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I have the following:

for (var i = 0; i < children.length; i++){
   if(hasClass(children[i], "lbExclude")){
       children[i].parentNode.removeChild(children[i]);
   }
};

I would like it to loop through all children's children, etc (not just the top level). I found this line, which seems to do that:

for(var m = n.firstChild; m != null; m = m.nextSibling) {

But I'm unclear on how I refer to the current child if I make that switch? I would no longer have i to clarify the index position of the child. Any suggestions?

Thanks!

Update:

I'm now using the following, according to answer suggestions. Is this the correct / most efficient way of doing so?

                function removeTest(child){     
                    if(hasClass(child, "lbExclude")){
                        child.parentNode.removeChild(child);
                    }
                }

                function allDescendants (node) {
                    for (var i = 0; i < node.childNodes.length; i++) {
                      var child = node.childNodes[i];
                      allDescendants(child);
                      removeTest(child);
                    }
                }           

                var children = temp.childNodes;
                for (var i = 0; i < children.length; i++){          
                   allDescendants(children[i]);
                };
share|improve this question
    
Do you know how many arrays you have nested here? –  thecoshman Apr 26 '10 at 8:56
    
Simply by the name m: m.parentNode.removeChild(m). There might be a problem, though, because removing a node and then taking its nextSibling (in the for clause) will not work as intended. –  Dirk Apr 26 '10 at 8:58
    
@coshman, the amount of nested children will be variable. –  Matrym Apr 26 '10 at 9:03
    
@dirk I didn't think of that. Do you have a proposed way of dealing with that problem? –  Matrym Apr 26 '10 at 9:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Normally you'd have a function that could be called recursively on all nodes. It really depends on what you want to do to the children. If you simply want to gather all descendants, then element.getElementsByTagName may be a better option.

var all = node.getElementsByTagName('*');

for (var i = -1, l = all.length; ++i < l;) {
    removeTest(all[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This will only get elements, not all nodes. –  Quentin Apr 26 '10 at 9:19
3  
They are tested by a hasClass method however, so I believe they intend it to be elements. –  wombleton Apr 26 '10 at 9:36
function allDescendants (node) {
    for (var i = 0; i < node.childNodes.length; i++) {
      var child = node.childNodes[i];
      allDescendants(child);
      doSomethingToNode(child);
    }
}

You loop over all the children, and for each element, you call the same function and have it loop over the children of that element.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, could you be more explicit about how to apply this function in my case? –  Matrym Apr 26 '10 at 9:02

There's no need for calling the 'allDescendants' method on all children, because the method itself already does that. So remove the last codeblock and I think that is a proper solution (á, not thé =])

            function removeTest(child){     
                if(hasClass(child, "lbExclude")){
                    child.parentNode.removeChild(child);
                }
            }

            function allDescendants (node) {
                for (var i = 0; i < node.childNodes.length; i++) {
                  var child = node.childNodes[i];
                  allDescendants(child);
                  removeTest(child);
                }
            }           

            var children = allDescendants(temp);
share|improve this answer

If you use a js library it's as simple as this:

$('.lbExclude').remove();

Otherwise if you want to acquire all elements under a node you can collect them all natively:

var nodes = node.getElementsByTagName('*');
for (var i = 0; i < nodes.length; i++) {
  var n = nodes[i];
  if (hasClass(n, 'lbExclude')) {
    node.parentNode.removeChild(node);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
whoops, didn't see @J-P's answer. –  wombleton Apr 26 '10 at 9:37

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