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Let's make a list of answers where you post your excellent and favorite extension methods.

The requirement is that the full code must be posted and a example and an explanation on how to use it.

Based on the high interest in this topic I have setup an Open Source Project called extensionoverflow on Codeplex.

Please mark your answers with an acceptance to put the code in the Codeplex project.

Please post the full sourcecode and not a link.

Codeplex News:

24.08.2010 The Codeplex page is now here: http://extensionoverflow.codeplex.com/

11.11.2008 XmlSerialize / XmlDeserialize is now Implemented and Unit Tested.

11.11.2008 There is still room for more developers. ;-) Join NOW!

11.11.2008 Third contributer joined ExtensionOverflow, welcome to BKristensen

11.11.2008 FormatWith is now Implemented and Unit Tested.

09.11.2008 Second contributer joined ExtensionOverflow. welcome to chakrit.

09.11.2008 We need more developers. ;-)

09.11.2008 ThrowIfArgumentIsNull in now Implemented and Unit Tested on Codeplex.

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7  
If possible, I'd vote for Google Code instead of Codeplex for the subversion support. –  chakrit Nov 8 '08 at 10:44
15  
You have subversion support on Codeplex. –  bovium Nov 8 '08 at 18:26
3  
Meh. I would join if it weren't on codeplex. +1 for google code. –  Erik Forbes Nov 11 '08 at 20:25
5  
The problem with codeplex is the speed - the site is horribly, horribly slow. –  Erik Forbes Dec 30 '08 at 20:36
8  
The only reason the language purists aren't turning in their graves is because they're still alive ;) –  Luke Puplett May 6 '10 at 10:28
show 17 more comments

locked by Will May 2 '12 at 20:26

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150 Answers

One of my favorites is an IsLike() extension on String. IsLike() matches VB's Like operator, and is handy when you don't want to write a full-on regex to solve your problem. Usage would be something like this:

"abc".IsLike("a*"); // true
"Abc".IsLike("[A-Z][a-z][a-z]"); // true
"abc123".IsLike("*###"); // true
"hat".IsLike("?at"); // true
"joe".IsLike("[!aeiou]*"); // true

"joe".IsLike("?at"); // false
"joe".IsLike("[A-Z][a-z][a-z]"); // false

Here's the code

public static class StringEntentions {
    /// <summary>
    /// Indicates whether the current string matches the supplied wildcard pattern.  Behaves the same
    /// as VB's "Like" Operator.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="s">The string instance where the extension method is called</param>
    /// <param name="wildcardPattern">The wildcard pattern to match.  Syntax matches VB's Like operator.</param>
    /// <returns>true if the string matches the supplied pattern, false otherwise.</returns>
    /// <remarks>See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/swf8kaxw(v=VS.100).aspx</remarks>
    public static bool IsLike(this string s, string wildcardPattern) {
        if (s == null || String.IsNullOrEmpty(wildcardPattern)) return false;
        // turn into regex pattern, and match the whole string with ^$
        var regexPattern = "^" + Regex.Escape(wildcardPattern) + "$";

        // add support for ?, #, *, [], and [!]
        regexPattern = regexPattern.Replace(@"\[!", "[^")
                                   .Replace(@"\[", "[")
                                   .Replace(@"\]", "]")
                                   .Replace(@"\?", ".")
                                   .Replace(@"\*", ".*")
                                   .Replace(@"\#", @"\d");

        var result = false;
        try {
            result = Regex.IsMatch(s, regexPattern);
        }
        catch (ArgumentException ex) {
            throw new ArgumentException(String.Format("Invalid pattern: {0}", wildcardPattern), ex);
        }
        return result;
    }
}
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1  
Very similar in purpose to the method I posted here. Your implementation allows more flexible patterns, but mine is probably faster ;) –  Thomas Levesque Sep 30 '10 at 21:20
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Similar to the string As and Is above, but global to all objects.

It's quite simple, but I use these a lot to alleviate parens explosion with boxing.

public static class ExtensionMethods_Object
{
    [DebuggerStepThrough()]
    public static bool Is<T>(this object item) where T : class
    {
        return item is T;
    }

    [DebuggerStepThrough()]
    public static bool IsNot<T>(this object item) where T : class
    {
        return !(item.Is<T>());
    }

    [DebuggerStepThrough()]
    public static T As<T>(this object item) where T : class
    {
        return item as T;
    }
}

I am happy for this code to be used at codeplex, indeed it already is.

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2  
@Kamarey It is a subjective preference, but it reduces confusing parens that can build up when you have multiple casts. item as Type becomes (item as Type) or ((Type)item) if you need to use item as the cast type. Also, the left to right scanning of item.As<Type>(). ... is much more readable over boxing in some confusing cases. I did say it was simple, and I agree it is subjective, but I find it can be quite powerful in code readability. –  johnc Jun 23 '10 at 22:35
1  
@Kamarey some people call this "fluent" programming - always programming left to right, never having to back up to put parens on things. Reaching for the arrow keys slows things down. It also keeps in style well with Enumerable and Observable operators. @johnc I would add a To<T> to the list that does (T)item. –  Scott Bilas Oct 1 '10 at 20:46
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There's a lot of functionality you can get from the Random class.

Below are some extension methods I use from time to time. With these, in addition to Next and NextDouble, the Random class gives you NextBool, NextChar, NextDateTime, NextTimeSpan, NextDouble (accepting minValue and maxValue parameters), and my personal favorite: NextString. There are more (NextByte, NextShort, NextLong, etc.); but those are mostly for completeness and don't get used as much. So I didn't include them here (this code is long enough as it is!).

