Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm building a class that derives from Stream to wrap a COM IStream. However I've come across an issue where I need to release the COM IStream deteministically.

Ok so that's easy just use Marshal.ReleaseComObject in the Dispose method. However I'm not sure its that simple. The Stream base class already has an protected virtual method Dispose(boolean). Here is my first idea:-

    ~ComStreamWrapper()
    {
        if (!_Disposed)
        {
            iop.Marshal.FreeCoTaskMem(_Int64Ptr);
            iop.Marshal.ReleaseComObject(_IStream);
        }
    }

    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        base.Dispose(disposing);

        if (!_Disposed)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                iop.Marshal.FreeCoTaskMem(_Int64Ptr);
                iop.Marshal.ReleaseComObject(_IStream);
            }
            _Disposed = true;
        }
    }

You'll notice there isn't an implementation of Dispose() itself. I'm currently making the asssumption that the existing implementation on Stream does what I need it to. That is calling Diposing(true) and GC.SuppressFinalize. Is this assumption faulty?

Have I missed something? Is there a better approach? You see more of the basic class in this answer to an ealier question.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Overriding the Disposing method and calling it from the finalizer will get the job done. Note that you'll want to release the resources in both cases. Thus:

~ComStreamWrapper()
{
    Dispose(false);
}

protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
{
    base.Dispose(disposing);
    if (!_Disposed)
    {
        iop.Marshal.FreeCoTaskMem(_Int64Ptr);
        iop.Marshal.ReleaseComObject(_IStream);
        _Disposed = true;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The bas class already has a destructor (Finalizer). –  Henk Holterman Apr 26 '10 at 14:07
1  
The Stream class is abstract and doesn't have a finalizer. –  Hans Passant Apr 26 '10 at 14:23
    
It seems you're right, my mistake. –  Henk Holterman Apr 26 '10 at 15:16
    
Lovely, jubbely thanks (again). –  AnthonyWJones Apr 26 '10 at 15:38
add comment

I'm currently making the asssumption that the existing implementation on Stream does what I need it to. That is calling Diposing(true) and GC.SuppressFinalize. Is this assumption faulty?

That's exactly what it does. Well, it calls Close, which is:

public virtual void Close()
{
    this.Dispose(true);
    GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
}

A general tip when you want a definitive answer to what some standard class really does, open it in Reflector and look at the C# disassembly of it.

share|improve this answer
    
Is this general advice justifiable? What if the CLR gets patched and the code changes...? –  mafu Apr 5 '12 at 15:21
    
@mafutrct - then you have to look at it with Reflector again. That tip was to find out what the class really does, not to find out what the documented behaviour is (for which information you are reliant on the documentation). –  Daniel Earwicker Apr 5 '12 at 18:18
    
The MS documentation explicity states that you should not override Close. "Notes to Implementers: In derived classes, do not override the Close method, instead, put all of the Stream cleanup logic in the Dispose method. For more information, see Implementing a Dispose Method." –  bpeikes Feb 12 at 19:37
    
@bpeikes - I don't think anyone is suggested that Close should be overridden? –  Daniel Earwicker Feb 12 at 19:48
    
@DanielEarwicker, you're right. When I initially read your answer I thought you were saying that a Close should be implemented in the derived class. –  bpeikes Feb 13 at 14:11
add comment

This dispose method:

  protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)

is a common pattern. I would assume that every Dispose method in the Framework looks like this (whenever the class can be derived):

public void Dispose()
{
  Dispose(true);
  GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
}
share|improve this answer
    
While I believe you are right, "assume" means unreliable and not trustworthy for a "correct" program. –  mafu Apr 5 '12 at 15:23
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.