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I was in need of a way to compress images in .net so i looked into using the .net GZipStream class (or DeflateStream). However i found that decompression was not always successful, sometimes the images would decompress fine and other times i would get a GDI+ error that something is corrupted.

After investigating the issue i found that the decompression was not giving back all the bytes it compressed. So if i compressed 2257974 bytes i would sometimes get back only 2257870 bytes (real numbers).

The most funny thing is that sometimes it would work. So i created this little test method that compresses only 10 bytes and now i don't get back anything at all.

I tried it with both compression classes GZipStream and DeflateStream and i double checked my code for possible errors. I even tried positioning the stream to 0 and flushing all the streams but with no luck.

Here is my code:

    public static void TestCompression()
    {
        byte[] test = new byte[] { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };

        byte[] result = Decompress(Compress(test));

        // This will fail, result.Length is 0
        Debug.Assert(result.Length == test.Length);
    }

    public static byte[] Compress(byte[] data)
    {
        var compressedStream = new MemoryStream();
        var zipStream = new GZipStream(compressedStream, CompressionMode.Compress);
        zipStream.Write(data, 0, data.Length);
        return compressedStream.ToArray();
    }

    public static byte[] Decompress(byte[] data)
    {
        var compressedStream = new MemoryStream(data);
        var zipStream = new GZipStream(compressedStream, CompressionMode.Decompress);
        var resultStream = new MemoryStream();

        var buffer = new byte[4096];
        int read;

        while ((read = zipStream.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) > 0) {
            resultStream.Write(buffer, 0, read);
        }

        return resultStream.ToArray();
    }
share|improve this question
    
Re your comment - it comes down to buffers at different levels; if they aren't all emptied (in the right order) then you don't get all the data. –  Marc Gravell Nov 7 '08 at 4:59
    
Note, for example, that I didn't bother calling Close() on the MemoryStream itself - so I partly agree ;-p –  Marc Gravell Nov 7 '08 at 5:00
    
I'll add an update on this, too.... –  Marc Gravell Nov 7 '08 at 5:02
    
Totally right. (At one point i tried using Close() on the memory stream but the ToArray() method was complaining about it, which would mean i have to create a new buffer, empty the stream on it, close the stream, return the new buffer. Just to much work) –  Bobby Z Nov 7 '08 at 14:48
1  
I forgot to say: this was an excellently phrased question, in that the code sample made it very easy to show that a: it was broken, and b: when it was fixed. Three cheers. –  Marc Gravell Nov 7 '08 at 20:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 44 down vote accepted

You need to Close() the ZipStream after adding all the data you want to compress; it retains a buffer of unwritten bytes internally (even if you Flush()) that needs to be written.

More generally, Stream is IDisposable, so you should also be using each... (yes, I know that MemoryStream isn't going to lose any data, but if you don't get into this habit, it will bite you with other Streams).

public static byte[] Compress(byte[] data)
{
    using (var compressedStream = new MemoryStream())
    using (var zipStream = new GZipStream(compressedStream, CompressionMode.Compress))
    {
        zipStream.Write(data, 0, data.Length);
        zipStream.Close();
        return compressedStream.ToArray();
    }
}

public static byte[] Decompress(byte[] data)
{
    using(var compressedStream = new MemoryStream(data))
    using(var zipStream = new GZipStream(compressedStream, CompressionMode.Decompress))
    using (var resultStream = new MemoryStream())
    { ... }
}

[edit : updated re comment] Re not using things like MemoryStream - this is always a fun one, with lots of votes on either side of the fence: but ultimatey...

(rhetorical - we all know the answer...) How is MemoryStream implemented? is it a byte[] (owned by .NET)? is it a memory-mapped file (owned by the OS)?

The reason you aren't using it is because you are letting knowledge of internal implementation details change how you code against a public API - i.e. you just broke the laws of encapsulation. The public API says: I am IDisposable; you "own" me; therefore, it is your job to Dispose() me when you are through.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, It worked like a charm. It's interesting because i didn't think that Close() is necessary for internal memory since there is no windows resource involved (the same goes for the using block -- it was just cleaner without them) –  Bobby Z Nov 7 '08 at 4:53
    
Close() isn't about freeing a Windows resource here. GZip requires a footer on the end of the data, and Close() tells GZipStream that you've finished writing data and it should write out the footer. –  stevemegson Nov 7 '08 at 9:18
    
You might be correct about letting implementation details define how i right code. But lately Microsoft has been implementing to much the dispose pattern (even on none disposable objects) –  Bobby Z Nov 7 '08 at 14:52
    
And as we all know dispose encapsulates everything in a try/catch/finally block. In this compression method which only uses memory i thought i can use the extra performance. –  Bobby Z Nov 7 '08 at 14:53
3  
"i thought i can use the extra performance" - profile first; to be honest, I wouldn't expect an extra try/finally to make a whole heap of difference –  Marc Gravell Nov 7 '08 at 20:26

Also - keep in mind the DeflateStream in System.IO.Compression does not implement the most efficient deflate algorithm. If you like, there is an alternative to the BCL GZipStream and DeflateStream; it is implemented in a fully-managed library based on zlib code, that performs better than the built-in {Deflate,GZip}Stream in this respect. [ But you still need to Close() the stream to get the full bytestream. ]

These stream classes are shipped in the DotNetZlib assembly, available in the DotNetZip distribution at http://DotNetZip.codeplex.com/.

share|improve this answer
1  
You'll be pleased to hear that .NET 4.5 has woven in the zlib algorithm into the BCL now (with backwards compatibility for existing compressed data). See here for more info: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/jj133817.aspx –  pattermeister Feb 7 '13 at 17:03
1  
Terrific! It took too long, but I'm glad it's finally there! –  Cheeso Feb 10 '13 at 19:18

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