// todo: implement additional CharType values (e.g., AsciiAny)
public enum CharType {
    AlphabeticLower,
    AlphabeticUpper,
    AlphabeticAny,
    AlphanumericLower,
    AlphanumericUpper,
    AlphanumericAny,
    Numeric
}

public static class RandomExtensions {
    // 10 digits vs. 52 alphabetic characters (upper & lower);
    // probability of being numeric: 10 / 62 = 0.1612903225806452
    private const double AlphanumericProbabilityNumericAny = 10.0 / 62.0;

    // 10 digits vs. 26 alphabetic characters (upper OR lower);
    // probability of being numeric: 10 / 36 = 0.2777777777777778
    private const double AlphanumericProbabilityNumericCased = 10.0 / 36.0;

    public static bool NextBool(this Random random, double probability) {
        return random.NextDouble() <= probability;
    }

    public static bool NextBool(this Random random) {
        return random.NextDouble() <= 0.5;
    }

    public static char NextChar(this Random random, CharType mode) {
        switch (mode) {
            case CharType.AlphabeticAny:
                return random.NextAlphabeticChar();
            case CharType.AlphabeticLower:
                return random.NextAlphabeticChar(false);
            case CharType.AlphabeticUpper:
                return random.NextAlphabeticChar(true);
            case CharType.AlphanumericAny:
                return random.NextAlphanumericChar();
            case CharType.AlphanumericLower:
                return random.NextAlphanumericChar(false);
            case CharType.AlphanumericUpper:
                return random.NextAlphanumericChar(true);
            case CharType.Numeric:
                return random.NextNumericChar();
            default:
                return random.NextAlphanumericChar();
        }
    }

    public static char NextChar(this Random random) {
        return random.NextChar(CharType.AlphanumericAny);
    }

    private static char NextAlphanumericChar(this Random random, bool uppercase) {
        bool numeric = random.NextBool(AlphanumericProbabilityNumericCased);

        if (numeric)
            return random.NextNumericChar();
        else
            return random.NextAlphabeticChar(uppercase);
    }

    private static char NextAlphanumericChar(this Random random) {
        bool numeric = random.NextBool(AlphanumericProbabilityNumericAny);

        if (numeric)
            return random.NextNumericChar();
        else
            return random.NextAlphabeticChar(random.NextBool());
    }

    private static char NextAlphabeticChar(this Random random, bool uppercase) {
        if (uppercase)
            return (char)random.Next(65, 91);
        else
            return (char)random.Next(97, 123);
    }

    private static char NextAlphabeticChar(this Random random) {
        return random.NextAlphabeticChar(random.NextBool());
    }

    private static char NextNumericChar(this Random random) {
        return (char)random.Next(48, 58);
    }

    public static DateTime NextDateTime(this Random random, DateTime minValue, DateTime maxValue) {
        return DateTime.FromOADate(
            random.NextDouble(minValue.ToOADate(), maxValue.ToOADate())
        );
    }

    public static DateTime NextDateTime(this Random random) {
        return random.NextDateTime(DateTime.MinValue, DateTime.MaxValue);
    }

    public static double NextDouble(this Random random, double minValue, double maxValue) {
        if (maxValue < minValue)
            throw new ArgumentException("Minimum value must be less than maximum value.");

        double difference = maxValue - minValue;
        if (!double.IsInfinity(difference))
            return minValue + (random.NextDouble() * difference);

        else {
            // to avoid evaluating to Double.Infinity, we split the range into two halves:
            double halfDifference = (maxValue * 0.5) - (minValue * 0.5);

            // 50/50 chance of returning a value from the first or second half of the range
            if (random.NextBool())
                return minValue + (random.NextDouble() * halfDifference);
            else
                return (minValue + halfDifference) + (random.NextDouble() * halfDifference);
        }
    }

    public static string NextString(this Random random, int numChars, CharType mode) {
        char[] chars = new char[numChars];

        for (int i = 0; i < numChars; ++i)
            chars[i] = random.NextChar(mode);

        return new string(chars);
    }

    public static string NextString(this Random random, int numChars) {
        return random.NextString(numChars, CharType.AlphanumericAny);
    }

    public static TimeSpan NextTimeSpan(this Random random, TimeSpan minValue, TimeSpan maxValue) {
        return TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(
            random.NextDouble(minValue.TotalMilliseconds, maxValue.TotalMilliseconds)
        );
    }

    public static TimeSpan NextTimeSpan(this Random random) {
        return random.NextTimeSpan(TimeSpan.MinValue, TimeSpan.MaxValue);
    }
}
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IEnumerable<> Shuffle

I used the Fisher-Yates the algorithm to implement a shuffle function.

