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Is there a way to pass null arguments to C# methods (something like null arguments in c++)?

For example:

Is it possible to translate the following c++ function to C# method:

private void Example(int* arg1, int* arg2)
{
    if(arg1 == null)
    {
        //do something
    }
    if(arg2 == null)
    {
        //do something else
    }
}
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6 Answers 6

up vote 45 down vote accepted

Yes. There are two kinds of types in .NET: reference types and value types.

References types (generally classes) are always referred to by references, so they support null without any extra work. This means that if a variable's type is a reference type, the variable is automatically a reference.

Value types (e.g. int) by default do not have a concept of null. However, there is a wrapper for them called Nullable. This enables you to encapsulate the non-nullable value type and include null information.

The usage is slightly different, though.

// Both of these types mean the same thing, the ? is just C# shorthand.
private void Example(int? arg1, Nullable<int> arg2)
{
    if (arg1.HasValue)
        DoSomething();

    arg1 = null; // Valid.
    arg1 = 123;  // Also valid.

    DoSomethingWithInt(arg1); // NOT valid!
    DoSomethingWithInt(arg1.Value); // Valid.
}
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I think the nearest C# equivalent to int* would be ref int?. Because ref int? allows the called method to pass a value back to the calling method.

int*

  • Can be null.
  • Can be non-null and point to an integer value.
  • If not null, value can be changed, and the change propagates to the caller.
  • Setting to null is not passed back to the caller.

ref int?

  • Can be null.
  • Can have an integer value.
  • Value can be always be changed, and the change propagates to the caller.
  • Value can be set to null, and this change will also propagate to the caller.
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Starting from C# 2.0, you can use the nullable generic type Nullable, and in C# there is a shorthand notation the type followed by ?

e.g.

private void Example(int? arg1, int? arg2)
{
    if(arg1 == null)
    {
        //do something
    }
    if(arg2 == null)
    {
        //do something else
    }
}
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From C# 2.0:

private void Example(int? arg1, int? arg2)
{
    if(arg1 == null)
    {
        //do something
    }
    if(arg2 == null)
    {
        //do something else
    }
}
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You can use NullableValueTypes (like int?) for this. The code would be like this:

private void Example(int? arg1, int? arg2)
{
    if(!arg1.HasValue)
    {
        //do something
    }
    if(!arg2.HasValue)
    {
        //do something else
    }
}
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The OP's question is answered well already, but the title is just broad enough that I think it benefits from the following primer:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace consolePlay
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Program.test(new DateTime());
            Program.test(null);
            //Program.test(); // <<< Error.  
            // "No overload for method 'test' takes 0 arguments"  
            // So don't mistake nullable to be optional.

            Console.WriteLine("Done.  Return to quit");
            Console.Read();
        }

        static public void test(DateTime? dteIn)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("#" + dteIn.ToString() + "#");
        }
    }
}

output:

#1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM#
##
Done.  Return to quit
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