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I am trying to build an old 16 bit DOS like OS.

My example kernel code:

    asm(".code16\n");
    void putchar(char);
    int main()
    {
    putchar('A');
    return 0;
    }
    void putchar(char val)
    {
       asm("movb %0, %%al\n"  
           "movb $0x0E, %%ah\n" 
           "int $0x10\n"
          :
          :"r"(val)
          ) ;
    }

This is how I compile it :

nasm -f bin -o ./bin/boot.bin ./source/boot.asm
gcc -nostdinc -fno-builtin -I./include -c -o ./bin/kernel.o ./source/kernel.c
ld -Ttext=0x9000 -o ./bin/kernel.bin ./bin/kernel.o -e 0x0
dd if=/dev/zero of=./bin/empty.bin bs=1440K count=1
cat ./bin/boot.bin ./bin/kernel.bin ./bin/empty.bin|head -c 1440K > ./bin/os
rm ./bin/empty.bin

and I run it in a virtual machine.

When I make the putchar function ( in kernel code ) for constant value ....i.e like this:

 void putchar()
 {
    char val = 'A';
    asm("movb %0, %%al\n" 
    "movb $0x0E, %%ah\n" 
    "int $0x10\n"
    :
    :"r"(val)
    ) ;
 }

then it works fine. But when I pass argument to it (That is in the previous code), then it prints a space for any character. What should I do?

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Did you mean, "a 16-bit os like dos," or, "a 16-bit dos-like os"? –  Marcelo Cantos Apr 26 '10 at 12:29
    
err... I should not use the word 'dos' . Let it be a 16 bit basic os only. :-) –  brainbarshan Apr 26 '10 at 12:33
    
Ahh!! Big wall of code! –  Earlz Apr 26 '10 at 23:26
    
I removed the bootloader code as I would consider it irrelevant for this.. –  Earlz Apr 26 '10 at 23:30
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're trying to make gcc generate 16-bit code, you need to use .code16gcc rather than .code16, in order to get the stack manipulation right for function parameters: see "Writing 16-bit Code" in the gas documentation.

(Also, depending on which gcc version you're using, you may need to compile your kernel.c with either the -fno-unit-at-a-time or -fno-toplevel-reorder option, to ensure that the asm() directive really is encountered by the assembler before any compiled code - otherwise the compiler may shuffle things around.)

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Thank you. It worked. Now my putchar function is working properly. But a new problem came. the array and and pointer stuffs are not working. Example: char *str="Hello"; putchar (str[0]). This is not working. Will you please give me some hint or links regarding this? –  brainbarshan Apr 27 '10 at 7:41
    
Possibly some problem with the setup of the segment registers, and/or the code is not running at the address you think it is. The best way to debug this would be to run it in something which allows you to single-step through the code. I've heard that Bochs and the debugging facilities it provides are supposed to be good for this sort of thing, although I haven't tried it myself. –  Matthew Slattery Apr 27 '10 at 19:12
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I find another compiler to solve the problem: bcc

This is a C-compiler for 8086 cpus which is important for the development of boot loaders or BIOS related 8086 code.

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