By using yield return and breaking the code in two functions, it achieves proper argument validation and deferred execution. (thanks, Dan, for pointing this flaw in my first version)

static public IEnumerable<T> Shuffle<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    if (source == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");

    return ShuffleIterator(source);
}

static private IEnumerable<T> ShuffleIterator<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    T[] array = source.ToArray();
    Random rnd = new Random();          
    for (int n = array.Length; n > 1;)
    {
        int k = rnd.Next(n--); // 0 <= k < n

        //Swap items
        if (n != k)
        {
            T tmp = array[k];
            array[k] = array[n];
            array[n] = tmp;
        }
    }

    foreach (var item in array) yield return item;
}
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1  
If your intention is for this method to be used within LINQ queries, then you might want to consider implementing a ShuffledEnumerable class that only does this work (and probably caches it) on GetEnumerator to provide lazy evaluation a.k.a. deferred execution. Otherwise if someone calls, e.g., var shuffledNames = myObjects.Select(x => x.Name).Distinct().Shuffle(); the operation will get executed immediately, which may not be what he/she expects. Good answer, though! –  Dan Tao Mar 13 '10 at 18:42
1  
@Dan: This is a great point. There's an elegant way to use deferred execution without an explicit declared class, though. yield return solves the problem. I'll edit my answer. –  jpbochi Mar 15 '10 at 1:30
1  
Solid. Now it's basically the logical opposite of OrderBy. Nicely done! –  Dan Tao Mar 15 '10 at 12:30
show 2 more comments

Another useful one for me:

/// <summary>
/// Converts any type in to an Int32
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">Any Object</typeparam>
/// <param name="value">Value to convert</param>
/// <returns>The integer, 0 if unsuccessful</returns>
public static int ToInt32<T>(this T value)
{
  int result;
  if (int.TryParse(value.ToString(), out result))
  {
    return result;
  }
  return 0;
}

/// <summary>
/// Converts any type in to an Int32 but if null then returns the default
/// </summary>
/// <param name="value">Value to convert</param>
/// <typeparam name="T">Any Object</typeparam>
/// <param name="defaultValue">Default to use</param>
/// <returns>The defaultValue if unsuccessful</returns>
public static int ToInt32<T>(this T value, int defaultValue)
{
  int result;
  if (int.TryParse(value.ToString(), out result))
  {
    return result;
  }
  return defaultValue;
}

Example:

int number = "123".ToInt32();

or:

int badNumber = "a".ToInt32(100); // Returns 100 since a is nan
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4  
converting to string to then convert to something else? yuck... –  Pablo Marambio Nov 8 '08 at 22:30
6  
Convert.ToInt32(object)? –  spoon16 Nov 11 '08 at 8:14
2  
If I remeber correctly convert.ToIt32 could throw an exception –  TWith2Sugars Nov 11 '08 at 8:19
show 5 more comments

Timespan-related extensions like:

public static TimeSpan Seconds(this int seconds)
{
  return TimeSpan.FromSeconds(seconds);
}

public static TimeSpan Minutes(this int minutes)
{
  return TimeSpan.FromMinutes(minutes);
}

That allow to use:

1.Seconds()
20.Minutes()

Lock extensions like:

public static IDisposable GetReadLock(this ReaderWriterLockSlim slimLock)
{
  slimLock.EnterReadLock();
  return new DisposableAction(slimLock.ExitReadLock);
}

public static IDisposable GetWriteLock(this ReaderWriterLockSlim slimLock)
{
  slimLock.EnterWriteLock();
  return new DisposableAction(slimLock.ExitWriteLock);
}

public static IDisposable GetUpgradeableReadLock(this ReaderWriterLockSlim slimLock)
{
  slimLock.EnterUpgradeableReadLock();
  return new DisposableAction(slimLock.ExitUpgradeableReadLock);
}

That allow to use locks like:

using (lock.GetUpgradeableReadLock())
{
  // try read
  using (lock.GetWriteLock())
  {
    //do write
  }
}

And many other from the Lokad Shared Libraries

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I use these in my Silverlight projects:

public static void Show(this UIElement element)
{
    element.Visibility = Visibility.Visible;
}

public static void Hide(this UIElement element)
{
    element.Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed;
}
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public static class EnumerableExtensions
{
    [Pure]
    public static U MapReduce<T, U>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, Func<T, U> map, Func<U, U, U> reduce)
    {
        CodeContract.RequiresAlways(enumerable != null);
        CodeContract.RequiresAlways(enumerable.Skip(1).Any());
        CodeContract.RequiresAlways(map != null);
        CodeContract.RequiresAlways(reduce != null);
        return enumerable.AsParallel().Select(map).Aggregate(reduce);
    }
    [Pure]
    public static U MapReduce<T, U>(this IList<T> list, Func<T, U> map, Func<U, U, U> reduce)
    {
        CodeContract.RequiresAlways(list != null);
        CodeContract.RequiresAlways(list.Count >= 2);
        CodeContract.RequiresAlways(map != null);
        CodeContract.RequiresAlways(reduce != null);
        U result = map(list[0]);
        for (int i = 1; i < list.Count; i++)
        {
            result = reduce(result,map(list[i]));
        }
        return result;
    }

    //Parallel version; creates garbage
    [Pure]
    public static U MapReduce<T, U>(this IList<T> list, Func<T, U> map, Func<U, U, U> reduce)
    {
        CodeContract.RequiresAlways(list != null);
        CodeContract.RequiresAlways(list.Skip(1).Any());
        CodeContract.RequiresAlways(map != null);
        CodeContract.RequiresAlways(reduce != null);

        U[] mapped = new U[list.Count];
        Parallel.For(0, mapped.Length, i =>
            {
                mapped[i] = map(list[i]);
            });
        U result = mapped[0];
        for (int i = 1; i < list.Count; i++)
        {
            result = reduce(result, mapped[i]);
        }
        return result;
    }

