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I have noticed that in a Maven artifact's JAR, the project.version attribute is included in two files:

META-INF/maven/${groupId}/${artifactId}/pom.properties
META-INF/maven/${groupId}/${artifactId}/pom.xml

Is there a recommended way to read this version at runtime?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 100 down vote accepted

You should not need to access Maven-specific files to get the version information of any given library/class.

You can simply use getClass().getPackage().getImplementationVersion() to get the version information that is stored in a .jar-files MANIFEST.MF. Luckily Maven is smart enough Unfortunately Maven does not write the correct information to the manifest as well by default!

Instead one has to modify the <archive> configuration element of the maven-jar-plugin to set addDefaultImplementationEntries and addDefaultSpecificationEntries to true, like this:

<plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-jar-plugin</artifactId>
    <configuration>
        <archive>                   
            <manifest>
                <addDefaultImplementationEntries>true</addDefaultImplementationEntries>
                <addDefaultSpecificationEntries>true</addDefaultSpecificationEntries>
            </manifest>
        </archive>
    </configuration>
</plugin>

Ideally this configuration should be put into the company pom or another base-pom.

Detailed documentation of the <archive> element can be found in the Maven Archive documentation.

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sadly not every classloader does seem to load these properties from the manifest file (I remember having problems with Tomcat in exactly this case). –  dwegener Dec 15 '12 at 14:17
    
@avithan: really? I never had a problem with Tomcat with this approach. Also, I think a classloader that ignores the manifest is probably not conforming. –  Joachim Sauer Dec 16 '12 at 12:18
    
@JoachimSauer ok, I was wrong. Currently it seems it works great on HotSpot but does not work reliable on OpenJDK. I will report back when I get detailed information –  dwegener Jan 9 '13 at 16:56
    
@avithan this is relevant to me (and I have not seen what you report) - have you gotten detailed information yet? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Mar 13 '13 at 9:42
    
Unfortunately this doesn't work if the project is run from Eclipse or using "mvn exec:java". –  Jaan Mar 20 at 8:26

To follow up the answer above, for a .war artifact, I found I had to apply the equivalent configuration to maven-war-plugin, rather than maven-jar-plugin:

<plugin>
    <artifactId>maven-war-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>2.1</version>
    <configuration>
        <archive>                   
            <manifest>
                <addDefaultImplementationEntries>true</addDefaultImplementationEntries>
                <addDefaultSpecificationEntries>true</addDefaultSpecificationEntries>
            </manifest>
        </archive>
        <archiveClasses>true</archiveClasses>
    </configuration>
</plugin>

This added the version information to MANIFEST.MF in the project's .jar (included in WEB-INF/lib of the .war)

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1  
<archiveClasses>true</archiveClasses> caused error in my case. But problem got solved stackoverflow.com/questions/14934299/… –  Paul Verest Feb 20 '13 at 2:06
    
When i try this then my result is always null although the MANIFEST.MF in the war files contains the correct information. –  thomas.mc.work Jun 4 at 11:34

Here's a method for getting the version from the pom.properties, falling back to getting it from the manifest

public synchronized String getVersion() {
    String version = null;

    // try to load from maven properties first
    try {
        Properties p = new Properties();
        InputStream is = getClass().getResourceAsStream("/META-INF/maven/com.my.group/my-artefact/pom.properties");
        if (is != null) {
            p.load(is);
            version = p.getProperty("version", "");
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        // ignore
    }

    // fallback to using Java API
    if (version == null) {
        Package aPackage = getClass().getPackage();
        if (aPackage != null) {
            version = aPackage.getImplementationVersion();
            if (version == null) {
                version = aPackage.getSpecificationVersion();
            }
        }
    }

    if (version == null) {
        // we could not compute the version so use a blank
        version = "";
    }

    return version;
} 
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1  
Put this in a static initializer block. –  opyate Feb 4 '13 at 15:48
1  
Good advice. Although, if you're using this in a servlet (or .jsp), be sure to use getServletContext().getResourceAsStream instead of getClass().getResourceAsStream –  Sandman Nov 18 '13 at 12:34
    
This only works when the application is run from the jar. If run from exec-maven-plugin (e.g. Netbeans) the resource is null. –  Leif Gruenwoldt Oct 27 at 14:46

I spent some time on the two main approaches here and they didn't work-out for me. I am using Netbeans for the builds, may be there's more going on there. I had some errors and warnings from Maven 3 with some constructs, but I think those were easy to correct. No biggie.

I did find an answer that looks maintainable and simple to implement in this article on DZone:

I already have a resources/config sub-folder, and I named my file: app.properties, to better reflect the kind of stuff we may keep there (like a support URL, etc.).

The only caveat is that Netbeans gives a warning that the IDE needs filtering off. Not sure where/how. It has no effect at this point. Perhaps there's a work around for that if I need to cross that bridge. Best of luck.

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