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Simple question, how do I convert an associative array to variables in a class? I know there is casting to do an (object) $myarray or whatever it is, but that will create a new stdClass and doesn't help me much. Are there any easy one or two line methods to make each $key => $value pair in my array into a $key = $value variable for my class? I don't find it very logical to use a foreach loop for this, I'd be better off just converting it to a stdClass and storing that in a variable, wouldn't I?

class MyClass {
    var $myvar; // I want variables like this, so they can be references as $this->myvar
    function __construct($myarray) {
        // a function to put my array into variables
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 29 down vote accepted

This simple code should work:

<?php

  class MyClass {
    public function __construct(Array $properties=array()){
      foreach($properties as $key => $value){
        $this->{$key} = $value;
      }
    }
  }

?>

Example usage

$foo = new MyClass(array("hello" => "world"));
$foo->hello // => "world"

Alternatively, this might be a better approach

<?php

  class MyClass {

    private $_data;

    public function __construct(Array $properties=array()){
      $this->_data = $properties;
    }

    // magic methods!
    public function __set($property, $value){
      return $this->_data[$property] = $value;
    }

    public function __get($property){
      return array_key_exists($property, $this->_data)
        ? $this->_data[$property]
        : null
      ;
    }
  }

?>

Usage is the same

// init
$foo = new MyClass(array("hello" => "world"));
$foo->hello;          // => "world"

// set: this calls __set()
$foo->invader = "zim";

// get: this calls __get()
$foo->invader;       // => "zim"

// attempt to get a data[key] that isn't set
$foo->invalid;       // => null
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Don't think you need the { } in the $this->{$key} = $value; statement –  AntonioCS Apr 26 '10 at 17:45
10  
@AntonioCS, it's not necessary but it definitely emphasizes the access of a variable-named property. It also demonstrates that { } can be used when the variable property becomes more complex; e.g., $this->{$this->foo('bar')}->do_something(); –  maček Apr 26 '10 at 17:50
1  
Good point :) –  AntonioCS Apr 27 '10 at 10:42
    
A down-vote after 3+ years? With no explanation? –  maček Aug 16 '13 at 5:59

I would change this:

public function __get($property){
      return array_key_exists($property, $this->_data)
        ? $this->_data[$property]
        : null
      ;
    }

To this:

public function __get($property){
      return array_key_exists($property, $this->_data)
        ? $this->_data[$property]
        : $this->$property
      ;
    }
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3  
Why would you need to do that? That would just cause an infinite looping error if the property didn't exist in the data array as it keeps trying to send it through the magic get method. –  animuson Sep 13 '13 at 16:35

Here's another solution using PDOStatement::fetchObject, though it is a bit of a hack.

$array = array('property1' => 'value1', 'property2' => 'value2');
$className = 'MyClass';

$pdo = new PDO('sqlite::memory:'); // we don't actually need sqlite; any PDO connection will do
$select = 'SELECT ? AS property1, ? AS property2'; // this could also be built from the array keys
$statement = $pdo->prepare($select);

// this last part can also be re-used in a loop
$statement->execute(array_values($array));
$myObject = $statement->fetchObject($className);
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