}
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3  
Isn't it somewhat dangerous to already enumerate "enumerable" by calling "Count" on it in a contract check? Or is this not a runtime check? –  flq May 9 '09 at 16:38
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I'm disappointed that the .NET Framework prefers that files and directories be represented as strings rather than objects, and that the FileInfo and DirectoryInfo types aren't as powerful as I'd wish. So, I started to write fluent extension methods as I needed them, e.g.:

public static FileInfo SetExtension(this FileInfo fileInfo, string extension)
{
    return new FileInfo(Path.ChangeExtension(fileInfo.FullName, extension));
}

public static FileInfo SetDirectory(this FileInfo fileInfo, string directory)
{
    return new FileInfo(Path.Combine(directory, fileInfo.Name));
}

Yes, you can put this in the codeplex

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1  
FileInfo and DirectoryInfo is rather slow compared to their string File and Directory counterpart. You might want to profile those. –  chakrit Jan 18 '09 at 20:40
add comment

Some of my best method extensions (I have a lot!):

public static T ToEnum<T>(this string str) where T : struct
{
    return (T)Enum.Parse(typeof(T), str);
}

//DayOfWeek sunday =  "Sunday".ToEnum<DayOfWeek>();

public static string ToString<T>(this IEnumerable<T> collection, string separator)
{
    return ToString(collection, t => t.ToString(), separator);
}

public static string ToString<T>(this IEnumerable<T> collection, Func<T, string> stringElement, string separator)
{
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    foreach (var item in collection)
    {
        sb.Append(stringElement(item));
        sb.Append(separator);
    }
    return sb.ToString(0, Math.Max(0, sb.Length - separator.Length));  // quita el ultimo separador
}

//new []{1,2,3}.ToString(i=>i*2, ", ")  --> "2, 4, 6"

Also, the next ones are meant to be able to continue in the same line in almost any situation, not declaring new variables and then removing state:

public static R Map<T, R>(this T t, Func<T, R> func)
{
    return func(t);
}

ExpensiveFindWally().Map(wally=>wally.FirstName + " " + wally.LastName)

public static R TryCC<T, R>(this T t, Func<T, R> func)
    where T : class
    where R : class
{
    if (t == null) return null;
    return func(t);
}

public static R? TryCS<T, R>(this T t, Func<T, R> func)
    where T : class
    where R : struct
{
    if (t == null) return null;
    return func(t);
}

public static R? TryCS<T, R>(this T t, Func<T, R?> func)
    where T : class
    where R : struct
{
    if (t == null) return null;
    return func(t);
}

public static R TrySC<T, R>(this T? t, Func<T, R> func)
    where T : struct
    where R : class
{
    if (t == null) return null;
    return func(t.Value);
}

public static R? TrySS<T, R>(this T? t, Func<T, R> func)
    where T : struct
    where R : struct
{
    if (t == null) return null;
    return func(t.Value);
}

public static R? TrySS<T, R>(this T? t, Func<T, R?> func)
    where T : struct
    where R : struct
{
    if (t == null) return null;
    return func(t.Value);
}

//int? bossNameLength =  Departament.Boss.TryCC(b=>b.Name).TryCS(s=>s.Length);


public static T ThrowIfNullS<T>(this T? t, string mensaje)
    where T : struct
{
    if (t == null)
        throw new NullReferenceException(mensaje);
    return t.Value;
}

public static T ThrowIfNullC<T>(this T t, string mensaje)
    where T : class
{
    if (t == null)
        throw new NullReferenceException(mensaje);
    return t;
}

public static T Do<T>(this T t, Action<T> action)
{
    action(t);
    return t;
}

//Button b = new Button{Content = "Click"}.Do(b=>Canvas.SetColumn(b,2));

public static T TryDo<T>(this T t, Action<T> action) where T : class
{
    if (t != null)
        action(t);
    return t;
}

public static T? TryDoS<T>(this T? t, Action<T> action) where T : struct
{
    if (t != null)
        action(t.Value);
    return t;
}

Hope it doesn't look like coming from Mars :)

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HTH. These are some of my main ones.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Globalization;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace Insert.Your.Namespace.Here.Helpers
{
    public static class Extensions
    {
        public static bool IsNullOrEmpty<T>(this IEnumerable<T> iEnumerable)
        {
            // Cheers to Joel Mueller for the bugfix. Was .Count(), now it's .Any()
            return iEnumerable == null ||
                   !iEnumerable.Any();
        }

        public static IList<T> ToListIfNotNullOrEmpty<T>(this IList<T> iList)
        {
            return iList.IsNullOrEmpty() ? null : iList;
        }

        public static PagedList<T> ToPagedListIfNotNullOrEmpty<T>(this PagedList<T> pagedList)
        {
            return pagedList.IsNullOrEmpty() ? null : pagedList;
        }

        public static string ToPluralString(this int value)
        {
            return value == 1 ? string.Empty : "s";
        }

        public static string ToReadableTime(this DateTime value)
        {
            TimeSpan span = DateTime.Now.Subtract(value);
            const string plural = "s";


            if (span.Days > 7)
            {
                return value.ToShortDateString();
            }

            switch (span.Days)
            {
                case 0:
                    switch (span.Hours)
                    {
                        case 0:
                            if (span.Minutes == 0)
                            {
                                return span.Seconds <= 0
                                           ? "now"
                                           : string.Format("{0} second{1} ago",
                                                           span.Seconds,
                                                           span.Seconds != 1 ? plural : string.Empty);
                            }
                            return string.Format("{0} minute{1} ago",
                                                 span.Minutes,
                                                 span.Minutes != 1 ? plural : string.Empty);
                        default:
                            return string.Format("{0} hour{1} ago",
                                                 span.Hours,
                                                 span.Hours != 1 ? plural : string.Empty);
                    }
                default:
                    return string.Format("{0} day{1} ago",
                                         span.Days,
                                         span.Days != 1 ? plural : string.Empty);
            }
        }

