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I found a lot of comparisions here, but not this one; So, what is best in each one?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by laalto, Kevin Panko, J. Polfer, Luc M, paqogomez Dec 13 '13 at 16:38

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What are you willing to do? –  Macarse Apr 27 '10 at 18:18
    
@Macarse a small standalone app in Java –  Tom Brito Apr 27 '10 at 19:54
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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

There's a full comparison at SQLite's site.

SQLite is much more restricted, as it only supports a small subset of SQL92, whether Derby (now JavaDB) has full support of SQL92 and SQL99.

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Nice! Of course I would like to know if the Derby team point of view about this comparison.. but thanks anyway :) –  Tom Brito Apr 26 '10 at 14:51
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Here's a thread in the derby user mailing lists: old.nabble.com/Derby-v-SQLite-td13496423.html –  mgv Apr 26 '10 at 14:54
    
still not what I expected, but thanks! –  Tom Brito Apr 27 '10 at 19:56
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One thing you should keep in mind about SQLite is that, besides supporting only a subset of SQL92, only the thread that created the SQLite database may access it. If you can live with that, then take it for its better performance.

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That's not correct. We have an application that accesses its SQLite database from multiple threads. See sqlite.org/threadsafe.html - quote: Serialized. In serialized mode, SQLite can be safely used by multiple threads with no restriction. [...] The default mode is serialized. –  Bluehorn Feb 19 at 6:32
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I execute a complex SQL which has more than 6000 rows 10000 times in my Websphere Server. Total net execution times are like that:

          Derby (In Memory)   Oracle(standard DB) SQLite (In Memory)  HSQLDb (In Memory)
          nano sec.  second    nano sec.  second  nano sec.  second   nano sec. second
1. try    58000000    0,058   6149976000   6,1    1141988000   1,14   999403000    1,00
2. try    78560000    0,078   5268477000   5,2    1182621000   1,18   1338705000   1,34
3. try    58849000    0,058   5200898000   5,2    1133003000   1,13   2239527000   2,24
4. try    60901000    0,06    5435216000   5,4    1205442000   1,21   1370711000   1,37
5. try    58798000    0,058   6501929000   6,5    1186734000   1,19   1001800000   1,00
6. try    62928000    0,062   5913053000   5,9    1224470000   1,22   1066736000   1,07
7. try    71171000    0,071   5111207000   5,1    1200769000   1,20   1304524000   1,30
8. try    66913000    0,066   5517989000   5,5    1173495000   1,17   1299230000   1,30
9. try    58777000    0,058   7209555000   7,2    1179013000   1,18   1031795000   1,03
10. try   75299000    0,075   5356514000   5,3    1182715000   1,18   1368461000   1,37
average   65019600    0,064   5766481400   5,7    1181025000   1,18   1302089200   1,30

I obviously compare Derby, SQLite and HSQLDB. Oracle isn't a in memory db. But I put it's result to table because to show speed difference between a in memory db and normal db.

PS: In SQLite and HSQLDB result aren't stable. So I choose 10 stable results in 100 try. Sometimes HSQLDB is faster than SQLite. I think theirs performance are same.

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