the style of the view set in XML (bold, italic...) and apply them if they exists.

For the ListView, I always create an adapter, and I set the font inside getView.

share|improve this answer

I wrote a class assigning typeface to the views in the current view hierarchy and based os the current typeface properties (bold, normal, you can add other styles if you want):

public final class TypefaceAssigner {

public final Typeface DEFAULT;
public final Typeface DEFAULT_BOLD;

@Inject
public TypefaceAssigner(AssetManager assetManager) {
    DEFAULT = Typeface.createFromAsset(assetManager, "TradeGothicLTCom.ttf");
    DEFAULT_BOLD = Typeface.createFromAsset(assetManager, "TradeGothicLTCom-Bd2.ttf");
}

public void assignTypeface(View v) {
    if (v instanceof ViewGroup) {
        for (int i = 0; i < ((ViewGroup) v).getChildCount(); i++) {
            View view = ((ViewGroup) v).getChildAt(i);
            if (view instanceof ViewGroup) {
                setTypeface(view);
            } else {
                setTypeface(view);
            }
        }
    } else {
        setTypeface(v);
    }
}

private void setTypeface(View view) {
    if (view instanceof TextView) {
        TextView textView = (TextView) view;
        Typeface typeface = textView.getTypeface();
        if (typeface != null && typeface.isBold()) {
            textView.setTypeface(DEFAULT_BOLD);
        } else {
            textView.setTypeface(DEFAULT);
        }
    }
}
}

Now in all fragments in onViewCreated or onCreateView, in all activities in onCreate and in all view adapters in getView or newView just invoke:

typefaceAssigner.assignTypeface(view);
share|improve this answer

I would also like to improve weston's answer for API 21 Android 5.0.

I had the same issue on my Samsung s5, when using DEFAULT font. (with the others fonts it's working fine)

I managed to make it working by setting the typeface ("sans" for example) in XML files, for each Textview or Button

<TextView
android:layout_width="match_parent"
android:layout_height="39dp"
android:textColor="@color/abs__background_holo_light"
android:textSize="12sp"
android:gravity="bottom|center"
android:typeface="sans" />

and in MyApplication Class :

public class MyApplication extends Application {
    @Override
    public void onCreate() {
    TypefaceUtil.overrideFont(getApplicationContext(), "SANS_SERIF",
    "fonts/my_font.ttf");
    }
}

Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer

Yes, its possible to set the font to the entire application.

The easiest way to accomplish this is to package the desired font(s) with your application.

To do this, simply create an assets/ folder in the project root, and put your fonts (in TrueType, or TTF, form) in the assets.

You might, for example, create assets/fonts/ and put your TTF files in there.

public class FontSampler extends Activity {
@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle icicle) {
super.onCreate(icicle);
setContentView(R.layout.main);
TextView tv=(TextView)findViewById(R.id.custom);

Typeface face=Typeface.createFromAsset(getAssets(), "fonts/HandmadeTypewriter.ttf");
tv.setTypeface(face);
}
}
share|improve this answer

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