        public static string ToShortGuidString(this Guid value)
        {
            return Convert.ToBase64String(value.ToByteArray())
                .Replace("/", "_")
                .Replace("+", "-")
                .Substring(0, 22);
        }

        public static Guid FromShortGuidString(this string value)
        {
            return new Guid(Convert.FromBase64String(value.Replace("_", "/")
                                                         .Replace("-", "+") + "=="));
        }

        public static string ToStringMaximumLength(this string value, int maximumLength)
        {
            return ToStringMaximumLength(value, maximumLength, "...");
        }

        public static string ToStringMaximumLength(this string value, int maximumLength, string postFixText)
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(postFixText))
            {
                throw new ArgumentNullException("postFixText");
            }

            return value.Length > maximumLength
                       ? string.Format(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture,
                                       "{0}{1}",
                                       value.Substring(0, maximumLength - postFixText.Length),
                                       postFixText)
                       :
                           value;
        }

        public static string SlugDecode(this string value)
        {
            return value.Replace("_", " ");
        }

        public static string SlugEncode(this string value)
        {
            return value.Replace(" ", "_");
        }
    }
}
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4  
On the IsNullOrEmpty one I'd hate to call it on a million-item enumerator. It would loop through all million items just to tell me it's not empty. Better: return iEnumerable == null || !iEnumerable.Any(); –  Joel Mueller Nov 8 '08 at 4:41
show 8 more comments

Sometimes its handy to write out a string on a selected element in a list with a custom seperator.

For instance if you have a List<Person> and want to loop out lastname seperated with a comma you could do this.

string result = string.Empty;
foreach (var person in personList) {
   result += person.LastName + ", ";
}
result = result.Substring(0, result.Length - 2);
return result;

Or you could use this handy extension method

public static string Join<T>(this IEnumerable<T> collection, Func<T, string> func, string separator)
{
  return String.Join(separator, collection.Select(func).ToArray());
}

And use it like this

personList.Join(x => x.LastName, ", ");

Which produces the same result, in this case a list of lastnames seperated by a comma.

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1  
I called my version of this ToDelimitedString to avoid confusion with the built-in LINQ Join method. –  Joel Mueller Feb 23 '10 at 23:29
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Binary search :

public static T BinarySearch<T, TKey>(this IList<T> list, Func<T, TKey> keySelector, TKey key)
        where TKey : IComparable<TKey>
{
    int min = 0;
    int max = list.Count;
    int index = 0;
    while (min < max)
    {
        int mid = (max + min) / 2;
        T midItem = list[mid];
        TKey midKey = keySelector(midItem);
        int comp = midKey.CompareTo(key);
        if (comp < 0)
        {
            min = mid + 1;
        }
        else if (comp > 0)
        {
            max = mid - 1;
        }
        else
        {
            return midItem;
        }
    }
    if (min == max &&
        keySelector(list[min]).CompareTo(key) == 0)
    {
        return list[min];
    }
    throw new InvalidOperationException("Item not found");
}

Usage (assuming that the list is sorted by Id) :

var item = list.BinarySearch(i => i.Id, 42);

The fact that it throws an InvalidOperationException may seem strange, but that's what Enumerable.First does when there's no matching item.

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I just went through all 4 pages of this so far, and I was rather surprised that I didn't see this way to shorten a check for InvokeRequired:

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;

/// <summary>
/// Extension methods acting on Control objects.
/// </summary>
internal static class ControlExtensionMethods
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Invokes the given action on the given control's UI thread, if invocation is needed.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="control">Control on whose UI thread to possibly invoke.</param>
    /// <param name="action">Action to be invoked on the given control.</param>
    public static void MaybeInvoke(this Control control, Action action)
    {
        if (control != null && control.InvokeRequired)
        {
            control.Invoke(action);
        }
        else
        {
            action();
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Maybe Invoke a Func that returns a value.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">Return type of func.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="control">Control on which to maybe invoke.</param>
    /// <param name="func">Function returning a value, to invoke.</param>
    /// <returns>The result of the call to func.</returns>
    public static T MaybeInvoke<T>(this Control control, Func<T> func)
    {
        if (control != null && control.InvokeRequired)
        {
            return (T)(control.Invoke(func));
        }
        else
        {
            return func();
        }
    }
}

Usage:

myForm.MaybeInvoke(() => this.Text = "Hello world");

// Sometimes the control might be null, but that's okay.
var dialogResult = this.Parent.MaybeInvoke(() => MessageBox.Show(this, "Yes or no?", "Choice", MessageBoxButtons.YesNo));
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Some Date functions:

public static bool IsFuture(this DateTime date, DateTime from)
{
    return date.Date > from.Date;
}

public static bool IsFuture(this DateTime date)
{
    return date.IsFuture(DateTime.Now);
}

public static bool IsPast(this DateTime date, DateTime from)
{
    return date.Date < from.Date;
}

public static bool IsPast(this DateTime date)
{
    return date.IsPast(DateTime.Now);
}
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1  
We have some similar ones in our codebase: IsBefore(), IsOnOrBefore(), IsOnOrAfter(), IsAfter(), IsBeforeToday(), IsAfterToday(). They wrap rather trivial code, but they improve readability significantly. –  KeithS Oct 22 '10 at 22:25
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Pythonic methods for Dictionaries:

/// <summary>
/// If a key exists in a dictionary, return its value, 
/// otherwise return the default value for that type.
/// </summary>
public static U GetWithDefault<T, U>(this Dictionary<T, U> dict, T key)
{
    return dict.GetWithDefault(key, default(U));
}

/// <summary>
/// If a key exists in a dictionary, return its value,
/// otherwise return the provided default value.
/// </summary>
public static U GetWithDefault<T, U>(this Dictionary<T, U> dict, T key, U defaultValue)
{
    return dict.ContainsKey(key)
        ? dict[key]
        : defaultValue;
}

Useful for when you want to append a timestamp to a filename to assure uniqueness.

