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I have a problem which is either something I have completely failed to understand, or very strange. It's probably the first one, but I have spent the whole afternoon googling with no success, so here goes...

I have a class called Schedule, which has as a member a vector of Room. However, when I compile using cmake, or even by hand, I get the following:

In file included from schedule.cpp:1:
schedule.h:13: error: ‘Room’ was not declared in this scope
schedule.h:13: error: template argument 1 is invalid
schedule.h:13: error: template argument 2 is invalid
schedule.cpp: In constructor ‘Schedule::Schedule(int, int, int)’:
schedule.cpp:12: error: ‘Room’ was not declared in this scope
schedule.cpp:12: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘r’
schedule.cpp:13: error: request for member ‘push_back’ in ‘((Schedule*)this)->Schedule::_sched’, which is of non-class type ‘int’
schedule.cpp:13: error: ‘r’ was not declared in this scope

Here are the relevant bits of code:

#include <vector>

#include "room.h"

class Schedule
{
  private:
    std::vector<Room> _sched; //line 13
    int _ndays;
    int _nrooms;
    int _ntslots;
  public:
    Schedule();
    ~Schedule();
    Schedule(int nrooms, int ndays, int ntslots);
};
Schedule::Schedule(int nrooms, int ndays, int ntslots):_ndays(ndays), _nrooms(nrooms),_ntslots(ntslots)
{
  for (int i=0; i<nrooms;i++)
  {
    Room r(ndays,ntslots);
    _sched.push_back(r);
  }
}

In theory, g++ should compile a class before the one that includes it. There are no circular dependencies here, it's all straightforward stuff. I am completely stumped on this one, which is what leads me to believe that I must be missing something. :-D

Edit:
The contents of room.h from the comments below:

#include <vector>  
#include "day.h" 

class Room 
{ 
private: 
   std::vector<Day> _days; 

public: 
   Room(); 
   Room(int ndays, int length); 
   ~Room(); 
};
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5  
What does room.h look like? Is the room class capitalized there, or lowercase? –  mmr Apr 26 '10 at 16:22
    
Is Room by any chance defined inside a namespace? –  Péter Török Apr 26 '10 at 16:25
    
It looks like this: #include <vector> #include "day.h" class Room { private: std::vector<Day> _days; public: Room(); Room(int ndays, int length); ~Room(); }; –  Tom Macdonald Apr 26 '10 at 16:26
2  
Please edit your question to include "room.h"'s contents; too much formatting is lost in the comments. –  Mike DeSimone Apr 26 '10 at 16:31
1  
Can you show the include guards you've used? One thing that would cause this problem is if you accidentally used the same macro name for the guards in "schedule.h" and "room.h". –  Mike Dinsdale Apr 26 '10 at 17:59
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It may not matter, I but I see no include guards in your headers. Shouldn't matter, but just to cover any angle...

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They were omitted for brevity. (See third comment on my answer.) Also, in this case where the include tree is pretty much a line, they don't make a difference. –  Mike DeSimone Apr 26 '10 at 18:04
    
@Michael Dorgan: It was an include guard error. See below for details. Thank you! –  Tom Macdonald Apr 27 '10 at 9:41
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Even though you've omitted some important code (namely, the contents of day.h), my psychic debugger sense tells me that you have a circular dependency in your header files:

// schedule.h
#include "room.h"

// room.h
#include "day.h"

// day.h
#include "schedule.h"

This is bad. In order to break the circular dependency, you need to figure out which file doesn't need to know the concrete implementation details of the others. This is done using forward references. For example, I can see that your definition of the Room class doesn't actually need to know what sizeof(Day) is for the class definition, so you can rewrite it as follows:

#include <vector>
// do NOT include day.h

class Day;  // forward declaration
class Room 
{ 
private: 
   std::vector<Day> _days; 

public: 
   Room(); 
   Room(int ndays, int length); 
   ~Room(); 
};

Now room.h doesn't depend on day.h, breaking the circular dependency. Of course, the implementation file room.cpp will still have to include day.h.

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+1 Thinking the same thing. –  JRL Apr 26 '10 at 18:03
    
I don't think you can have a vector of an incomplete type. Also, how would a circular dependency produce the error the OP is actually getting? If the include guards are present as he says then the include inside day.h would fail, and you'd expect to get an error in day.h. –  Mike Dinsdale Apr 26 '10 at 18:36
1  
@Mike: Yes, you can have a vector of an incomplete type, so long as you don't invoke any methods on it. Try it out. Of course, in order to be useful, you'll have to complete the type, but that can be done in the cpp file instead of the header file. –  Adam Rosenfield Apr 26 '10 at 19:08
    
@Mike: A circular dependency could produce the error because it depends on the which header is included first in the source file. If schedule.cpp first includes room.h, which includes day.h, which includes schedule.h, which tries to include room.h again, then that re-inclusion will not produce any output (since the header guard is now defined), so when the definition of the Schedule class is reached, room.h has technically been included, but the Room class has not yet been defined because of the circular dependency, resulting in OP's error. –  Adam Rosenfield Apr 26 '10 at 19:12
    
@Adam: Thanks, you're right about the vector! (I did try it, but I tried to instantiate one, which doesn't work :) It does work as a member though as you say, presumably the class needs to be defined before the constructor plus any place you call methods on the vector). –  Mike Dinsdale Apr 26 '10 at 19:28
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I can't tell from your post of schedule.h/.cpp but it looks like you might have the #include "room.h" in schedule.cpp but your schedule.h is making use of class Room. #include "room.h" should be in schedule.h if this is the case.

Or you can use forward declaration in schedule.h.

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The include line is in schedule.h –  Tom Macdonald Apr 26 '10 at 16:52
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In theory, g++ should compile a class before the one that includes it.

g++ should be able to compile your source files in any order it sees fit. The order it includes headers into your source is set by the order of your #include statements.

The most likely case is that the class name is room, and not Room. Next likely is that the name is some other thing besides Room. Less likely is that it is in a namespace other than the root namespace.

EDIT: Okay, if it's none of those, make sure that the room.h that is being included is your room.h and not some other room.h. Nothing like editing the wrong copy of a file to waste your day.

EDIT 2: I'm assuming your header files have the usual include-once structure:

#ifndef schedule_h
#define schedule_h

// header file code goes here.

#endif

... and that you omitted it for brevity.

EDIT 3: I just copied the code you gave to a new directory, and created a dummy day.h file with the contents:

typedef int Day;

I then used g++ -c -o schedule.o schedule.cpp to build it and got no errors. Therefore the error is something we're not seeing.

Edit 4: Okay, sanity check time. Look at the top of room.h and make sure it says

#ifndef room_h

and not

#ifdef room_h
share|improve this answer
    
I rechecked, just in case. Room is spelled correctly. There are no namespace definitions, so it is using std. –  Tom Macdonald Apr 26 '10 at 16:51
    
@ravloony: it doesn't use the std namespace, it uses the global namespace. –  Bill Apr 26 '10 at 16:55
    
I did indeed omit it for brevity. I'm going to copy all the source to a clean folder and try again. –  Tom Macdonald Apr 26 '10 at 16:55
    
@Bill: You're absolutely right. That is what I meant. Sorry. –  Tom Macdonald Apr 26 '10 at 16:56
    
@Mike DeSimone: Copying all the code to a clean source folder gives the exact same error. –  Tom Macdonald Apr 26 '10 at 17:05
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What does Room.cpp look like?

Also.. I've never had any problems with this, but maybe you forgot to put an extra line at the bottom of your header file?

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