Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been using Python for quite a while now, and I'm still unsure as to why you would subclass from object. What is the difference between this:

class MyClass():
    pass

And this:

class MyClass(object):
    pass

As far as I understand, object is the base class for all classes and the subclassing is implied. Do you get anything from explicitly subclassing from it? What is the most "Pythonic" thing to do?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This is oldstyle and new style classes in python 2.x. The second form is the up to date version and exist from python 2.2 and above. For new code you should only use new style classes.

In Python 3.x you can again use both form indifferently as the new style is the only one left and both form are truly equivalent. However I believe you should continue to use the MyClass(object) form even for 3.x code at least until python 3.x is widely adopted to avoid any misunderstanding with potential readers of your code used to 2.x.

Behavior between old style and new style classes is very different regarding to certain features like use of super().

See here : New Style classes

You can also see here on SO.

share|improve this answer
1  
Invalid for 3.X –  Noctis Skytower Apr 26 '10 at 16:57
    
@Noctis - what is invalid for 3.x? The old style? The difference between old/new? –  phkahler Apr 26 '10 at 17:13
    
Inheriting from Object is the default behavior for Python 3.x –  Carson Myers Apr 26 '10 at 17:17
    
@Carson, object not Object. @Noctis, it is not invalid, but it is unnecessary. All classes are new-style in Python 3. –  Mark Tolonen Apr 26 '10 at 18:09
1  
@Noctis: OK, I understand what you mean and will edit the answer accordingly. –  kriss Apr 26 '10 at 19:02

agreed with @kriss, @Noctis, and @Carson. more color from me:

class X: pass and class X(): pass are synonyms for classic classes while class X(object): pass is for new-style classes, as you can see here:

>>> class X:pass
... 
>>> class Y(): pass
... 
>>> class Z(object): pass
... 
>>> 
>>> type(X), type(Y), type(Z)
(<type 'classobj'>, <type 'classobj'>, <type 'type'>)

look at the linky provided by @kriss for more details into the differences. what is invalid in Python 3 is the concept of the classic class... the reason is because classic classes have been deprecated. all three idioms create only new-style classes in any 3.x:

>>> class X:pass
... 
>>> class Y(): pass
... 
>>> class Z(object): pass
... 
>>> 
>>> type(X), type(Y), type(Z)
(<class 'type'>, <class 'type'>, <class 'type'>)

what does this mean bottom-line? if you're coding in Python 2, try to use new-style classes as much as possible. this way, you've built in your migration path already. plus new-style classes offer more features than classic classes do. (this is somewhat subjective, but if your [classic] classes are relatively simple, then it's possible you won't need to do anything to get them working in Python 3.)

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 good example. –  Mark Tolonen Apr 26 '10 at 18:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.