/// <summary>
/// Format a DateTime as a string that contains no characters
//// that are banned from filenames, such as ':'.
/// </summary>
/// <returns>YYYY-MM-DD_HH.MM.SS</returns>
public static string ToFilenameString(this DateTime dt)
{
    return dt.ToString("s").Replace(":", ".").Replace('T', '_');
}
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1  
Use dt.ToString("yyy-MM-dd_HH.mm.ss"); directly to avoid creating 2 additional String instances. Since this format doesn't include a time zone component, a UTC time would be better via dt.ToUniversalTime().ToString(...). –  devstuff Dec 15 '08 at 4:49
4  
Better use TryGetValue, you're doing two lookups instead of just one. –  Anton Tykhyy May 7 '09 at 8:04
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Function to compare Files/Directories through the OS File System Info. This is useful to compare shares with local files.

Usage:

DirectoryInfo dir = new DirectoryInfo(@"C:\test\myShareDir");
Console.WriteLine(dir.IsSameFileAs(@"\\myMachineName\myShareDir"));

FileInfo file = new FileInfo(@"C:\test\myShareDir\file.txt");
Console.WriteLine(file.IsSameFileAs(@"\\myMachineName\myShareDir\file.txt"));

Code:

public static class FileExtensions
{
    struct BY_HANDLE_FILE_INFORMATION
    {
        public uint FileAttributes;
        public System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME CreationTime;
        public System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME LastAccessTime;
        public System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME LastWriteTime;
        public uint VolumeSerialNumber;
        public uint FileSizeHigh;
        public uint FileSizeLow;
        public uint NumberOfLinks;
        public uint FileIndexHigh;
        public uint FileIndexLow;
    }

    //
    // CreateFile constants
    //
    const uint FILE_SHARE_READ = 0x00000001;
    const uint OPEN_EXISTING = 3;
    const uint GENERIC_READ = (0x80000000);
    const uint FILE_FLAG_BACKUP_SEMANTICS = 0x02000000;


    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    static extern IntPtr CreateFile(
        string lpFileName,
        uint dwDesiredAccess,
        uint dwShareMode,
        IntPtr lpSecurityAttributes,
        uint dwCreationDisposition,
        uint dwFlagsAndAttributes,
        IntPtr hTemplateFile);

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    static extern bool GetFileInformationByHandle(IntPtr hFile, out BY_HANDLE_FILE_INFORMATION lpFileInformation);

    public static bool IsSameFileAs(this FileSystemInfo file, string path)
    {
        BY_HANDLE_FILE_INFORMATION fileInfo1, fileInfo2;
        IntPtr ptr1 = CreateFile(file.FullName, GENERIC_READ, FILE_SHARE_READ, IntPtr.Zero, OPEN_EXISTING, FILE_FLAG_BACKUP_SEMANTICS, IntPtr.Zero);
        if ((int)ptr1 == -1)
        {
            System.ComponentModel.Win32Exception e = new System.ComponentModel.Win32Exception(Marshal.GetLastWin32Error());
            throw e;
        }
        IntPtr ptr2 = CreateFile(path, GENERIC_READ, FILE_SHARE_READ, IntPtr.Zero, OPEN_EXISTING, FILE_FLAG_BACKUP_SEMANTICS, IntPtr.Zero);
        if ((int)ptr2 == -1)
        {
            System.ComponentModel.Win32Exception e = new System.ComponentModel.Win32Exception(Marshal.GetLastWin32Error());
            throw e;
        }
        GetFileInformationByHandle(ptr1, out fileInfo1);
        GetFileInformationByHandle(ptr2, out fileInfo2);

        return ((fileInfo1.FileIndexHigh == fileInfo2.FileIndexHigh) &&
            (fileInfo1.FileIndexLow == fileInfo2.FileIndexLow));
    }
}
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2  
This is not using Extension Methods. Its just a static class. –  bovium Nov 8 '08 at 18:31
1  
To make that an extension method change: static public bool CompareFiles(string path1, string path2) to static public bool IsSameFileAs(this string path1, string path2); then use like: if (file1.IsSameFileAs(file2) –  Armstrongest Nov 9 '08 at 4:53
1  
Two different files on different drives might coincidentally have the same FileIndex. You need to compare VolumeSerialNumber also - but then your example will fail, since VolumeSerialNumbers are different. –  Rasmus Faber Jan 8 '09 at 9:53
4  
Shouldn't you be closing those file handles? –  marijne Nov 16 '09 at 15:41
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I find myself doing this, over and over, again...

public static bool EqualsIgnoreCase(this string a, string b)
{
    return string.Equals(a, b, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
}

...followed by StartsWithIgnoreCase, EndsWithIgnoreCase and ContainsIgnoreCase.

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When using a dictionary where the key is a string, return existing key using a case-insensitive search. Our use case for this was for file paths.

/// <summary>
/// Gets the key using <paramref name="caseInsensitiveKey"/> from <paramref name="dictionary"/>.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The dictionary value.</typeparam>
/// <param name="dictionary">The dictionary.</param>
/// <param name="caseInsensitiveKey">The case insensitive key.</param>
/// <returns>
/// An existing key; or <see cref="string.Empty"/> if not found.
/// </returns>
public static string GetKeyIgnoringCase<T>(this IDictionary<string, T> dictionary, string caseInsensitiveKey)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(caseInsensitiveKey)) return string.Empty;
    foreach (string key in dictionary.Keys)
    {
        if (key.Equals(caseInsensitiveKey, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase))
        {
            return key;
        }
    }
    return string.Empty;
}
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2  
There's a separate keys collection property in the dictionary that might be able to do this faster –  Joel Coehoorn Jun 3 '10 at 14:40
1  
Good thinking Joel, updated answer (and my own code:) –  Si. Jun 4 '10 at 1:41
2  
If you need case insensitive keys, you can pass StringComparer.InvariantIgnoreCase to the dictionary constructor –  Thomas Levesque Aug 19 '10 at 19:49
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I use this extension method usually with anonymous types to get a dictionary ala ruby

public static Dictionary<string, object> ToDictionary(this object o)
{
    var dictionary = new Dictionary<string, object>();

    foreach (var propertyInfo in o.GetType().GetProperties())
    {
        if (propertyInfo.GetIndexParameters().Length == 0)
        {
            dictionary.Add(propertyInfo.Name, propertyInfo.GetValue(o, null));
        }
    }

    return dictionary;
}

You can use it

var dummy = new { color = "#000000", width = "100%", id = "myid" };
Dictionary<string, object> dict = dummy.ToDictionary();

And with an extended method as

public static void ForEach<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Action<T> action)
{
    foreach (T item in source)
    {
        action(item);
    }
}

You can do it

dummy.ToDictionary().ForEach((p) => Console.Write("{0}='{1}' ", p.Key, p.Value));

Output

color='#000000' width='100%' id='myid'

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Here's a fun one from our codebase at work. Walk an expensive lazy-eval enumerable on a job thread and push the results back through an observable.

public static IObservable<T> ToAsyncObservable<T>(this IEnumerable<T> @this)
{
    return Observable.Create<T>(observer =>
    {
        var task = new Task(() =>
        {
            try
            {
                @this.Run(observer.OnNext);
                observer.OnCompleted();
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                observer.OnError(e);
            }
        });

        task.Start();

        return () => { };
    });
}

Silly sample:

new DirectoryInfo(@"c:\program files")
    .EnumerateFiles("*", SearchOption.AllDirectories)
    .ToAsyncObservable()
    .BufferWithTime(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(0.5))
    .ObserveOnDispatcher()
    .Subscribe(
        l => Console.WriteLine("{0} received", l.Count),
        () => Console.WriteLine("Done!"));

for (;;)
{
    Thread.Sleep(10);
    Dispatcher.PushFrame(new DispatcherFrame());
}

Obviously this extension will be useless to you if you aren't using the brilliant Reactive Extensions!

UPDATE thanks to Richard in the comments, this extension method is unnecessary. RX already has an extension method "ToObservable" that takes an IScheduler. Use that instead!

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3  
Any reason why enumerable.ToObservable(Scheduler.TaskPool) doesn't solve the same problem? –  Richard Szalay Oct 14 '10 at 19:08
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You all probably already know that an interesting usage for extension methods is as a kind of mixin. Some extension methods, like the XmlSerializable, pollute almost every class; and it doesn't make sense to most of them, like Thread and SqlConnection.

Some functionality should be explicitly mixed in to the classes that want to have it. I propose a new notation to this kind of type, with the M prefix.

The XmlSerializable then, is this:

public interface MXmlSerializable { }
public static class XmlSerializable {
  public static string ToXml(this MXmlSerializable self) {
    if (self == null) throw new ArgumentNullException();
    var serializer = new XmlSerializer(self.GetType());
    using (var writer = new StringWriter()) {
      serializer.Serialize(writer, self);
      return writer.GetStringBuilder().ToString();
    }
  }
  public static T FromXml<T>(string xml) where T : MXmlSerializable {
    var serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
    return (T)serializer.Deserialize(new StringReader(xml));
  }
}

A class then mixes it in:

public class Customer : MXmlSerializable {
  public string Name { get; set; }
  public bool Preferred { get; set; }
}

And the usage is simply:

var customer = new Customer { 
  Name = "Guybrush Threepwood", 
  Preferred = true };
var xml = customer.ToXml();

If you like the idea, you can create a new namespace for useful mixins in the project. What do you think?

Oh, and by the way, I think most extension methods should explicitly test for null.

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static string Format( this string str,
                    , params Expression<Func<string,object>>[] args)
{
    var parameters = args.ToDictionary
                        ( e=>string.Format("{{{0}}}",e.Parameters[0].Name)
                        , e=>e.Compile()(e.Parameters[0].Name));

    var sb = new StringBuilder(str);
    foreach(var kv in parameters)
    {
        sb.Replace( kv.Key
                  , kv.Value != null ? kv.Value.ToString() : "");
    }

    return sb.ToString();
}

With the above extension you can write this:

var str = "{foo} {bar} {baz}".Format(foo=>foo, bar=>2, baz=>new object());

and you'll get "foo 2 System.Object".

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2  
Performance is horrible with Compile(). –  Rinat Abdullin Dec 16 '08 at 6:31
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Simple but nicer than "Enumerable.Range", IMHO:

/// <summary>
/// Replace "Enumerable.Range(n)" with "n.Range()":
/// </summary>
/// <param name="n">iterations</param>
/// <returns>0..n-1</returns>
public static IEnumerable<int> Range(this int n)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        yield return i;
}
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Here's another pair I've found endless use for:

public static T ObjectWithMin<T, TResult>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence, Func<T, TResult> predicate)
    where T : class
    where TResult : IComparable
{
    if (!sequence.Any()) return null;

    //get the first object with its predicate value
    var seed = sequence.Select(x => new {Object = x, Value = predicate(x)}).FirstOrDefault();
    //compare against all others, replacing the accumulator with the lesser value
    //tie goes to first object found
    return
        sequence.Select(x => new {Object = x, Value = predicate(x)})
            .Aggregate(seed,(acc, x) => acc.Value.CompareTo(x.Value) <= 0 ? acc : x).Object;
}

public static T ObjectWithMax<T, TResult>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence, Func<T, TResult> predicate)
    where T : class
    where TResult : IComparable
{
    if (!sequence.Any()) return null;

    //get the first object with its predicate value
    var seed = sequence.Select(x => new {Object = x, Value = predicate(x)}).FirstOrDefault();
    //compare against all others, replacing the accumulator with the greater value
    //tie goes to last object found
    return
        sequence.Select(x => new {Object = x, Value = predicate(x)})
            .Aggregate(seed, (acc, x) => acc.Value.CompareTo(x.Value) > 0 ? acc : x).Object;
}

Usage:

var myObject = myList.ObjectWithMin(x=>x.PropA);

These methods basically replace usages like

var myObject = myList.OrderBy(x=>x.PropA).FirstOrDefault(); //O(nlog(n)) and unstable

and

var myObject = myList.Where(x=>x.PropA == myList.Min(x=>x.PropA)).FirstOrDefault(); //O(N^2) but stable

and

var minValue = myList.Min(x=>x.PropA);
var myObject = myList.Where(x=>x.PropA == minValue).FirstOrDefault(); //not a one-liner, and though linear and stable it's slower (evaluates the enumerable twice)
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Here's a bitmap extension which can convert bitmaps to grayscale;

public static Bitmap GrayScale(this Bitmap bitmap)
{
    Bitmap newBitmap = new Bitmap(bitmap.Width, bitmap.Height);
    Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(newBitmap);

    //the grayscale ColorMatrix
    ColorMatrix colorMatrix = new ColorMatrix(new float[][] {
            new float[] {.3f, .3f, .3f, 0, 0},
            new float[] {.59f, .59f, .59f, 0, 0},
            new float[] {.11f, .11f, .11f, 0, 0},
            new float[] {0, 0, 0, 1, 0},
            new float[] {0, 0, 0, 0, 1}
    });

    ImageAttributes attributes = new ImageAttributes();
    attributes.SetColorMatrix(colorMatrix);
    g.DrawImage(bitmap, new Rectangle(0, 0, bitmap.Width, bitmap.Height), 0, 0, bitmap.Width, bitmap.Height, GraphicsUnit.Pixel, attributes);
    g.Dispose();
    return newBitmap;
}

Sample usage:

Bitmap grayscaled = bitmap.GrayScale()
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I didn't want to add anything that was already said, so here are some that I use that haven't been mentioned. (Sorry if this is too lengthy):

public static class MyExtensions
{
    public static bool IsInteger(this string input)
    {
    	int temp;

    	return int.TryParse(input, out temp);
    }

    public static bool IsDecimal(this string input)
    {
    	decimal temp;

    	return decimal.TryParse(input, out temp);
    }

    public static int ToInteger(this string input, int defaultValue)
    {
    	int temp;

    	return (int.TryParse(input, out temp)) ? temp : defaultValue;
    }

    public static decimal ToDecimal(this string input, decimal defaultValue)
    {
    	decimal temp;

    	return (decimal.TryParse(input, out temp)) ? temp : defaultValue;
    }

    public static DateTime ToFirstOfTheMonth(this DateTime input)
    {
    	return input.Date.AddDays(-1 * input.Day + 1);
    }

    // Intentionally returns 0 if the target date is before the input date.
    public static int MonthsUntil(this DateTime input, DateTime targetDate)
    {
    	input = input.ToFirstOfTheMonth();

    	targetDate = targetDate.ToFirstOfTheMonth();

    	int result = 0;

    	while (input < targetDate)
    	{
		input = input.AddMonths(1);
    		result++;
    	}

    	return result;
    }

    // Used for backwards compatibility in a system built before my time.
    public static DataTable ToDataTable(this IEnumerable input)
    {
    	// too much code to show here right now...
    }
}
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I use this a lot with nullable numbers. I helps catch those division by 0, NaN, Infinity...

public static bool IsNullOrDefault<T>(this T? o) 
    where T : struct
{
        return o == null || o.Value.Equals(default(T));
}
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My suggestion:

public static bool IsNullOrEmpty(this ICollection obj)
{
  return (obj == null || obj.Count == 0);
}

Works with collections and arrays:

bool isNullOrEmpty = array.IsNullOrEmpty()

instead of

bool isNullOrEmpty = array == null || array.Length == 0;
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protected by Mat Aug 30 '11 at 7:30

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